Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

Show
Find by:
Close

WSID

Written Statement Indentifying Number – Every written statement in the House of Commons and House of Lords has a WSID per parliamentary session.
Showing 21-40 out of 353
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all statements
Print selected
WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Boris Johnson (The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (Iran nuclear deal)

Her Majesty’s Government has taken note of President Trump’s decision not to recertify the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action to Congress and, along with France, Germany and our other international partners, is concerned by the implications.

Her Majesty’s Government is strongly committed to the Iran nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPoA. This deal represents the culmination of 13 years of diplomacy and was a major step towards ensuring that Iran’s nuclear programme is only for peaceful purposes. The JCPoA contributes to the United Kingdom’s wider non-proliferation objectives and strengthens the international framework in this regard.

The Government remains of the firm view that the deal is in the security interests of the United Kingdom and the wider region and is, most importantly, working to constrain Iran’s nuclear ambitions. The International Atomic Energy Agency has released eight reports on Iran's nuclear programme since Implementation Day of the JCPoA in January 2016. In our role as a member of the Joint Commission, the body set up to implement the deal, consisting of the E3+3 (UK, France, Germany, China, Russia, US) and Iran, and coordinated by the European Union, we have held Iran to account and urged continued compliance. Where Iran has previously pushed the boundaries of the deal, it has taken steps to remain in compliance. The most recent report of the International Atomic Energy Agency in August 2017 confirmed that Iran continues to comply with its nuclear related commitments under the JCPoA.

However, the Government shares serious concerns about Iran’s ballistic missile programme and its destabilising activity in the region. Addressing these issues is a fundamental part of the Government’s policy towards Iran and we will consider further appropriate measures. The nuclear deal does not prevent us from tackling these issues. On the contrary, removing the most dangerous threat of nuclear weapons allows us to focus our efforts on challenging on the other areas of Iran's destabilising activity.

In parallel to agreeing the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action in July 2015, Her Majesty’s Government has been rebuilding bilateral relations with Iran in order to address issues of disagreement as well as discuss areas of agreement and cooperation. Both the United Kingdom and Iran reopened Embassies in London and Tehran in August 2015 and we upgraded to Ambassadorial relations in September 2016. We remain very concerned about dual British-Iranian nationals who are detained in Iran and on whose cases we continue to press for improvement at the highest levels. Both the Prime Minister and Foreign Secretary have raised these cases personally with their Iranian counterparts and will continue to do so.

Her Majesty’s Government will continue to make the case for the JCPoA with its partners, including the United States, and is committed to ensuring its success in delivering both our security objectives and delivering sanctions relief for the Iranian people, while we also work to tackle our broader concerns. The Government is encouraging the US Administration and Congress to consider the implications to the security of the US and its allies before taking any further steps that might undermine or weaken the JCPoA.

WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Sir Alan Duncan (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

Foreign Affairs Council (16 October)

My Right Honourable Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs will attend the Foreign Affairs Council on 16 October. The Foreign Affairs Council will be chaired by the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini. The meeting will be held in Luxembourg.

Foreign Affairs Council

The agenda for the Foreign Affairs Council (FAC) is expected to include Iran, Democratic Republic of Korea (DPRK), Turkey and Human Rights. Hungary has indicated that it will raise under Any Other Business its concerns over recent amendments to Ukraine’s Education Law.

Iran

Ministers will discuss the latest developments regarding the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. The UK fully supports full implementation of the deal by all parties. Preventing a nuclear armed Iran is a UK priority for both our security and that of the region.

DPRK

Ministers will focus on the threat the DPRK poses to global security and condemn its pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programmes in violation of multiple UN Security Council resolutions. We want the discussion to reinforce the importance of a strong and united EU response. The UK has led efforts to agree a new set of EU autonomous measures against the DPRK set to be adopted at the Foreign Affairs Council. We will make clear the importance of the EU and all its Members States supporting the full enforcement in third countries of the measures adopted under United Nations Security Council resolutions.

Turkey

Ministers will informally discuss development over lunch with a focus on the regional situation.

Human Rights

Ministers will discuss the EU’s approach to human rights challenges in bilateral and multilateral fora. We will stress that wider equities in EU and Member State relationships with third countries should not preclude holding those countries to account for failure to observe their human rights obligations and make clear that the UK will continue to work closely with the EU on human rights even after we leave. Council Conclusions will be adopted.

WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Sir Alan Duncan (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

Informal meeting of EU Foreign Ministers (Gymnich): 7-8 September 2017

My Right Honourable Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs attended the bi-annual informal meeting of EU foreign ministers (known as the Gymnich) on 7-8 September in Tallinn, Estonia. The Gymnich was hosted by Sven Mikser, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Estonia and was chaired by the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini. Discussion centred on Democratic People Republic of Korea (DPRK), Middle East Peace Policy (MEPP) and working methods.

Johannes Hahn (EU Commissioner for Neighbourhood Policy and Enlargement Negotiations) also attended. David McAllister (Chairman of the European Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee) was present for the working dinner and session on the second day. EU foreign ministers met Foreign Ministers of the candidate countries on the morning of 8 September.

The format of the Gymnich is designed to allow EU foreign ministers to engage in informal discussion on a number of issues. In contrast to the Foreign Affairs Council (the next of which will be held on 16 October), Ministers do not take formal decisions or agree Conclusions at the Gymnich.

Gymnich discussion

MEPP

Ministers agreed that a two-state solution was the only way forward but the humanitarian situation was severe. Ms. Mogherini explained that the European External Action Service (EEAS) and the EU Commission were reviewing EU financial assistance to look at what would be most effective in advancing the two state solution.

