Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Melanie Onn
(Great Grimsby)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2017
Ministry of Justice
Offences against Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will seek to quash convictions for child prostitution of any victim of child abuse.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 22 September 2017

There is not an offence of child prostitution. Section 1 of the Street Offences Act was amended by section 68(7) of the Serious Crime Act 2015 so that the offence of loitering or soliciting applies only to persons aged 18 or over. In so doing, it recognises children as victims in such circumstances.

Before the statutory amendment was introduced the legislation applied equally to adults and children, although policing guidance and legal guidance to prosecutors advised that it was not in the public interest to prosecute anyone under the age of 18. The legislation in 2015 confirmed the position in law.

The Secretary of State does not have the power to quash a conviction and there are currently no plans to extend the statutory pardon scheme for historical criminal convictions, including those for child prostitution.

Q
Asked by Jeremy Lefroy
(Stafford)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) pieces of unlawful terrorist material have been taken off the internet, (b) hate preachers have been excluded from the UK, (c) organisations have been proscribed in the UK, (d) British citizenships have been revoked and (e) passports removed for terrorism-related reasons since May 2015; and how many arrests the police have made for terrorism-related offences since May 2015.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 22 September 2017

Following referrals from the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed 280,000 pieces of illegal terrorist material since February 2010. Between 11 May 2010 and 31 December 2015, the Government excluded 181 people from the United Kingdom, including 69 exclusions on national security grounds.

There were 26 exclusions made between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2015. 71 international terrorist organisations and a further 14 in Northern Ireland, have been proscribed. The Government Transparency Report, published on 23 February 2017, showed that the Royal Prerogative had been used to cancel or refuse applications for passports 23 times in 2015. Figures are not yet available for 2016. From March 2015 to March 2017 there have been 562 arrests for terrorism related offences.

Q
(East Londonderry)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 September 2017
Northern Ireland Office
Flood Control: Northern Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what additional steps the Government plans to take in Northern Ireland to mitigate the risk of flooding as a result of recent flooding in the north-west of Northern Ireland.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 22 September 2017
Holding answer received on 11 September 2017

The recent flooding in the north west of Northern Ireland has been devastating for many people and it is important that householders, farmers and businesses are assisted to get back on their feet as soon as possible.

Decisions surrounding flood support and mitigation are a devolved matter for the NI Executive. The UK Government stands ready to respond to any requests for support from The Executive Office. My colleague Lord Bourne visited the north-west of Northern Ireland on the 18 September to see some of the repair work being carried out and to talk to a number of those worst affected by the flooding.

Q
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Home Office
Offenders: Deportation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individuals who were serving custodial sentences and were recommended for deportation on release, have been deported in each of the last five years.
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The Home Office routinely publishes figures on the total number of foreign national offenders that have been removed. The figures can be found at ‘Returns data tables – immigration statistics April to June 2017 volume 5 – rt_06_q’ when accessing the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

Figures in include enforced removals and voluntary returns.A foreign national offender (FNO) is someone who:(a) is not a British citizen; and (b) is/was convicted in the UK or abroad of any criminal offence.

Following the introduction of Association of Chief Police Officers Criminal Records Office (ACRO) cases, the FNO returns figure has included cases where foreign nationals who had a criminal conviction in another country, were picked up by police in the UK, and subsequently returned from the UK. In addition, these people could also have a UK conviction. This case type is now sufficiently well established to warrant separate identification in the statistical series. These figures are a count of an administrative process and, as such, are provisional and will be revised in line with the existing series. Those with an overseas criminal record may also have a UK criminal record.

Q
(Kingston and Surbiton)
Asked on: 08 September 2017
Home Office
Borders: Personal Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of how many non-EU international students left the UK on the basis of exit check data collected between April 2015 and April 2016.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 22 September 2017

Analysis on Exit Checks data was published on 24 August 2017 in the Home Office’s ‘Second report on statistics being collected under the exit checks programme’ (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/second-report-on-statistics-being-collected-under-the-exit-checks-programme). This is the second report in a programme of work to develop experimental statistics and the first time that it has been possible to present results from the analysis of exit data. However, our understanding of this new data source is still developing and as the report sets out there are a variety of reasons why the data does not yet provide a complete estimate of the number of departures.

