Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Ambulance Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many ambulances in operation across England are more than (a) two, (b) five and (c) 10 years old.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

Grouped Questions: 107047 | 107074
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Ambulance Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many ambulances were in operation across England in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

Grouped Questions: 107047 | 107073
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he expects the NHS high-risk maintenance backlog to be remedied.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department collects data on backlog maintenance (the estimated costs of eradicating all backlog maintenance to bring the estate and facilities to an appropriate standard for quality and safety) annually from National Health Service trusts through its Estates Returns Information Collection. This data is submitted by NHS providers who are responsible for assessing their own backlog maintenance and then assuring the quality of their own returns. It can be found at:

http://digital.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB30096

Local NHS organisations are responsible for managing their own estate and ensuring they provide an environment that facilitates the delivery of high quality, safe care. This includes planning and investment to tackle high risk maintenance requirements. NHS providers receive funding through the NHS national tariff payment system and from other sources which enables them to undertake capital investment in their estate and in 2016-17 NHS providers made capital investment of around £1.6 billion in their land and buildings and as well as over £800 million for plants and machinery such as generators.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Cancer: Palliative Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to improve the management of pain, including the use of fentanyl, for cancer patients.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

NHS England is committed to transforming cancer services across the country and ensuring every patient has access to the care and treatment they need. The management of pain through drugs such as fentanyl is a clinical decision and should be considered on an individual basis, in line with patients’ clinical needs and in line with guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Foreign Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish the economic impact assessment of introducing charges to non-UK citizens for using NHS services.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

All National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts in England already have a statutory responsibility to make and recover charges from patients who are not ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom and are chargeable for their healthcare.

Following a detailed public consultation that ran from December 2015 to March 2016, the Government set out in its response to that consultation in February 2017 that it intended to amend the existing Charging Regulations, alongside a published impact assessment. Over the course of the consultation and decision-making process the Government carefully considered the impact the changes may have on public health, health inequalities and on vulnerable groups, which included children and individuals in receipt of maternity services. The Secretary of State has a continuing duty to consider the impact of policies on equality issues and so this will remain under review.

The amendment regulations maintain the existing exemptions in place for the purposes of protecting the public’s health and do not change our position of ensuring that the most vulnerable have access to free healthcare. This includes children looked after by a local authority.

The requirement for upfront charging will not apply in the case of treatment that clinicians consider immediately necessary, or otherwise urgent (such that it cannot wait until the overseas visitor can reasonably be expected to return home). This means that chargeable overseas visitors will never have immediately necessary treatment, or urgent treatment withheld or delayed pending payment. All maternity services continue to be considered urgent or immediately necessary and so will never be denied.

Grouped Questions: 107071 | 107072
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Police Custody: Mental Illness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish data on the number of people with a mental disorder removed to police stations under Section 135 or 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 for the period between 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Home Office has collected information on the number of persons detained under section 135 and 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 since April 2015.

Data on detentions under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983, covering the 2016/17 time period, and including the number of people who were detained in a police station, will be published in the next edition of the ‘Police powers and procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. This bulletin is scheduled for release on Thursday 26th October, and will be available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

Data on the number of detentions under section 135 of the Mental Health Act 1983 will be published as ‘experimental statistics’ in the same bulletin, to acknowledge that further development work is needed on these data.

Q
(Knowsley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Police: Bureaucracy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the time and resources required to apply her Department's new annual data requirement on recording each incident and each use of force; if she will publish the impact assessment made on that requirement; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The police-led Use of Force Data Review recommended that police forces record and publish a range of data each time force is used, including the reason force was used, injury data, the gender, ethnicity and age of the subject involved, and the location and outcome of the incident.

These recommendations were welcomed by the former Home Secretary, and the former Minister for Policing and the Fire Service made a Written Ministerial Statement on 2 March 2017 announcing the implementation of the recommendations, with police forces expected to commence recording by 1 April this year.

Police forces are committed to publishing their recorded data locally, and it is a subset of this data that will be provided to the Home Office under the annual data requirement, causing no additional burden to compliant forces. This system also consolidates bureaucratic, previous forms of data collection, such as the monitoring of conducted energy device use.

Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what changes have been made to the timetable for the roll-out of the Emergency Service network since it was agreed to; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. ESN will be a more capable, more flexible and more affordable communications network than the existing Airwave mobile radio system used by the three emergency services in England, Scotland and Wales. While still delivering mission critical voice communication, it will also provide broadband data services.

The timelines for ESN are ambitious and this is because we want to give the emergency services the benefits of the latest technology as soon as practicable. However the Government is clear that public safety is our priority and the emergency services will only transition when they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

A formal arrangement has been agreed between the Programme’s sponsors (including the Home Office) of the police, fire and rescue, ambulance services of Great Britain, for how any Airwave extension costs beyond the planned National Shutdown Date (31 December 2019) should be shared between themselves.

We are working closely with our key stakeholders and suppliers on a revised plan for delivering ESN. We will have greater clarity on timescales at the end of the year.