DPRK

Ms.Mogherini proposed three strands of EU action. First, economic pressure. The EU should support a new UNSCR and adopt new EU sanctions, including looking at EU investment and targeted measures. Second, diplomatic action and insistence on peaceful denuclearisation. Third, protecting the global non-proliferation regime. The EU should lobby countries that weren't fully implementing existing UN sanctions on DPRK and protect the JCPOA.

Countering violent extremism

Ministers welcomed the existing security and counter-terrorism co-operation between the European Union and the EU candidate countries and agreed that it should be further developed and intensified.

WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Sir Alan Duncan (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

Foreign Affairs Council – 17 July 2017

My Right Honourable Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs attended the Foreign Affairs Council on 17 July. The Foreign Affairs Council was chaired by the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini. The meeting was held in Brussels.

Foreign Affairs Council

The meeting covered discussions on the EU Global Strategy, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Libya and Migration.

EU Global Strategy

The Council had a discussion on the implementation on the EU Global Strategy; Foreign Ministers provided guidance on the priorities for 2017 – 2018.

DPRK

The discussion was shaped by the Council Conclusions, agreed in the EU Political and Security Committee earlier in the day. Ministers focused on the threat the DPRK posted to global security and condemned its pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles programme in violation multiple UN Security Council resolutions.

Libya

The Council adopted Conclusions on Libya. With the EU warmly welcoming the appointment of Ghassan Salame as the new Special Representative of the UN Secretary General. The Council also agreed to extend the CSDP mission EUBAM Libya until 31 December 2018. The Council underlined the importance of Operation Sophia (the EU’s naval operation to disrupt the business model of human smugglers and traffickers in the Southern Central Mediterranean).

Migration

Foreign Ministers discussed migration, focusing on the situation in the Central Mediterranean Route, together with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi, and the Director-General of the International Organisation for Migration William Lacy Swing.

Ministers agreed a number of measures without discussion:

- The Council adopted a crisis management concept for a new civilian CSDP mission in Iraq.
- On 17 July 2017, the Council added 16 persons to the list of those targeted by EU restrictive measures against the Syrian regime.
- The Council adopted Conclusions on Pakistan, stating that the EU has a clear interest in a stable, secure, and democratic Pakistan.
- The Council adopted Conclusions on addressing the risks of famine.
- The Council adopted Conclusions on the EU priorities at the UN and at the 72nd UN General Assembly.
- The Council endorsed the EU-ASEAN plan of action 2018 – 2022.

WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Sir Alan Duncan (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

Foreign Affairs Council – 15 May 2017

My Right Honourable Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs attended the Foreign Affairs Council on 15 May. The Foreign Affairs Council was chaired by the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini. The meeting was held in Brussels.

Foreign Affairs Council

Agenda items included Security and Defence, Horn of Africa, EU-Africa and the Eastern Partnership.

Security and Defence

The Security and Defence discussion centred on HRVP Mogherini and the European Commission updating Foreign Ministers on a variety of dossiers, including the Military Planning and Conduct Capability, Permanent Structured Cooperation, the Coordinated Annual Review of Defence, the forthcoming ATHENA review, CSDP and the European Defence Fund.

Horn of Africa

There was widespread agreement amongst Foreign Ministers that the Horn was of strategic importance for Europe. Mogherini and several others warmly thanked the UK for the London Conference which offered an opportunity to stabilise Somalia. Other areas highlighted for increased EU action were the border conflict between Ethiopia and Eritrea, the Nile basin tensions between Egypt and Ethiopia, and using the EU-strategic partnership with Ethiopia to deliver messages on human rights and political reform.

EU-Africa

Mogherini introduced the 4 May EEAS/Commission Joint Communication (JC) on the future direction of the EU-Africa relationship, including deliverables for the November Africa-EU Summit. There were two main themes: creating more resilient states and societies, and generating jobs - especially for young people. Member States welcomed the JC and its proposals to increase investment, jobs, and improve education. Foreign Ministers had lunch with African Union Chair Faki.

Eastern Partnership

Foreign Ministers looked forward to the Eastern Partnership Summit in November and discussed how best to build strong links with partners.

Ministers agreed a number of measures without discussion:
- The Council adopted Conclusions on Venezuela
- The Council adopted Conclusions on indigenous peoples
- The Council approved a concept of operations on regionalisation of CSDP action in the Sahel.
- The Council approved the staff rules of the EU Satellite Centre (SATCEN).
- The Council approved the High Representative Report on the Operation ALTHEA in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
- The Council adopted a decision mobilising €2.64 million under the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) to provide support to 964 dismissed workers made redundant in four Finnish enterprises operating in the manufacture of computer, electronic and optical products sector.

WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Sir Alan Duncan (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

Informal Meeting of EU Foreign Ministers (Gymnich): 28 April 2017

I attended the bi-annual informal meeting of EU Foreign Ministers (known as the Gymnich) on 28 April in Valletta, Malta. The Gymnich was hosted by Dr George Vella, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Malta and was chaired by the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini. Discussion centred on Turkey, Globalisation, the EU Global Strategy and the previous day’s violence in the Macedonia parliament.

Johannes Hahn (EU Commissioner for Neighbourhood Policy and Enlargement Negotiations) also attended. David McAllister (Chairman of the European Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee) was present for the opening session on Turkey. EU Foreign Ministers met with the Foreign Ministers of the candidate countries in the afternoon.

The format of the Gymnich is designed to allow EU Foreign Ministers to engage in informal discussion on a number of issues. In contrast to the Foreign Affairs Council (the next of which will be held on 19 June), Ministers do not take formal decisions or agree Conclusions at the Gymnich.