Additional information on international student departures relating to 2015/16 is also contained in ONS’s ‘International student migration research update: August 2017’ report https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/articles/internationalstudentmigrationresearchupdate/august2017

Asked on: 08 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animal Welfare: Prosecutions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prosecutions have been brought under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in each of the last five years for which figures are available; and how many prosecutions were successful in each of those years.
A
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts for offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, in England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016, can be viewed in the table below.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts for the Animal Welfare Act 2006 (1), England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016 (2)(3)(4)

Outcome

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Proceeded against

1,999

1,897

1,523

1,188

1,039

Found Guilty

1,535

1,435

1,161

899

807

Sentenced

1,533

1,431

1,159

902

807

of which

Immediate custody

118

107

97

84

71

of which

up to 3 months

44

42

44

32

29

3 months and up to six

71

59

52

45

38

Six months

3

6

1

7

4

(1) Includes offences under SS 4, 5, 6(1),6(2) 7, 8, 9, 13(6) and 34(9)

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

(4) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown Court, nay be sentenced in the following year.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services – Ministry of Justice.

Ref: PQ HL 1469 1470

Grouped Questions: HL1470
Asked on: 08 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animal Welfare: Convictions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many custodial sentences were given as a result of prosecutions brought under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in each of the last five years for which figures are available; and what was the length of each such custodial sentence awarded.
A
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts for offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, in England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016, can be viewed in the table below.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty and sentenced at all courts for the Animal Welfare Act 2006 (1), England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016 (2)(3)(4)

Outcome

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Proceeded against

1,999

1,897

1,523

1,188

1,039

Found Guilty

1,535

1,435

1,161

899

807

Sentenced

1,533

1,431

1,159

902

807

of which

Immediate custody

118

107

97

84

71

of which

up to 3 months

44

42

44

32

29

3 months and up to six

71

59

52

45

38

Six months

3

6

1

7

4

(1) Includes offences under SS 4, 5, 6(1),6(2) 7, 8, 9, 13(6) and 34(9)

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

(4) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown Court, nay be sentenced in the following year.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services – Ministry of Justice.

Ref: PQ HL 1469 1470

Grouped Questions: HL1469
Q
Asked by Baroness Cox
Asked on: 08 September 2017
Home Office
Money Laundering: Azerbaijan
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in the light of the statement by the Prime Minister’s spokesman on 5 September that information relating to the Azerbaijani Laundromat scheme received from the media would be examined by the National Crime Agency (NCA), whether they have asked (1) the NCA, or (2) a financial regulator, to examine allegations relating to UK-registered companies and partnerships.
Answered on: 22 September 2017

Investigations into allegations of money laundering are conducted by law enforcement agencies such as the National Crime Agency, the Serious Fraud Office, and the police. Decision in whether to investigate and how to do so is purely a matter for law enforcement. The NCA, SFO, and the police of are operationally independent of the Government.

Asked on: 08 September 2017
Home Office
Jeremy Bamber
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that the Chief Constable of Essex complies with requests from Jeremy Bamber's legal team, and with court orders made in 1994, 2001 and 2002, to provide non-disclosed evidence in relation to the murders at White House Farm in Essex in 1985.
Answered on: 22 September 2017

Police forces are operationally independent of government and decisions around the management and handling of a police investigation fall under the direction and control of the Chief Officer of the force concerned.

