Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

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Written Statement Indentifying Number – Every written statement in the House of Commons and House of Lords has a WSID per parliamentary session.
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WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Lords

Provision of Security Assistance to Somalia

My Honourable Friend, the Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (Rory Stewart), has made the following has made the following written Ministerial statement:

The UK remains committed to building a stable, peaceful and prosperous future for Somalia. Instability in Somalia affects stability across East Africa – fuelling irregular migration and providing a foothold for terrorist groups such as Al Shabaab and Daesh. It is important that we maintain our support in order to tackle these shared threats to both the UK and the Somali people. This is why the British Government has announced a further £21m of support for security work in Somalia, and helped to agree the Security Pact at the London Somalia Conference earlier this year.

In the shorter-term, with the support of the Somali Government, the UK has funded the construction of a police training facility in Mogadishu at a cost of £1,767,016 which will shortly be handed over to the Somali Police Force. This facility has been funded by FCO policy programme funding. The development of security partners and Counter Terrorism (CT) policing in Somalia is vital to help ensure that the Somali authorities have the right tools to deploy in their ongoing fight against terrorism.

The provision of this facility is fully in line with the Government’s strategic CT objectives for East and South Africa. Using the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance guidance, FCO officials have also assessed the project for human rights risks, and concluded that the risk of such violations arising from the project’s delivery may be mitigated.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Amber Rudd (The Secretary of State for the Home Department)
Commons

Publications relating to the former independent reviewer of terrorist legislation

In November 2013, the then Home Secretary asked David Anderson QC to conduct a review of the framework of the UK’s Deportation with Assurances (DWA) policy, and to make recommendations on how the policy might be strengthened or improved, with particular emphasis on its legal aspects. I am pleased to be publishing his report today (Cm 9462). I can confirm that no redactions have been made to the report.

In accordance with section 36(5) of the Terrorism Act 2006, David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, prepared a report on the operation in 2015 of the Terrorism Act 2000 and Part 1 of the Terrorism Act 2006, which was laid before the House on 1 December 2016. I have carefully considered its recommendations and observations. I am today laying before the House the Government’s response (Cm 9489).

I am very grateful to David Anderson for his work on both reports

Copies of David Anderson’s report into DWA, and the Government’s response to his section 36(5) report will be available in the Vote Office and on GOV.UK.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS106
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Publications relating to the former independent reviewer of terrorist legislation

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Amber Rudd) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

In November 2013, the then Home Secretary asked David Anderson QC to conduct a review of the framework of the UK’s Deportation with Assurances (DWA) policy, and to make recommendations on how the policy might be strengthened or improved, with particular emphasis on its legal aspects. I am pleased to be publishing his report today (Cm 9462). I can confirm that no redactions have been made to the report.

In accordance with section 36(5) of the Terrorism Act 2006, David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, prepared a report on the operation in 2015 of the Terrorism Act 2000 and Part 1 of the Terrorism Act 2006, which was laid before the House on 1 December 2016. I have carefully considered its recommendations and observations. I am today laying before the House the Government’s response (Cm 9489).

I am very grateful to David Anderson for his work on both reports

Copies of David Anderson’s report into DWA, and the Government’s response to his section 36(5) report will be available in the Vote Office and on GOV.UK.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS105
WS
Scotland Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Viscount Younger of Leckie (The Lords Spokesperson (Scotland Office))
Lords

Edinburgh and South East Scotland City Region Deal

My Right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Scotland (David Mundell) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

In March 2016, the Government announced their intention to negotiate a city region deal for Edinburgh and South East Scotland. As well as deals across England and Wales, this follows the successful agreement of city region deals for Glasgow and Clyde Valley, Inverness and the Highlands and Aberdeen City Region.

I can today inform the House that the Government has reached agreement with the Scottish Government and regional partners on a Heads of Terms for a City Region Deal for Edinburgh and South East Scotland.