Gymnich discussion

Turkey

EU Foreign Ministers discussed Turkey in the opening session, agreeing on the need to maintain a dialogue with this strategic partner. I welcomed this consensus and stressed the importance of the tone of our engagement. In the afternoon, EU Foreign Ministers were joined by their Turkish counterpart (Cavusoglu) who touched on a number of matters of shared interest, including the result of the recent constitutional referendum.

Globalisation

Ms. Mogherini introduced a discussion on how to ensure the global trade agenda delivers demonstrable benefits for all EU citizens.

EU Global Strategy (EUGS)

Ms. Mogherini gave the assembled EU Foreign Ministers an account of the EU’s activity in the foreign and security policy sphere since the publication of the Global Strategy (EUGS) last June.

Violence in the FYROM Parliament

Several Member States condemned the violence in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia parliament on 27 April. The FYROM Foreign Minister (Poposki) said there could be no justification for the violence and that those responsible would be brought to justice.

WS
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Sir Alan Duncan (Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
Commons

Foreign Affairs Council – 3 April 2017

My Right Honourable Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs attended the Foreign Affairs Council on 3 April. The Foreign Affairs Council was chaired by the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, (HRVP), Federica Mogherini. The meeting was held in Brussels.

Foreign Affairs Council

Agenda items included Syria, Yemen and Libya. Aboul Gheit, Secretary General of the Arab League, debriefed on the Arab Summit in Amman over lunch at the invitation of the HRVP.

Syria

The Council discussed the situation in Syria and adopted Council Conclusions. The discussion reaffirmed the EU remained committed to a political solution to the crisis. Planning for post-conflict assistance needed to start, but there could be no reconstruction assistance until a credible political transition was firmly underway. The Council agreed to adopt the EU strategy on Syria.

Yemen

The Council discussed the situation in Yemen and adopted Council Conclusions. HRVP Mogherini discussed a potential EU role in Yemen to restart political talks. Foreign Ministers reaffirmed the seriousness of the situation in Yemen and discussed a new framework that had been presented to the warring parties.

Libya

Council members discussed the situation in Libya following the first meeting of the Libya Quartet on 18 March 2017. They discussed common ground between the parties and underlined the EU’s commitment to supporting Libyans in finding unity and stability within the framework of the Libyan Political Agreement.

Ministers agreed a number of measures without discussion:

- The Council adopted Conclusions on the promotion and protection of the rights of the child.
- The Council adopted Conclusions on Somalia
- The Council adopted a decision supporting the UN Programme of Actions to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Lights Weapons (SALW) in All Its Aspects.
- The Council extended its decision 2014/129/CFSP until 2 July 2017 in order to ensure the smooth continuation of the work of the EU non-proliferation consortium of think-tanks, based on the funds still available.
- The Council amended the restrictive measures in view of the situation in Yemen to transpose an update by the United Nations related to four persons subject to restrictive measures.
- The Council adopted a new EU policy on training for the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP).
- The Council approved the exercise specifications for the EU crisis management military exercise in 2017 (MILEX17).

WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Penny Mordaunt (Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work)
Commons

Disabled People’s Employment Corporation (GB) Ltd

The Disabled People’s Employment Corporation (GB) Ltd, one of DWP’s Arms’-Length Bodies, has entered Solvent Members’ Voluntary Liquidation. Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP are the liquidators and any residual asset value will be returned to the Department. The Company was previously Remploy Ltd and has been managing legacy issues following the exit of Remploy Employment Services from Government control in April 2015 as a partly employee-owned company.

Since 2015, the Board has been working towards a well-ordered closure, dealing with legacy assets and liabilities. The last premises were sold in September 2017, and the Company’s members agreed to put the Company into liquidation on 7 October 2017.

I plan to deposit the Company’s accounts for the period up to liquidation in the Library of the House in due course. But I can reassure the House that the Directors believe the Company has sufficient assets to settle its creditors in full, and there will be no redundancies as the Company has had no employees since 2015. The pensions of those who worked for the company are secure: the Remploy Ltd Pension and Assurance Scheme has been sponsored directly by my Department since 1 April 2016.

The liquidators are now responsible for the Company, and the Department will manage the contract with the liquidator, who will refer any significant decisions regarding the on-going management of the Department’s investment in the Company to the Principal Accounting Officer if necessary. Responsibilities during this liquidation period are explained in the Framework Document which will be deposited in the Library of the House today.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS165
WS
Department for International Development
Made on: 16 October 2017
Made by: Priti Patel (Secretary of State for International Development)
Commons

Economic Development in Africa and South Asia

Over the next decade, a billion more young people will enter the job market, mainly in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. There is a chronic need for jobs and better opportunities in these countries to prevent the next generation falling further into poverty, potentially fuelling global instability and insecurity.

As set out in DFID’s Economic Development Strategy, the UK Government wants to support developing countries to transition into vibrant economies and become stronger trading partners. No country can defeat poverty and leave aid dependency behind without sustainable economic growth, jobs, trade and investment.

CDC is central to the UK’s approach to promoting inclusive growth and economic development in Africa and South Asia. As the UK’s Development Finance Institution, wholly owned by the UK government, it is a world leader in its field. It provides much-needed capital, expertise and support to businesses in the poorest and most fragile countries, helping them to grow markets and create jobs which change the lives of individuals, families and whole communities.

CDC invests for development impact, introducing much-needed capital, expertise and support to thousands of businesses, creating millions of jobs, generating essential taxes, and strengthening transformational sectors such as infrastructure, manufacturing and agriculture. Over the last 3 years - from 2014 through to 2016 - companies backed by CDC in Africa and South Asia have created over 3 million new direct and indirect jobs, and paid taxes to national governments worth over $9 billion.

In agreement with my Rt. Hon Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Elizabeth Truss MP, I am pleased to set out the next step in the UK’s commitment to the growth of CDC, through a gradual capital increase over the next five years. This follows the passing of the CDC Act earlier this year which increased the limit of capital which the UK could invest in CDC.