Asked on: 08 September 2017
Home Office
Jeremy Bamber
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have complied in full with the order issued by the Central Criminal Court in 1994, as a result of a Judicial Review initiated by lawyers acting for Jeremy Bamber, instructing the then Home Secretary to disclose all DNA evidence from Essex Police in relation to the White House Farm murders in Essex in 1985.
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The Home Office complied with the order as set out in paragraph 163 of the judgement in the Court of Appeal case of R V JEREMY BAMBER Neutral Citation Number: [2002] EWCA Crim 2912 Case No: 20011745 S1.

Q
(Kettering)
Asked on: 11 September 2017
Attorney General
Offences against Children: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, if he will ensure that the Crown Prosecution Service always considers that racial motivation may be an aggravating factor for seeking higher sentences for conviction for child abuse.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The Sentencing Council has issued a definitive guideline on the sentencing of sexual offences. Racial aggravation increases an offender’s culpability under the guideline and therefore the starting point and sentence range for the court to consider.

Prosecutors should assist the Court as necessary during the sentencing process, including drawing the Court’s attention to any relevant sentencing guidelines and the aggravating and mitigating features of the case.

Ultimately, sentencing is a matter for the court. Racial aggravation makes an offence more serious and the court has a duty to take this into account when it sentences a defendant.

Q
Asked by Lord Fink
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Home Office
Aviation: Lasers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been arrested on suspicion of endangering an aircraft with a laser pointer under the Aviation and Safety Act 1982 within the last 12 months.
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of arrests broken down by offence group and police force area. These data are published in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletins, and data can be accessed here: www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2016

Data presented here are on the police power of arrest. In line with police recorded crime statistics, these data cover arrests for all notifiable offences carried out by police in England and Wales

Q
Asked by Lord Naseby
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Ministry of Defence
Caribbean: Hurricanes and Tornadoes
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the complement of disaster relief equipment carried by Royal Fleet Auxiliary Mount Bay; and in particular, how many (1) helicopters, (2) tractors, (3) bulldozers, (4) other vehicles, and (5) items of heavy lifting equipment are being carried.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 22 September 2017

Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) MOUNTS BAY is currently carrying the following equipment while conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in the Caribbean:

1 Wildcat helicopter

1 Mexflote raft

1 Combat support boat

2 Pacific 24 rigid inflatable boats

2 Inflatable raiding crafts

2 Medium wheeled tractors

2 Support Vehicles (15 tonne)

1 Rough terrain forklift

1 Light wheeled tractor

2 Quad bikes with trailers

2 Pinzgauer soft top all-terrain vehicles

1 Self loading dump truck

2 Bandvagn 206D flatbeds

1 Support Vehicle (six tonne)

1 Land Rover & trailer

1 King Trailer

This amounts to one helicopter, four tractors, zero bulldozers, 15 other vehicles and three items of heavy lifting equipment.

HMS OCEAN is also due to arrive in the region by 23 September with three Wildcat, four Merlin and two Chinook helicopters and 60 tonnes of Department for International Development supplies onboard to assist with the longer-term recovery effort. HMS OCEAN will be deployed according to need once Hurricane Maria has passed.

Q
Asked by Lord Beith
Asked on: 14 September 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Religious Buildings: Repairs and Maintenance
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of (1) the Heritage Lottery Fund's Grants for Places of Worship scheme, and (2) the future need to support religious buildings of historic or architectural significance.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The Heritage Lottery Fund operates at arm’s length from Government and any assessment of what their Grants for Places of Worship programme has achieved is for them to make.

The English Churches and Cathedrals Sustainability Review was announced in 2016 and tasked with delivering a report and recommendations to the Chancellor and Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. This Review has yet to report, however its findings will help to inform any future assessment by Government of the need to support religious buildings of historic or architectural significance.

Q
Asked by Lord Laird
Asked on: 14 September 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Data Protection: USA
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received a legal opinion on the Privacy Shield framework between the EU and the US; whether they have taken independent legal advice on that framework; if so, what was the content of that (1) opinion, and (2) advice; and whether they will place a copy of that (1) opinion, and (2) advice in the Library of the House.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 22 September 2017

The Government has no intention of commenting on or publishing any legal advice that may have been received on these matters.

