COMMONS

ESIC SIs debated in the Chamber on 20 February

19 February 2019

On Wednesday 20 February there will be a series of debates in the House of Commons on Statutory Instruments (SIs). Please click here to find out more about what an SI is.

These SIs were originally laid as “proposed negatives”, which means that the Government did not intend for these to be debated and approved by the Houses of Parliament. The European Statutory Instruments Committee’s role is to “sift” through the proposed negative instruments laid under the European (Withdrawal) Act 2018, and in these instances the proposed negative SIs were recommended to upgrade for further debate in the House. These SIs are recommended to be upgraded:

The Motor Vehicles (Compulsory Insurance) (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019

This SI was recommended for further debate because it amends various pieces of domestic legislation.  It also introduces a policy change which removes the requirements for the Motor Insurers Bureau to act as a Compensation Body for UK residents injured in road traffic accidents in the EEA, and to reimburse its foreign counterparts in respect of EU27 visitors in the UK who have been compensated by their ‘home’ Compensation Body.
To read the full reasoning behind the Committee’s decision to upgrade this instrument, read our 14th report here.

The Aquatic Animal Health and Alien Species in Aquaculture (Amendment) (Northern Ireland) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018

This SI aims to establish an appropriate buffer zones to prevent the introduction of exotic diseases to aquatic species in Northern Ireland. This legislative function would be conferred to the competent authority in Northern Ireland.
To read the full reasoning behind the Committee’s decision to upgrade this instrument, read our 10th report here.

The Fertilisers and Ammonium Nitrate Material (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019

This SI would permit to the Welsh Ministers, the Scottish Ministers and the Northern Ireland Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs to charge fees cover the cost of tests needed for official control measures they have imposed on UK Fertilisers. The SI also has the effect of conferring the power to legislate directly on those Ministers in their domestic ministerial capacity.
To read the full reasoning behind the Committee’s decision to upgrade this instrument, read our 8th report here.

Further information

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