New capital will enable CDC to build on these excellent development results to make hundreds more investments, create millions of new jobs, and make a lasting difference to the lives of people in the world’s poorest and most fragile countries, by helping individuals to find work, earn money, feed their families and send their children to school.

The decision to invest new capital in CDC comes at a critical time. There is a huge shortfall in the investment needed to meet the ambitions of the Global Goals agreed by the UN in 2015. The UK is rising to this challenge by using government-funded capital in innovative ways. By investing patiently, CDC demonstrates to private investors the opportunities that exist, even in the most difficult places. This leads the way for other investors to follow, mobilising capital from a much larger pool of private investors.

Over the last 5 years, since 2012, DFID has been working together with CDC in a thoughtful and phased way to grow CDC’s capabilities, better measure its impact and identify the need for the long-term, patient capital that CDC can invest to transform the economies of developing countries.

In February Parliament passed the CDC Act, which benefitted from constructive inputs and debate from MPs and Peers from across both Houses.

In July, CDC published its new 5 year strategy. This strategy maintains CDC’s focus on investing in the poorest and most fragile countries in Africa and South Asia and sets out innovative approaches to maximise the transformational impact of CDCs investments, while committing CDC to increased levels of transparency and reporting.

DFID will invest an average of up to £703 million per year over the next 5 years, to support CDC’s new strategy and scale-up its job-creating investment activities. These funds will be drawn down as needed by CDC in response to market demand. The new capital will support investments in Africa and South Asia in priority sectors – those creating the most jobs in the hardest to reach. Capital invested in CDC is invested and reinvested time and again, to ensure that every penny of taxpayers’ money is having maximum development impact. At the same time, CDC is leading the way globally with its code of responsible investing, raising the social, environmental and governance standards of investment in the world’s poorest countries.

This investment is the outcome of extensive analysis and a detailed business case – a copy of which is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/capital-increase-to-cdc-the-uks-development-finance-institution-to-deliver-increased-development-impact-in-africa-and-south-asia-2017-2022.

I am proud to set out this support today, which will have huge development impact for decades to come. CDC’s investments lay the foundations for sustainable and responsible businesses which create jobs, provide vital services, strengthen economies and ultimately transform the world’s poorest nations, and in doing so, build global security and prosperity that benefits us all.

WS
HM Treasury
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Elizabeth Truss (The Chief Secretary to the Treasury)
Commons

Spending Authority

It is important that departments can start spending to prepare for Brexit when they need to do so. Managing Public Money requires that expenditure on new services must rest on specific legislation. However, delaying spend until legislation has reached Royal Assent could jeopardise readiness for Brexit.

To address this, for the small proportion of spending affected, ministers can issue a technical direction, allowing critical spending to be incurred ahead of Royal Assent, whilst ensuring transparency to Parliament.

In these cases, the use of a Direction will be a matter of timing. Departments will still need to ensure spending is in all other respects regular, proper, feasible and good value for money, in the usual way. I have asked my officials to write to all departments explaining this process. They will also write to the Public Accounts Committee - this letter will be published to ensure full transparency.

As confirmed yesterday, by the Prime Minister to the House and by the Chancellor to the Treasury Committee, the Treasury has committed over £250 million of additional spending in 2017-18 to prepare for Brexit from the Reserve. Departmental allocations will be set out at Supplementary Estimates in the usual way. An update on Brexit spending will also be provided at the Autumn Budget.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS163
WS
HM Treasury
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Lord Bates (Lords Spokesperson)
Lords

Spending Authority

My right honourable friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury (Elizabeth Truss) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

It is important that departments can start spending to prepare for Brexit when they need to do so. Managing Public Money requires that expenditure on new services must rest on specific legislation. However, delaying spend until legislation has reached Royal Assent could jeopardise readiness for Brexit.

To address this, for the small proportion of spending affected, ministers can issue a technical direction, allowing critical spending to be incurred ahead of Royal Assent, whilst ensuring transparency to Parliament.

In these cases, the use of a Direction will be a matter of timing. Departments will still need to ensure spending is in all other respects regular, proper, feasible and good value for money, in the usual way. I have asked my officials to write to all departments explaining this process. They will also write to the Public Accounts Committee - this letter will be published to ensure full transparency.

As confirmed yesterday, by the Prime Minister to the House and by the Chancellor to the Treasury Committee, the Treasury has committed over £250 million of additional spending in 2017-18 to prepare for Brexit from the Reserve. Departmental allocations will be set out at Supplementary Estimates in the usual way. An update on Brexit spending will also be provided at the Autumn Budget.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS162
WS
Department of Health
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Lord O'Shaughnessy (Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health)
Lords

General Practice Indemnity: Development of a state backed scheme

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health has made the following written statement:

I am today updating the House on recent developments regarding indemnity arrangements for NHS general practice in England.

The Government is committed to ensuring that general practice is an attractive long-term career option that gives stimulus and stability to our brightest medical graduates. Therefore, today I have announced that the Department of Health is planning, subject to examination of relevant issues, the development of a state-backed indemnity scheme for general practice in England.

Rising cost of indemnity is a great source of concern for General Practitioners (GPs). Our ambition is to deliver a more stable and more affordable system for GPs and their patients. The scheme could provide financially sustainable cover for future, and potentially historic, claims arising from the delivery of NHS services.

The Department has benefitted from the engagement with the four Medical Defence Organisations (MDOs) and GP representatives over recent months. Any new scheme should meet the needs of current and future GPs, be in the interest of patients and represent value for money for taxpayers. Transfer of historic liabilities from MDOs to a new scheme would be dependent on satisfactory negotiation with the MDOs.