Q
Asked by Lord Laird
Asked on: 14 September 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Data Protection: USA
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to implement the judgment and findings of the European Court of Justice in Schrems v Data Protection Commissioner.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 22 September 2017

In October 2015, the European Commission's adequacy decision on the Safe Harbor Agreement was invalidated by the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) in the Schrems case. The Court ​considered that the third country concerned must ensure an adequate level of protection safeguarded by its domestic law or international commitments, and that the reliability of such a system, in light of that requirement, is founded essentially on the establishment of effective detection and supervision mechanisms in relation to the protection of fundamental rights. ​Consequently, the Court found that the Safe Harbor Agreement failed to comply with the requirements of Directive 95/46/EC and established Human Rights law. The judgment was addressed to the Commission. The EU-US Privacy Shield decision has since replaced the Safe Harbor agreement, in providing a basis for personal data transfers from the US to the US companies certified under the scheme.

The Information Commissioner has provided regular updates to the status of the Privacy Shield and remains an active member of the Article 29 Working Party Privacy Shield annual joint review team.

Q
Asked by Deidre Brock
(Edinburgh North and Leith)
Asked on: 06 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Department for Communities and Local Government: Advertising
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much his Department has spent on advertising on social media in each month since January 2016.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 21 September 2017

Since January 2016 the Department for Communities and Local Government spent the following amount on social media:

Month

Gross Spend (ex VAT & commission)

Jan-16

£ 9,369

Feb-16

£ 24,287

Mar-16

£ 31,053

Apr-16

£ 7,161

May-16

£ 4,729

Jun-16

£ 13,792

Jul-16

£ 2,768

Aug-16

£ 8,672

Sep-16

£ 10,461

Oct-16

£ 23,022

Nov-16

£ 19,622

Dec-16

£ 4,029

Jan-17

£ 13,037

Feb-17

£ 37,228

Mar-17

£ 134,752

Apr-17

£ 49,037

May-17

£ 11,782

Total Spend

£ 404,802

These figures represent gross social media advertising spend excluding fees, commission and VAT. ‘Social’ channels are defined as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. These figures represent total spend for DCLG, excluding its arm’s length bodies (ALBs).

Government advertising supports the government’s priorities and helps deliver its programmes, from raising awareness of government home buying schemes so people can own their own home, to informing voters of the combined authority regional mayoral elections held in May 2017 to help increase turnout. The media in which we place government advertising are selected for their ability to most effectively reach our target audience.

Government advertising is purchased by our media buying agency, Carat Ltd. Carat has held the contract for UK government media buying since January 2015.

Q
Asked by Layla Moran
(Oxford West and Abingdon)
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of schools in (a) England and (b) each local authority in England that carry an in-year deficit for each of the last (i) two, (ii) three, (iii) four and (iv) five years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 21 September 2017

The Government want schools to have the resources they need to deliver a high quality education for their pupils. This is why we have announced that under the national funding formula there will be an additional £1.3 billion for schools and high needs across 2018-19 and 2019-20, on top of existing spending plans. This means that core funding for schools and high needs will rise from almost £41 billion in 2017-18 to £42.4 billion in 2018-19. In 2019-20, this will rise again to £43.5 billion.

On the latest available data, for 2015-16, the total number of local authority maintained schools in England with a cumulative budgetary surplus was 15,621 and the average surplus per local authority maintained school was £141,264.

For academies, we collect cumulative budgetary surplus data at trust level – in 2015/16 the total number of single academy trusts (SATs) in cumulative surplus was 1,735 and the total number of multi academy trusts (MATs) in cumulative surplus was 1,084. The median cumulative surplus for academy trusts (of which a higher proportion are secondary schools than is the case for maintained schools) was £364,000 for SATs and £664,000 for MATs.

The total number of schools in England with an in year deficit in each of the last five years can be found in the table attached (Annex A). It is important to note that an in year deficit is not in itself a cause for concern unless it is symptomatic of a trend towards a cumulative deficit. Many schools will draw on their reserves for a range of planned reasons – for example to spend on capital projects.