This deal will bring in excess of £1 billion of investment into the Scottish capital city region. Local partners’ aspirations are that this investment will create in excess of 21,000 good quality jobs.

Central to the investment is the UK Government contribution of up to £300 million, which is being matched by Scottish Government. This investment is expected to unlock a considerable further investment from the city-region’s universities, higher education sector and the private sector.

UK Government investment will support local partners in delivering their ambition to make Edinburgh a leader in data-driven innovation. Building on existing regional excellence in R&D and innovation, the investment will see significant investments in digital infrastructure and data storage as well as the development of five R&D hubs across the city-region. These hubs will focus on growth in key sectors of the local economy such as data science, robotics, financial services, creative tech and agri-tech.

We will also deliver our manifesto commitment to support a new concert hall in Edinburgh, meeting the need for a mid-sized venue in the city.

Projects and programmes announced in the Heads of Terms document will be subject to the development and approval of business cases. Moving forward, the Government will work with the Scottish Government and the civic, academic and business leaders of Edinburgh and South East Scotland to ensure the successful implementation of the deal.

This represents an important step in delivering the UK Government’s commitment to a city deal for each of Scotland’s cities, as we work to strengthen the Union and build a United Kingdom that works for everyone.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS103
WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Lord Young of Cookham (Lord in Waiting (Government Whip))
Lords

Cabinet Committees and Implementation Taskforces

The First Secretary of State and Minister for the Cabinet Office has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

Today the Government is publishing an updated list of Cabinet Committees and Implementation Taskforces.

Copies of the associated documents will be placed in the Library of House and published on Gov.uk.

WS
Department for Exiting the European Union
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Anelay of St Johns (The Minister of State at the Department for Exiting the European Union)
Lords

Appointment of new Bulgarian Commissioner to the European Commission

On 7 July 2017, the Council of the European Union supported the appointment of Ms Mariya Gabriel as the new Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society. The UK voted in favour of the appointment of Ms Gabriel as Commissioner. Ms Gabriel is scheduled to hold the post until 31 October 2019.

The Bulgarian Government nominated Ms Gabriel as Commissioner following the resignation of the previous commissioner for Bulgaria, Ms Kristalina Georgieva, in December 2016. Before her appointment, Ms Gabriel had been a member of the European Parliament since 2009.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS104
WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Lord Keen of Elie (The Lords Spokesperson, Ministry of Justice)
Lords

Update on the Lugano and Hague Conventions

My Right Honourable Friend, the Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor, has made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

“The United Kingdom has opted in to the following Council Decisions:

(i) Council Decision of 7 February 2013, authorising the opening of negotiations on agreements between the EU and Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Switzerland in the areas of cross-border service of judicial and non-judicial documents and the taking of evidence in civil and commercial proceedings. (Norway, Iceland and Switzerland are commonly referred to as the Lugano States).

The negotiating mandates set out the position of the EU in discussions on the prospects for agreements between those States in the areas of cross-border service of judicial and non-judicial documents and taking of evidence in civil and commercial proceedings.

There have been three rounds of discussions so far, and final agreements have yet to be reached. The decision of the then Government in 2013 to opt in to the negotiating mandates does not commit this Government to opt in to future EU agreements in these spheres. I will update the House as further information becomes available.

(ii) Council Decision authorising the opening of negotiations on a Convention on the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters (the Judgments Convention) in the framework of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

The negotiating mandate of May 2016 sets out the position of the EU in discussions at a Hague Conference level on the prospects for an international Convention which would set out rules for the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters, delivered by foreign courts.

Detailed discussions on the form of a Convention text began in June 2016 and will continue among EU Member States and at Hague Conference level for some time to come. The next Hague Conference Special Commission to discuss the project will take place in November 2017.

Opting in to the EU negotiating mandate does not commit the UK Government to accede to any future Convention.