We will explore with GP representatives how to embed new indemnity arrangements, including the future costs, into GP contract negotiations. The Department will set up a stakeholder group and arrange a first roundtable next month with the Royal College of General Practitioners, British Medical Association and other GP representatives to gather views from General Practice and agree how best to engage with the sector going forward.

Any scheme would take at least 12-18 months to establish and require careful negotiation. GPs should continue to ensure they have appropriate indemnity cover in line with General Medical Council requirements to enable them to practise. NHS England has already committed to provide additional funding to GP practices to cover the estimated annual indemnity inflation for 2016/17 and 2017/18. NHS England has also announced additional money for indemnity cover over the coming winter.

Indemnity arrangements are a devolved matter and the Department will continue to liaise with the Devolved Administrations, who will make their own decisions about indemnity provision in their territories.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS159
WS
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Lord Prior of Brampton (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
Lords

EU Environment Council

My honourable friend the Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry (Claire Perry) has made the following written ministerial statement:

I will attend the EU Environment Council, which will take place on 13th October in Luxembourg.

Following adoption of the agenda, the list of “A” items will be approved.

Under legislative proposals, the Council will debate two proposals with the aim to get an agreement in the Council of Ministers:

  • A Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on binding annual greenhouse gas emission reductions by Member States from 2021 to 2030 for a resilient Energy Union and to meet commitments under the Paris Agreement and amending Regulation No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council on a mechanism for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions and other information relevant to climate change. This is known as the Effort Sharing Regulation (ESR).

  • A Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the inclusion of greenhouse gas emissions and removals from land use, land use change and forestry into the 2030 climate and energy framework and amending Regulation No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council on a mechanism for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions and other information relevant to climate change. This is known as the Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry Regulation (LULUCF).

Under non-legislative proposals, the Council will seek to adopt Conclusions on the EU priorities for the third meeting of the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA–3), and on the preparations for the 23rd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The following items will be discussed under Any Other Business:

1. Reports on recent international meetings:

  • Sixth session of the Meeting of the Parties (MOP 6) to the Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention),
  • Joint High-Level Segment under the Meetings of the Parties to the Aarhus Convention and its Protocol on PRTRs,
  • Third session of the Meeting of the Parties (MOPP 3) to the Protocol on Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers,
  • First meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Minamata Convention on Mercury (COP 1), (Geneva, 24–29 September 2017)
  • 13th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD COP 13)

2. A more transparent, more effective and safer assessment of chemical substances

3. Importance, for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, of good coordination and coherence between the integrated national energy and climate plans for 2030 and the long-term emissions reduction strategies, as well as of minimum quality, comparability and transparency standards

4. 50th session of the international seminar "Science for Peace the World Over" (Erice, Italy, 20–23 August 2017)

The UK has also secured an additional AOB to encourage those Member States who are ready to proceed with early ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the UN Montreal Protocol to protect the Earth’s ozone layer to do so in time for the 30th anniversary meeting of the parties to the Protocol, in Montreal this November.

Last October, agreement was reached in Kigali to amend the Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) globally by around 85% by the mid-2040s. This could avoid up to 0.5 degrees Celsius of global warming by the end of the century, making a major contribution to the Paris climate goal of a 2 degree limit. The amendment will come into force in 2019 as long as at least 20 countries have ratified by then.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS161
WS
Department for Transport
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Lord Callanan (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Transport)
Lords

Rail Infrastructure Funding:2019 - 2024

My Right Honourable friend, the Secretary of State for Transport (Chris Grayling), has made the following Ministerial Statement.

I am today publishing my final Statement of Funds Available for the railway in England and Wales for Control Period 6, which covers the years 2019 to 2024. This follows my publication of a High Level Output Specification and initial Statement of Funds Available on 20 July.

The High Level Output Specification made clear that the Government is determined that the railway becomes more focused on issues that matter most to passengers – such as punctuality and reliability. It therefore focused on the operation, maintenance and renewal of the railway – areas which are crucial to delivering a more reliable railway. At the time of its publication, the Government deferred publication of a final Statement of Funds Available, following more work to establish Network Rail’s costs and the scope for efficiency savings across Control Period 6.

This work has now concluded. On the basis of further work by Network Rail, of continued scrutiny by the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) – including through its independent reporter, Nichols – and through work by my Department and HM Treasury to challenge costings, Government is now in a position to set out its funding envelope for Control Period 6.

At this stage we expect around £47.9bn to be spent on the railway across Control Period 6. Of this, we expect up to £34.7bn to be provided directly via Government grant, with the remainder coming from a combination of track access charges and income from other sources, such as Network Rail’s property portfolio. These amounts will be refined during the regulatory process, which will produce by summer 2018 detailed draft amounts for the 2019-2024 period for consultation. Budgets will be set at route level, as part of the devolution of more accountability and authority to Network Rail routes, driving change in the organisation. The regulatory process will conclude with a Final Determination in October 2018.

During this process I expect the regulator to provide a strong efficiency challenge to maximise value for money, and the ORR has substantially changed its regulatory approach to help achieve this.

We have some of the most intensively used railways in Europe, and this investment focuses on the essential work needed to ensure their safety and reliability, including funding to support a significant increase in renewals activity compared to the current period, and increased maintenance spend to allow Network Rail to meet the challenges of a busier network. This investment recognises the critical importance of these activities in preserving the day to day operation of the railway.

I believe that a renewed focus on core railway activities will help return train performance to the levels that passengers expect and deserve. Overall, this significant funding demonstrates Government’s continued commitment to investing in the railway for the benefit of passengers, communities, the supply chain and the wider economy.

