Social sciences

child in handcuffs

In 2013, in partnership with University College London (UCL) and with funding from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for three years, POST established a dedicated Social Science Section. The aim of this was to provide parliamentarians with more access to social science research evidence and to run a study on the use of research evidence within Parliament.

POST has been awarded a further three years funding from ESRC to continue the existing partnership with UCL until 2019. The aims of this phase are to: continue to embed the social sciences across POST’s work programme; maintain a social science stream of work, including support to Select Committees; and to use the findings from the research study to inform POST’s activities. The Social Science Section will also focus on capacity building opportunities around the use of research and facilitating academic engagement.

Current work on POSTnotes and POSTbriefs

Evidence on effective approaches to relationship and sex education

This POSTnote will review national and international evidence on the effectiveness of different approaches and methods of relationship and sex education in schools.

Clinical Trials Regulation in the UK

A POSTnote describing the new EU Clinical Trial Regulation that is due to come into force in late 2018

Comparing economic and behavioural interventions

This POSTnote will look at the use of behavioural interventions in government.

Parental Alcohol Misuse and Children

This POSTnote will look at parental alcohol misuse in the UK and its effects on children.

Housing Quality and Health in the Private Rented Sector

This POSTnote will look at the effect of quality of housing in the private rented sector in England.

Meet the advisers

  • Abbi Hobbs

    Abbi has a PhD in Science and Technology Studies from the University of York. Prior to joining POST, she worked for the Academy of Medical Sciences, and as an independent consultant on several social science research projects in science policy and health.

  • Caroline Kenny

    Caroline has a PhD in Political Science from the University of Birmingham. Prior to joining POST, she worked at the Institute of Education, University of London studying the use of research in policy and practice and has supported policy-makers and practitioners from across the UK and Europe to use research in their decision making.

  • Sarah Foxen

    Sarah recently left the University of Exeter, where her PhD research focused on the interaction between language and identity. Having previously completed an AHRC fellowship with POST, she rejoins us as a Social Science Adviser, her focus being increasing Parliament’s engagement with academia.