Due to an oversight, a Written Ministerial Statement on these Council Decisions has not thus far been placed before both Houses, for which I apologise”.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS102
WS
Department for Exiting the European Union
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Mr Steve Baker (The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union)
Commons

Appointment of new Bulgarian Commissioner to the European Commission

My right hon. Friend, Baroness Anelay of St Johns DBE, Minister of State for Exiting the European Union, has made the following statement:

On 7 July 2017, the Council of the European Union supported the appointment of Ms Mariya Gabriel as the new Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society. The UK voted in favour of the appointment of Ms Gabriel as Commissioner. Ms Gabriel is scheduled to hold the post until 31 October 2019.

The Bulgarian Government nominated Ms Gabriel as Commissioner following the resignation of the previous commissioner for Bulgaria, Ms Kristalina Georgieva, in December 2016. Before her appointment, Ms Gabriel had been a member of the European Parliament since 2009.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS103
WS
Scotland Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: David Mundell (Secretary of State for Scotland )
Commons

Edinburgh and South East Scotland City Region Deal

In March 2016, the Government announced their intention to negotiate a city region deal for Edinburgh and South East Scotland. As well as deals across England and Wales, this follows the successful agreement of city region deals for Glasgow and Clyde Valley, Inverness and the Highlands and Aberdeen City Region.

I can today inform the House that the Government has reached agreement with the Scottish Government and regional partners on a Heads of Terms for a City Region Deal for Edinburgh and South East Scotland.

This deal will bring in excess of £1 billion of investment into the Scottish capital city region. Local partners’ aspirations are that this investment will create in excess of 21,000 good quality jobs.

Central to the investment is the UK Government contribution of up to £300 million, which is being matched by Scottish Government. This investment is expected to unlock a considerable further investment from the city-region’s universities, higher education sector and the private sector.

UK Government investment will support local partners in delivering their ambition to make Edinburgh a leader in data-driven innovation. Building on existing regional excellence in R&D and innovation, the investment will see significant investments in digital infrastructure and data storage as well as the development of five R&D hubs across the city-region. These hubs will focus on growth in key sectors of the local economy such as data science, robotics, financial services, creative tech and agri-tech.

We will also deliver our manifesto commitment to support a new concert hall in Edinburgh, meeting the need for a mid-sized venue in the city.

Projects and programmes announced in the Heads of Terms document will be subject to the development and approval of business cases. Moving forward, the Government will work with the Scottish Government and the civic, academic and business leaders of Edinburgh and South East Scotland to ensure the successful implementation of the deal.

This represents an important step in delivering the UK Government’s commitment to a city deal for each of Scotland’s cities, as we work to strengthen the Union and build a United Kingdom that works for everyone.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS105
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

European Union opt-in and opt-out Decision: Second Generation Schengen Information System

My hon Friend the Minister of State for Fire and Policing (Nick Hurd) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The Government has decided not to opt out of a new EU proposal for a Regulation governing the use of the Second Generation Schengen Information System (SIS II) for police and judicial cooperation purposes (“the draft Police Cooperation Regulation”), and not to opt in to a proposal for a Regulation on the use of SIS II for the return of illegally staying non-European Economic Area (EEA) nationals (“the draft Returns Regulation”).

SIS II is an EU-wide system that circulates alerts on people and objects that are of interest to law enforcement agencies across the EU. This includes people who are wanted for extradition on European Arrest Warrants, stolen vehicles, lost or cancelled travel documents and suspected criminals and terrorists on whom information is sought.

The Proposed Police Cooperation Regulation will replace the legislation that currently governs SIS II’s use for that purpose. The UK has participated in this aspect of SIS II since April 2015. Our law enforcement agencies benefit from this, for example by being able to detain at the border people who are wanted under European Arrest Warrants and to obtain intelligence from police forces across the EU on suspected criminals and security risks. The draft Regulation contains a number of proposals that would update SIS II’s capabilities, for example allowing it to store a wider range of biometric data and permitting alerts to be created to protect children who are at risk of going missing. There are some changes we will seek, in particular to maintain Member States’ control over when alerts are created, but the Government believes we will be in a better position to do this by not opting out and remaining full participants in the negotiation.