Government has already made clear that it expects new enhancements to the rail network to be developed outside of the regulatory system. However, the Statement of Funds Available published today includes funding to continue to take forward the enhancements that were deferred from Control Period 5. In line with the new process for enhancements these schemes will continue to be subject to ongoing consideration to ensure they deliver the best results for both rail users and taxpayers. In addition to this, I am making funding available for the early-stage development of new enhancement schemes. I will announce further details on a new process for taking forward enhancements later in the year. We need to ensure investment best addresses the needs of passengers and freight, and that funding commitments appropriately reflect the stage of development of those enhancements.

Furthermore, the Statement of Funds Available also includes funding for continued investment in improvements to both the accessibility of the railway and the rail freight network. Our commitment to funding accessibility improvements in the railway further emphasises our drive to ensure that the railway is accessible to all. The Government has recognised the crucial role that rail freight plays in supporting the economy and the environment and our continued investment in the freight network recognises this.

Given the need to spend public money wisely and to incentivise the industry to do so, I believe the funding envelope published today is stretching yet achievable. I will continue to push Network Rail to improve its effectiveness and efficiency. In particular I support an ambitious approach to route devolution, so that Network Rail is more focused on its customers. I will also modernise the Government’s oversight and assurance arrangements for Network Rail to properly reflect its public sector status. I have taken steps to ensure that this money is spent more effectively and that the problems with cost and delivery which occurred during Control Period 5 are not repeated. I will also continue to drive improvement across the wider industry, including the franchising system. I will update this House further on my plans for wider rail strategy in the near future. I am arranging for copies of the Statement of Funds Available to be placed in the libraries of the House.

Statement of Funds Available (PDF Document, 1.34 MB)
This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS160
WS
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Lord Prior of Brampton (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
Lords

The Clean Growth Strategy

My honourable friend the Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry (Claire Perry) has made the following written ministerial statement:

The Government is today publishing the Clean Growth Strategy – an ambitious strategy to cut emissions while keeping costs down for consumers, creating good jobs and growing the economy. This is an important component of our modern Industrial Strategy. We are also laying our responses to the Committee on Climate Change’s 2017 Progress Report to Parliament and publishing a suite of related documents.

Clean growth can make a real difference to people’s lives, from reducing energy bills and improving air quality, to supporting new technologies and boosting earning power in high-quality jobs.

We start from a position of strength. We have already made significant progress towards our legally binding 2050 target to reduce emissions by at least 80 per cent against 1990 levels. We exceeded the target emissions reductions of our first carbon budget (2008 to 2012) by one per cent of the budget level and we project that we will outperform against our second and third budgets covering the years 2013 to 2022 by almost five per cent and four per cent respectively.

The UK is a world leader in cutting emissions while growing the economy. Provisional statistics indicate that UK emissions in 2016 were 42 per cent lower than in 1990 and 6 per cent below those in 2015. At the same time, the UK’s GDP has increased by 67 per cent since 1990 showing that a strong, growing economy can go hand in hand with reduced emissions. On a per person basis, this means that we have reduced emissions faster than any other G7 nation and led the G7 group in growth in national income over the period.

The global transition to a low carbon economy offers huge growth opportunities which the UK is well placed to take advantage of as a core element of our Industrial Strategy. Our low carbon sector already employs over 230,000 people directly and another 200,000 through supply chains. Analysis for the Committee on Climate Change estimated that the low carbon economy has the potential to grow 11 per cent per year between 2015 and 2030 - four times faster than the rest of the economy.

While we have performed strongly to date, the task ahead is significant. The Clean Growth Strategy sets out policies and proposals across the whole of the economy and the country including business, housing, transport, power, the natural environment and the public sector.

Low carbon innovation is at the heart of our approach, with over £2.5 billion of government investment from 2015 to 2021. This forms part of the largest increase in public spending on UK science, research and innovation in almost 40 years.

The Clean Growth Strategy is an important milestone in the UK’s work to cut emissions and grow the economy. But it is not the end of the process. Clean technology is developing at a rapid pace and costs are falling faster than many predicted – for example, the cost of offshore wind has halved in two years. We look forward to working with colleagues across both Houses and the Devolved Administrations, and with people and organisations across the country, to ensure the UK can continue to lead the world in clean growth.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS158
WS
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Claire Perry (Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry)
Commons

EU Environment Council

I will attend the EU Environment Council, which will take place on 13th October in Luxembourg.

Following adoption of the agenda, the list of “A” items will be approved.

Under legislative proposals, the Council will debate two proposals with the aim to get an agreement in the Council of Ministers:

  • A Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on binding annual greenhouse gas emission reductions by Member States from 2021 to 2030 for a resilient Energy Union and to meet commitments under the Paris Agreement and amending Regulation No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council on a mechanism for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions and other information relevant to climate change. This is known as the Effort Sharing Regulation (ESR).

  • A Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the inclusion of greenhouse gas emissions and removals from land use, land use change and forestry into the 2030 climate and energy framework and amending Regulation No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council on a mechanism for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions and other information relevant to climate change. This is known as the Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry Regulation (LULUCF).

Under non-legislative proposals, the Council will seek to adopt Conclusions on the EU priorities for the third meeting of the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA–3), and on the preparations for the 23rd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The following items will be discussed under Any Other Business:

1.Reports on recent international meetings:

  • Sixth session of the Meeting of the Parties (MOP 6) to the Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention),
  • Joint High-Level Segment under the Meetings of the Parties to the Aarhus Convention and its Protocol on PRTRs,
  • Third session of the Meeting of the Parties (MOPP 3) to the Protocol on Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers,
  • First meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Minamata Convention on Mercury (COP 1), (Geneva, 24–29 September 2017)
  • 13th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD COP 13)

2. A more transparent, more effective and safer assessment of chemical substances

3. Importance, for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, of good coordination and coherence between the integrated national energy and climate plans for 2030 and the long-term emissions reduction strategies, as well as of minimum quality, comparability and transparency standards

4. 50th session of the international seminar "Science for Peace the World Over" (Erice, Italy, 20–23 August 2017)

The UK has also secured an additional AOB to encourage those Member States who are ready to proceed with early ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the UN Montreal Protocol to protect the Earth’s ozone layer to do so in time for the 30th anniversary meeting of the parties to the Protocol, in Montreal this November.

