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Letters to the Serjeant at Arms Department

As many a policeman will testify, the bane of their working life is the vast amount of administration that is part of their schedule. But this is not just a modern phenomenon; if you did get the opportunity to rise up the ranks to the post of Chief Inspector in the Metropolitan police of the 1880s you would also be glued to an inkpot catching up on paperwork. Judging from his Occurence Books, Inspector Denning reveled in the administrative side of his role going beyond the call of duty to jot down every last detail in case it maybe of importance at a further date. In this 1883 letter, he wrote to the Serjeant at Arms requesting additional policing within the Palace of Westminster probably as a result of nefarious groups who sought to cause some form of civil disobedience in this tumultuous period. It's a great example of the diligence that Denning was renowned for as he made special specifications for greater security around the debating chambers which he felt was an area of great vulnerability to the members.