The Proposed Returns Regulation would allow Member States to use SIS II to circulate alerts on non-EEA nationals who have been made subject to removal decisions. Therefore, the UK will not opt in to the draft Returns Regulation.

The decisions announced here have no implications for our general opt out from the internal border-free zone established by Schengen.

Until the UK leaves the EU it remains a full member, and the Government will continue to consider the application of the UK’s right to opt in to, or opt out of, forthcoming EU legislation in the area of Justice and Home Affairs on a case by case basis, with a view to maximising our country’s security, protecting our civil liberties and enhancing our ability to control immigration.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS96
WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Mr David Lidington (The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice)
Commons

Update on the Lugano and Hague Conventions

“The United Kingdom has opted in to the following Council Decisions:

(i) Council Decision of 7 February 2013, authorising the opening of negotiations on agreements between the EU and Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Switzerland in the areas of cross-border service of judicial and non-judicial documents and the taking of evidence in civil and commercial proceedings. (Norway, Iceland and Switzerland are commonly referred to as the Lugano States).

The negotiating mandates set out the position of the EU in discussions on the prospects for agreements between those States in the areas of cross-border service of judicial and non-judicial documents and taking of evidence in civil and commercial proceedings.

There have been three rounds of discussions so far, and final agreements have yet to be reached. The decision of the then Government in 2013 to opt in to the negotiating mandates does not commit this Government to opt in to future EU agreements in these spheres. I will update the House as further information becomes available.

(ii) Council Decision authorising the opening of negotiations on a Convention on the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters (the Judgments Convention) in the framework of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

The negotiating mandate of May 2016 sets out the position of the EU in discussions at a Hague Conference level on the prospects for an international Convention which would set out rules for the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters, delivered by foreign courts.

Detailed discussions on the form of a Convention text began in June 2016 and will continue among EU Member States and at Hague Conference level for some time to come. The next Hague Conference Special Commission to discuss the project will take place in November 2017.

Opting in to the EU negotiating mandate does not commit the UK Government to accede to any future Convention.

Due to an oversight, a Written Ministerial Statement on these Council Decisions has not thus far been placed before both Houses, for which I apologise”.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS102
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Proposed Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Mutual Recognition of Freezing & Confiscation Orders COM (2016) 819 final

My hon Friend the Minister of State for Security (Ben Wallace) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The Government has decided that the UK will opt in to the Regulation on the Mutual Recognition of Freezing and Confiscation Orders.

The proposed Regulation would replace and build upon the existing mutual recognition framework which is currently in two existing instruments – the Council Framework Decision on the execution in the European Union of orders of freezing property of evidence (2003/577/JHA) and the Council Framework Decision (2006/783/JHA) on the application of the principle of mutual recognition to confiscation orders. These Framework Decisions were transposed into UK law in 2014.

Through our Serious Organised Crime Strategy and Action Plan for anti-money laundering and counter terrorist finance, we have made it clear that being able to recover criminal monies is a priority. The proposed Regulation will bring benefits to the UK through strengthening the ability of our operational agencies to have our orders recognised and executed, particularly in countries which have traditionally been slower to assist in cross border asset recovery cases.

The UK’s experience of the existing Framework Decisions has been positive, although numbers of mutual recognition requests are limited due to the short time (since 2014) that the Decisions have been fully transposed in UK law. Asset recovery in some EU states has traditionally been difficult through mutual legal assistance routes, which are lengthy and cumbersome.