Last October, agreement was reached in Kigali to amend the Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) globally by around 85% by the mid-2040s. This could avoid up to 0.5 degrees Celsius of global warming by the end of the century, making a major contribution to the Paris climate goal of a 2 degree limit. The amendment will come into force in 2019 as long as at least 20 countries have ratified by then.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS161
WS
Department for Transport
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Chris Grayling (Secretary of State for Transport)
Commons

Rail Infrastructure Funding:2019 - 2024

I am today publishing my final Statement of Funds Available for the railway in England and Wales for Control Period 6, which covers the years 2019 to 2024. This follows my publication of a High Level Output Specification and initial Statement of Funds Available on 20 July.

The High Level Output Specification made clear that the Government is determined that the railway becomes more focused on issues that matter most to passengers – such as punctuality and reliability. It therefore focused on the operation, maintenance and renewal of the railway – areas which are crucial to delivering a more reliable railway. At the time of its publication, the Government deferred publication of a final Statement of Funds Available, following more work to establish Network Rail’s costs and the scope for efficiency savings across Control Period 6.

This work has now concluded. On the basis of further work by Network Rail, of continued scrutiny by the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) – including through its independent reporter, Nichols – and through work by my Department and HM Treasury to challenge costings, Government is now in a position to set out its funding envelope for Control Period 6.

At this stage we expect around £47.9bn to be spent on the railway across Control Period 6. Of this, we expect up to £34.7bn to be provided directly via Government grant, with the remainder coming from a combination of track access charges and income from other sources, such as Network Rail’s property portfolio. These amounts will be refined during the regulatory process, which will produce by summer 2018 detailed draft amounts for the 2019-2024 period for consultation. Budgets will be set at route level, as part of the devolution of more accountability and authority to Network Rail routes, driving change in the organisation. The regulatory process will conclude with a Final Determination in October 2018.

During this process I expect the regulator to provide a strong efficiency challenge to maximise value for money, and the ORR has substantially changed its regulatory approach to help achieve this.

We have some of the most intensively used railways in Europe, and this investment focuses on the essential work needed to ensure their safety and reliability, including funding to support a significant increase in renewals activity compared to the current period, and increased maintenance spend to allow Network Rail to meet the challenges of a busier network. This investment recognises the critical importance of these activities in preserving the day to day operation of the railway.

I believe that a renewed focus on core railway activities will help return train performance to the levels that passengers expect and deserve. Overall, this significant funding demonstrates Government’s continued commitment to investing in the railway for the benefit of passengers, communities, the supply chain and the wider economy.

Government has already made clear that it expects new enhancements to the rail network to be developed outside of the regulatory system. However, the Statement of Funds Available published today includes funding to continue to take forward the enhancements that were deferred from Control Period 5. In line with the new process for enhancements these schemes will continue to be subject to ongoing consideration to ensure they deliver the best results for both rail users and taxpayers. In addition to this, I am making funding available for the early-stage development of new enhancement schemes. I will announce further details on a new process for taking forward enhancements later in the year. We need to ensure investment best addresses the needs of passengers and freight, and that funding commitments appropriately reflect the stage of development of those enhancements.

Furthermore, the Statement of Funds Available also includes funding for continued investment in improvements to both the accessibility of the railway and the rail freight network. Our commitment to funding accessibility improvements in the railway further emphasises our drive to ensure that the railway is accessible to all. The Government has recognised the crucial role that rail freight plays in supporting the economy and the environment and our continued investment in the freight network recognises this.

Given the need to spend public money wisely and to incentivise the industry to do so, I believe the funding envelope published today is stretching yet achievable. I will continue to push Network Rail to improve its effectiveness and efficiency. In particular I support an ambitious approach to route devolution, so that Network Rail is more focused on its customers. I will also modernise the Government’s oversight and assurance arrangements for Network Rail to properly reflect its public sector status. I have taken steps to ensure that this money is spent more effectively and that the problems with cost and delivery which occurred during Control Period 5 are not repeated. I will also continue to drive improvement across the wider industry, including the franchising system. I will update this House further on my plans for wider rail strategy in the near future. I am arranging for copies of the Statement of Funds Available to be placed in the libraries of the House.

Statement of Funds Available (PDF Document, 1.34 MB)
This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS160
WS
Department of Health
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Mr Jeremy Hunt (Secretary of State for Health)
Commons

General Practice Indemnity: Development of a state backed scheme

I am today updating the House on recent developments regarding indemnity arrangements for NHS general practice in England.

The Government is committed to ensuring that general practice is an attractive long-term career option that gives stimulus and stability to our brightest medical graduates. Therefore, today I have announced that the Department of Health is planning, subject to examination of relevant issues, the development of a state-backed indemnity scheme for general practice in England.

Rising cost of indemnity is a great source of concern for General Practitioners (GPs). Our ambition is to deliver a more stable and more affordable system for GPs and their patients. The scheme could provide financially sustainable cover for future, and potentially historic, claims arising from the delivery of NHS services.

The Department has benefitted from the engagement with the four Medical Defence Organisations (MDOs) and GP representatives over recent months. Any new scheme should meet the needs of current and future GPs, be in the interest of patients and represent value for money for taxpayers. Transfer of historic liabilities from MDOs to a new scheme would be dependent on satisfactory negotiation with the MDOs.