Grouped Questions: 106830
Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions have taken place between key stakeholders in and suppliers for the roll-out of the Emergency Service Network on changes to the timetable for the implementation of that roll-out; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. ESN will be a more capable, more flexible and more affordable communications network than the existing Airwave mobile radio system used by the three emergency services in England, Scotland and Wales. While still delivering mission critical voice communication, it will also provide broadband data services.

The timelines for ESN are ambitious and this is because we want to give the emergency services the benefits of the latest technology as soon as practicable. However the Government is clear that public safety is our priority and the emergency services will only transition when they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

A formal arrangement has been agreed between the Programme’s sponsors (including the Home Office) of the police, fire and rescue, ambulance services of Great Britain, for how any Airwave extension costs beyond the planned National Shutdown Date (31 December 2019) should be shared between themselves.

We are working closely with our key stakeholders and suppliers on a revised plan for delivering ESN. We will have greater clarity on timescales at the end of the year.

Grouped Questions: 106829
Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Human Trafficking: Nationality
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people convicted of human trafficking offences were (a) UK nationals, (b) other EU nationals and (c) nationals from outside the EU in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Data relating to the number of people prosecuted and convicted for modern slavery and human trafficking offences in England and Wales can be found in the “criminal justice system outcomes by offence” data tool table contained in the annual Criminal Justice Statistics publication, linked below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2016

It is not possible to disaggregate this data by the nationality of defendants as this information is not held centrally.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how far away from residential properties are the planned new prisons at (a) Yorkshire, adjacent to HM Prison Full Sutton, (b) HM Young Offenders Institute Rochester and (c) HM Young Offenders Institute Hindley.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Prison Site

Distance (m) from centre of prison1

Rochester

330

Hindley

166

Full Sutton2

531

1 Distance from estimated centre of prison.

2 Distance taken from centre of identified agricultural field.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Wales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with Natural Resources Wales on plans to build a prison on land in the Baglan Industrial Estate.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Ministry of Justice has had a number of discussions with relevant stakeholders relating to the development of the Baglan site in Port Talbot. Specifically, consultants, on behalf of the department, have been in contact with Natural Resource Wales to confirm the re-classification of the Baglan site from a C2 to a C1 classified site.

(A C2 classified zone is described as areas of the floodplain without significant flood defence infrastructure. A C1 classified zone is described as areas of the floodplain which are developed and served by significant infrastructure, including flood defences.)

Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Anti-slavery Task Force
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings of the anti-slavery task force there have been since that task force was established; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Data on the number of correspondence to the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI), which was responded to within 20 days is published quarterly as part of UKVI transparency data.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-august-2017

UKVI does not publish data in the 10 day and 30 day format requested.

Q
Asked by Frank Field
(Birkenhead)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's estimate is of the amount of EU legislation and regulation that can be incorporated into UK law without amendment.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill will convert European Union law into UK law as it applies in the UK at the moment of exit. This will ensure that, wherever possible, the same rules and laws will apply the day after exit as they did before.

The Government is still making a detailed assessment of what corrections will be required to make that law function appropriately on exit day. The Department for Exiting the European Union are working closely with departments across Government to ensure we make the changes required to deliver a functioning statute book on exit in the most efficient manner possible.

Q
Asked by Andrew Selous
(South West Bedfordshire)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Government Car Service: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has given guidance to drivers in the Government Car Services on Westminster City Councils' initiative Don't Be Idle.
A
Answered by: Mr John Hayes
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Government Car Service drivers are given a clear instruction not to keep engines running whilst parked or stationary and regular reminders are sent out on this subject. This instruction would also cover the aims of Westminster City Councils’ initiative on cars idling, which the drivers have been made aware of.

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Railways: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which new rail schemes to be jointly funded between Network Rail and the private sector his Department has assessed and analysed in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We continue to explore all opportunities for private sector funding, including in rail schemes such as East West Rail and Crossrail 2.

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Railways: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many new projects or schemes Network Rail has agreed to in the last 12 months which are to be jointly funded with the private sector; and which those projects or schemes are.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We continue to explore all opportunities for private sector funding, including in rail schemes such as East West Rail and Crossrail 2.

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Railways
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when his Department plans to publish the report it commissioned from First Class Partnerships on the commissioning of new rail services; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department is not aware of any report commissioned from First Class Partnerships on this issue.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he has any plans to review the personal independence payments assessment criteria.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There are no current plans to review the Personal Independence Payment assessment criteria.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Appeals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing an assessment rate for personal independence payments during the appeals process.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

No assessment or costings exercise has been made in relation to introducing an assessment rate for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) during the appeal process. As for other decisions in law, a PIP decision persists until such time as an appeal against the decision is concluded. As PIP can be paid at one of eight different rates this means that those appealing against a successful award continue to be paid the level of PIP awarded by the Secretary of State during the appeal process.

Grouped Questions: 107038
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