Opting into this measure is also consistent with the UK’s approach to participating in EU mutual recognition measures to improve practical cooperation between Member States. Opting in at this point shows our continued positive engagement with this measure, and demonstrates our commitment to work together with our European partners to fight crime and prevent terrorism now and after we leave the European Union.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS101
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Lord Nash (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the School System)
Lords

Post 16 Education

My right honourable friend the Minister of State for School Standards (Nick Gibb) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

"Today the Government is publishing Professor Sir Adrian Smith’s authoritative and wide-ranging review of 16-18 mathematics education in England.

The government is determined to give all young people the world-class education they need to fulfil their potential. This includes providing opportunities to develop the mathematical and quantitative knowledge and skills appropriate to their chosen careers. In an increasingly technological world this will be vital to ensuring that our future workforce will be productive and competitive in the global marketplace.

Sir Adrian Smith’s review identifies a strong economic and social mobility case for raising participation in post-16 mathematics and improving knowledge and skills at all levels. He presents clear evidence for the value of mathematical and quantitative skills to students, whichever route they take.

The report includes recommendations and challenges that are wide-ranging – for example, the need to address negative cultural perceptions of mathematics. Thesel issues will require detailed engagement and action between government, industry, universities, schools and colleges.

I have today written to Sir Adrian thanking him for the review and confirming that the Government will set out our plans across the range of Sir Adrian’s recommendations in due course. The letter confirms that work is already underway to address a number of the challenges highlighted in the report, and there are a number of recommendations where we have been able to take immediate action.

We agree with Sir Adrian that we must be ambitious and take greater action to encourage and support more young people to choose mathematics post-16, particularly in areas where take-up is low. That is why one of the immediate actions we are taking today is to announce a new £16m Level 3 Maths Support Programme. It will build on the momentum created by the Further Mathematics and Core Maths Support Programmes, and will work with schools and colleges to improve mathematics education by sharing best practice, and delivering knowledge-rich curriculum materials, as well as working to increase participation and attainment in 16-18 mathematics. The programme will work to deliver focused intervention targeted to those who need it most.

The other immediate actions we have taken in response to Sir Adrian’s recommendations are set out in my letter. For example, taking forward work on the new T level qualifications to ensure they include mathematics where employers identify this as a requirement for employment; working with the newly constituted Royal Society Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education to ensure appropriate expert advice. We are alsoworking with institutions such as the Royal Society and British Academy to encourage universities and employers to signal the value of level 3 mathematics qualifications for entry to undergraduate courses with a significant quantitative element and for a wide range of job roles.

We have placed a copy of Sir Adrian’s report and our letter in the libraries of the House and on the government’s website."

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS99
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (01 March 2017 to 31 May 2017)

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Amber Rudd) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

Section 19(1) of the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Act 2011 (the Act) requires the Secretary of State to report to Parliament as soon as reasonably practicable after the end of every relevant three-month period on the exercise of her TPIM powers under the Act during that period.

The level of information provided will always be subject to slight variations based on operational advice.

TPIM notices in force (as of 31 May 2017)

6

TPIM notices in respect of British citizens (as of 31 May 2017)

5

TPIM notices extended (during the reporting period)

0

TPIM notices revoked (during the reporting period)

1

TPIM notices revived (during the reporting period)

1

Variations made to measures specified in TPIM notices (during

the reporting period)

10

Applications to vary measures specified in TPIM notices

refused (during the reporting period)

3

The number of current subjects relocated under TPIM legislation

(as of 31 May 2017)

6

The TPIM Review Group (TRG) keeps every TPIM notice under regular and formal review. The most recent TRG meetings took place on 26 and 30 June, and 3 and 4 July.

The case of Secretary of State for the Home Department v EC and EG [2017] EWHC 795 (Admin) was heard again at the High Court between 24 January and 2 February 2017. In a judgment handed down on 11 April 2017 Mr Justice Collins upheld the Secretary of State’s decision to impose a TPIM notice on EC and EG. This judgement can be found at www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2017/795.html.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS98
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Introduction of a modified process for newly naturalised passport applicants

My rt hon Friend the Minister of State for Immigration (Brandon Lewis) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I am writing to advise you that Her Majesty’s Passport Office are introducing changes to their interviewing processes.