We will explore with GP representatives how to embed new indemnity arrangements, including the future costs, into GP contract negotiations. The Department will set up a stakeholder group and arrange a first roundtable next month with the Royal College of General Practitioners, British Medical Association and other GP representatives to gather views from General Practice and agree how best to engage with the sector going forward.

Any scheme would take at least 12-18 months to establish and require careful negotiation. GPs should continue to ensure they have appropriate indemnity cover in line with General Medical Council requirements to enable them to practise. NHS England has already committed to provide additional funding to GP practices to cover the estimated annual indemnity inflation for 2016/17 and 2017/18. NHS England has also announced additional money for indemnity cover over the coming winter.

Indemnity arrangements are a devolved matter and the Department will continue to liaise with the Devolved Administrations, who will make their own decisions about indemnity provision in their territories.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS162
WS
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Made on: 12 October 2017
Made by: Claire Perry (Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry)
Commons

The Clean Growth Strategy

The Government is today publishing the Clean Growth Strategy – an ambitious strategy to cut emissions while keeping costs down for consumers, creating good jobs and growing the economy. This is an important component of our modern Industrial Strategy. We are also laying our responses to the Committee on Climate Change’s 2017 Progress Report to Parliament and publishing a suite of related documents.

Clean growth can make a real difference to people’s lives, from reducing energy bills and improving air quality, to supporting new technologies and boosting earning power in high-quality jobs.

We start from a position of strength. We have already made significant progress towards our legally binding 2050 target to reduce emissions by at least 80 per cent against 1990 levels. We exceeded the target emissions reductions of our first carbon budget (2008 to 2012) by one per cent of the budget level and we project that we will outperform against our second and third budgets covering the years 2013 to 2022 by almost five per cent and four per cent respectively.

The UK is a world leader in cutting emissions while growing the economy. Provisional statistics indicate that UK emissions in 2016 were 42 per cent lower than in 1990 and 6 per cent below those in 2015. At the same time, the UK’s GDP has increased by 67 per cent since 1990 showing that a strong, growing economy can go hand in hand with reduced emissions. On a per person basis, this means that we have reduced emissions faster than any other G7 nation and led the G7 group in growth in national income over the period.

The global transition to a low carbon economy offers huge growth opportunities which the UK is well placed to take advantage of as a core element of our Industrial Strategy. Our low carbon sector already employs over 230,000 people directly and another 200,000 through supply chains. Analysis for the Committee on Climate Change estimated that the low carbon economy has the potential to grow 11 per cent per year between 2015 and 2030 - four times faster than the rest of the economy.

While we have performed strongly to date, the task ahead is significant. The Clean Growth Strategy sets out policies and proposals across the whole of the economy and the country including business, housing, transport, power, the natural environment and the public sector.

Low carbon innovation is at the heart of our approach, with over £2.5 billion of government investment from 2015 to 2021. This forms part of the largest increase in public spending on UK science, research and innovation in almost 40 years.

The Clean Growth Strategy is an important milestone in the UK’s work to cut emissions and grow the economy. But it is not the end of the process. Clean technology is developing at a rapid pace and costs are falling faster than many predicted – for example, the cost of offshore wind has halved in two years. We look forward to working with colleagues across both Houses and the Devolved Administrations, and with people and organisations across the country, to ensure the UK can continue to lead the world in clean growth.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS159
WS
Home Office
Made on: 11 October 2017
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Grenfell Tower Fire

My rt hon Friend the Minister of State for Immigration (Brandon Lewis) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I wish to inform the House that I am today introducing a change to the dedicated immigration policy for residents of Grenfell Tower and Grenfell Walk.

The Government has been clear that its priority is to ensure that survivors of this tragedy get the access they need to vital services, irrespective of immigration status.

On 5 July, we announced that those individuals directly affected by the Grenfell Tower fire who contact the Home Office via a specified process will be given a period of limited leave for 12 months to remain in the UK with full access to relevant support and assistance.

Our initial response to this terrible tragedy was rightly focused on survivors’ immediate needs in the aftermath of the fire and ensuring they could access the services they need to start to rebuild their lives.

However, since the Grenfell Tower immigration policy was announced, we have been planning for the future of those residents affected by these unprecedented events and listening to their feedback, as well as the views of Sir Martin Moore-Bick.

The Government believes it is right to provide the specific group of survivors who are eligible for limited leave to remain under the dedicated immigration policy greater certainty over their long-term future in the UK, subject to their continued eligibility and the necessary security and criminality and fraud checks being met.

That is why I am announcing today that those who qualify for leave to remain under the Grenfell immigration policy for survivors will now be provided with a route to permanent settlement in the UK.

Eligible individuals, who have already come forward or do so by 30 November 2017, will be granted an initial 12 months’ limited leave which will be extendable and lead to permanent residence after a total period of five years’ leave granted under the policy, subject to meeting security, criminality and fraud checks.

I also wish to inform the House of additional support for relatives of survivors or relatives of victims of the tragedy who have already been granted entry to the UK for reasons relating to the Grenfell tragedy. The changes I am announcing today will enable relatives to stay in the UK for up to six months from their date of entry. This new dedicated immigration policy allows relatives who have come to the UK and who were initially granted less than 6 months’ leave in order to provide a short period of support a survivor or to arrange the funeral of a family member to extend their stay to 6 months in total.

Anyone who believes they are eligible for either scheme can speak face-to-face to a specialist Home Office team at The Community Assistance Centre, 10 Bard Road, Nottingdale, West London, W10 6TP.

There are existing immigration policies which allow us to consider compassionate circumstances where someone is not covered by the bespoke policies for survivors and relatives and any such applications would be considered on a case by case basis.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS157
Expand all statements
Print selected
Showing 21-40 out of 353
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100