The total number of schools in England that carried an in year deficit for each of the last (i) two, (ii) three, (iii) four and (iv) five years can be found in the table attached

(Annex B).

The breakdown at local authority level for local authority maintained schools (for each of these areas) and academies (for in year deficits) can be determined using the local authority and school expenditure data, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-local-authority-school-finance-data, and is summarised in the spreadsheet attached (Annex C).

The Department collects data on cumulative surpluses for academies at trust level only. As schools managed by MATs do not necessarily fall within the same local authority area, we are unable to present the data broken down by local authority.

Annex_A_and_Annex_B (Word Document, 12.92 KB)
Annex_C (Excel SpreadSheet, 48.8 KB)
Grouped Questions: 6641 | 6605
Q
Asked by Layla Moran
(Oxford West and Abingdon)
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of schools in (a) England and (b) each local authority in England that were in-year deficit in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 21 September 2017

The Government want schools to have the resources they need to deliver a high quality education for their pupils. This is why we have announced that under the national funding formula there will be an additional £1.3 billion for schools and high needs across 2018-19 and 2019-20, on top of existing spending plans. This means that core funding for schools and high needs will rise from almost £41 billion in 2017-18 to £42.4 billion in 2018-19. In 2019-20, this will rise again to £43.5 billion.

On the latest available data, for 2015-16, the total number of local authority maintained schools in England with a cumulative budgetary surplus was 15,621 and the average surplus per local authority maintained school was £141,264.

For academies, we collect cumulative budgetary surplus data at trust level – in 2015/16 the total number of single academy trusts (SATs) in cumulative surplus was 1,735 and the total number of multi academy trusts (MATs) in cumulative surplus was 1,084. The median cumulative surplus for academy trusts (of which a higher proportion are secondary schools than is the case for maintained schools) was £364,000 for SATs and £664,000 for MATs.

The total number of schools in England with an in year deficit in each of the last five years can be found in the table attached (Annex A). It is important to note that an in year deficit is not in itself a cause for concern unless it is symptomatic of a trend towards a cumulative deficit. Many schools will draw on their reserves for a range of planned reasons – for example to spend on capital projects.

The total number of schools in England that carried an in year deficit for each of the last (i) two, (ii) three, (iii) four and (iv) five years can be found in the table attached

(Annex B).

The breakdown at local authority level for local authority maintained schools (for each of these areas) and academies (for in year deficits) can be determined using the local authority and school expenditure data, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-local-authority-school-finance-data, and is summarised in the spreadsheet attached (Annex C).

The Department collects data on cumulative surpluses for academies at trust level only. As schools managed by MATs do not necessarily fall within the same local authority area, we are unable to present the data broken down by local authority.

Annex_A_and_Annex_B (Word Document, 12.92 KB)
Annex_C (Excel SpreadSheet, 48.8 KB)
Grouped Questions: 6642 | 6605
Q
Asked by Layla Moran
(Oxford West and Abingdon)
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Secondary Education: Children in Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many looked-after children in England were not offered a place at their first choice of secondary school in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 21 September 2017

The Department publishes figures annually on the applications and offers made for a secondary or primary school place through the coordinated admissions process. Offers are made on the respective national offer days of 1 March (secondary) and 16 April (primary).

The collection records the offers made on national offer day, by whether that offer was of the applicant’s first preference, second preference etc. It does not record whether the offer was accepted or refused.

The school admissions code requires schools to set an oversubscription criteria and to give the highest priority to looked after and previously looked after children. However, the criteria under which an offer was made is not collected.

Figures for the number of applicants receiving, an offer of their first preference school, or an offer of one of their top three preference school for the last five years are attached.[1]

[1] Published in the underlying data of the annual statistical release ‘Secondary and primary school applications and offers’ available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-applications.

Grouped Questions: 6633
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