HM Passport Office reserves the right to call any passport applicant for an identity interview. However, where the identity of a newly naturalised British citizen can be confirmed using records already held by UK Visas & Immigration, they will not be routinely required to attend an interview as part of their first UK passport application.

The new process maintains our high standards of identity assurance but removes an unnecessary burden on newly naturalised citizens by no longer requiring them to confirm their identity twice to the Home Office before being issued with a UK passport.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS97
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Proposed Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Mutual Recognition of Freezing & Confiscation Orders COM (2016) 819 final

The Government has decided that the UK will opt in to the Regulation on the Mutual Recognition of Freezing and Confiscation Orders.

The proposed Regulation would replace and build upon the existing mutual recognition framework which is currently in two existing instruments – the Council Framework Decision on the execution in the European Union of orders of freezing property of evidence (2003/577/JHA) and the Council Framework Decision (2006/783/JHA) on the application of the principle of mutual recognition to confiscation orders. These Framework Decisions were transposed into UK law in 2014.

Through our Serious Organised Crime Strategy and Action Plan for anti-money laundering and counter terrorist finance, we have made it clear that being able to recover criminal monies is a priority. The proposed Regulation will bring benefits to the UK through strengthening the ability of our operational agencies to have our orders recognised and executed, particularly in countries which have traditionally been slower to assist in cross border asset recovery cases.

The UK’s experience of the existing Framework Decisions has been positive, although numbers of mutual recognition requests are limited due to the short time (since 2014) that the Decisions have been fully transposed in UK law. Asset recovery in some EU states has traditionally been difficult through mutual legal assistance routes, which are lengthy and cumbersome.

Opting into this measure is also consistent with the UK’s approach to participating in EU mutual recognition measures to improve practical cooperation between Member States. Opting in at this point shows our continued positive engagement with this measure, and demonstrates our commitment to work together with our European partners to fight crime and prevent terrorism now and after we leave the European Union.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS100
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules

My rt hon Friend the Minister of State for Immigration (Brandon Lewis) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

My rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today laying before the House a Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules (HC 290).

The purpose of the changes is to give effect to the Supreme Court judgment in MM (Lebanon) & Others, handed down on 22 February 2017.

The changes, together with changes to the Secretary of State’s guidance to decision-makers, are intended to give effect to the judgment’s findings in respect of, firstly, the income sources which may be relied upon to meet the minimum income requirement in specified exceptional circumstances; and, secondly, the duty to have regard to the welfare of children under section 55 of the Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009. They also make other minor amendments and clarifications to the family Immigration Rules.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS95
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office )
Lords

Publication of Annual JHA Opt-in Reports to Parliament

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Amber Rudd) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The Home Office and Ministry of Justice have prepared the Sixth and Seventh Annual Reports to Parliament on the Application of Protocols 19 and 21 to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) (‘the Treaties’) in Relation to EU Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) Matters (Cm 9488). The Reports, which are today being laid before the House, are submitted on behalf of both my own Department and that of the Justice Secretary. Copies of the Command Paper are available from the Vote Office and on Gov.uk.

On 9 June 2008, the then Leader of the House of Lords committed to table a report in Parliament each year setting out the decisions taken by the Government in accordance with Protocol 21 (‘the Justice and Home Affairs opt-in Protocol’) and to make that report available for debate. These commitments were designed to ensure that the views of the Scrutiny Committees should inform the Government’s decision-making process.

The Sixth Report covers decisions taken over the period 1 December 2014 – 30 November 2015. In that period, decisions on UK participation in 23 EU JHA legislative proposals have been taken. The UK has decided to opt in under the JHA opt-in Protocol in 11 cases and has decided not to opt in in 13 cases (this includes one decision on an international agreement where the UK opted into one set of JHA provisions in the measure, and did not opt into another). The Government has not asserted the Schengen opt-out to any proposals during that period.

The Seventh Report covers decisions taken over the period 1 December 2015 – 30 November 2016. In that period, decisions on UK participation in 36 EU JHA legislative proposals have been taken. The UK has decided to opt in under the JHA opt-in Protocol in 12 cases and has decided not to opt in in 24 cases. The Government has not asserted the Schengen opt-out to any proposals during that period.

These opt-in decisions are without prejudice to discussions on the UK’s future relationship with the EU. The UK’s relationship with the EU will change as a result of leaving the EU, however, the UK retains the rights and obligations of membership of the EU whilst we remain a member.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS94
WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Lords

EU-Canada Strategic Partnership Agreement

My right Honourable Friend, the Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (Sir Alan Duncan), has made the following written Ministerial statement:

The Government wishes to inform the House of its decision to opt in to the Council Decision on Conclusion of the EU-Canada Strategic Partnership Agreement (SPA), in respect of Article 18(2) of the Agreement, which relates to judicial cooperation in the field of civil and commercial matters. This article falls within Title V of Part III of the Treaty on the functioning of the European Union.

The SPA, a framework political agreement, will update the previous EU-Canada 1976 Framework Agreement for commercial and economic cooperation between the European Communities and Canada. It has two aims: i) to enhance EU-Canada political ties and cooperation on foreign and security policy issues; and ii) to upgrade cooperation on a wide range of other areas. The SPA, though not technically linked to the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA), is complementary and will provide wider benefits to the EU-Canada relationship.

The SPA has been under negotiation between the EU, its Member States and Canada, since 2011. The draft Council Decision on Conclusion issued on Thursday 24 November 2016. Notwithstanding the result of the referendum on EU membership the Government consider that it is in the UK’s interests to opt in to Article 18(2) of this Agreement at the Conclusion stage of the SPA negotiations. Article 18(2) of the agreement provides for judicial cooperation in civil and commercial matters. While it is not specific about the type of cooperation that might be envisaged, the Government believes that it is beneficial for the UK to be involved in any such work between the EU and one of our closest Commonwealth partners whilst we remain a member of the European Union.

We do not expect the Council Decision on Conclusion to be adopted until all Member States have ratified the SPA.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Home Office Science Advisory Non-Departmental Public Bodies

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Amber Rudd) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

On 21 July 2014, my predecessor, Home Secretary Theresa May, announced in Parliament, through a Written Ministerial Statement, the commencement of the triennial review of the Home Office Science Advisory Non-Departmental Public Bodies: the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD); the Animals in Science Committee (ASC); and the National DNA Database Ethics Group (NDNADEG). I am now pleased to announce the completion of the review.

The ACMD, ASC and NDNADEG are independent bodies that advise ministers on scientific issues.

The review concludes that the functions performed by the ACMD, the ASC and the NDNADEG are still required and that they should be retained as non-departmental public bodies. The review concludes that the control and governance arrangements are robust and compliant with the principles set out in the Principles of Good Corporate Governance for Advisory NDPBs, the Code of Practice for Scientific Advisory NDPBs and the Principles of Scientific Advice to Government.

The review recommends that the remit of the NDNADEG should be extended to cover the ethical issues associated with all forensic identification techniques including facial recognition technology and fingerprinting, and the collection and retention of biometric data. This recommendation has been accepted and therefore the name of the NDNADEG will change to the Biometrics and Forensics Ethics Group. The review also makes two recommendations in relation to accountability of Ministers for the bodies: that the Chair of the NDNADEG should meet a Home Office Minister in the next twelve months; and an annual report should be published for the ASC and ACMD. Both recommendations have been accepted.

The full report of the triennial review of the ACMD, the ASC and the NDNADEG can be found on the GOV.UK website and copies have been placed in the House Library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS92
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