Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department of Health
Nurses: Training
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) the Royal College of Nursing, (2) the Royal College of Midwives, and (3) UNISON, as a consequence of the fall since 2016 reported by UCAS in the number of applications to universities to study for nursing degrees.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

Ministers routinely meet nursing leaders and discuss a range of issues, including recruitment and retention of nurses and midwives.

The Government remains committed to reforming nursing, midwifery and allied health pre-registration education and increasing the number of places available for students so that two in three nursing applicants are no longer turned down for a place; at the same time ensuring these students have more money available to them while they study.

Health Education England is confident that the National Health Service will have the required number of students it needs starting courses this year and will continue to work with the education sector to deliver these reforms successfully for the longer term.

Grouped Questions: HL1090
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department of Health
Nurses: Training
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made to date in implementing their plan to provide 10,000 additional nursing student places by 2020; and how much additional funding has been provided to universities as part of this plan.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

Ministers routinely meet nursing leaders and discuss a range of issues, including recruitment and retention of nurses and midwives.

The Government remains committed to reforming nursing, midwifery and allied health pre-registration education and increasing the number of places available for students so that two in three nursing applicants are no longer turned down for a place; at the same time ensuring these students have more money available to them while they study.

Health Education England is confident that the National Health Service will have the required number of students it needs starting courses this year and will continue to work with the education sector to deliver these reforms successfully for the longer term.

Grouped Questions: HL1089
Q
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department of Health
Radioisotopes: Imports
Lords
Her Majesty's Government (1) what assessment they have made of the potential impact of not reaching agreement with the EU by April 2019 on the supply of the radioisotope molybdenum-99 used to produce technetium-99m which is required for over 80 per cent of diagnostic medicine procedures in the UK; (2) what assessment they have made of the potential impact of delays or disruption to the supply of diagnostic medicine procedures that may result; and (3) what contingency plans they have put in place to mitigate such delays or disruption to that supply after Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The Government is fully aware of the importance of molybdenum-99 and the reliance on this medical radioisotope for diagnostic procedures in the National Health Service. The United Kingdom’s ability to import medical isotopes from Europe and the rest of the world will not be affected by withdrawal from Euratom. It is in everyone’s interest to not disrupt the timely access of treatment to patients and to ensure that cross-border trade with the European Union and Euratom is as frictionless as possible.

Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Public Libraries
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to promote the use of libraries, including libraries' online and digital content, with new library users.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The Libraries Taskforce, jointly established by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Local Government Association, published Libraries Deliver: Ambition for Public Libraries in England 2016-2021 in December 2016. This strategy sets out 7 strategic Outcomes that libraries support, one of which is increasing digital access and literacy, and it highlights a range of initiatives through which libraries support digital skills, access, skills and related work. The UK Digital Strategy also underlined the importance of libraries as a ‘go to provider’ for digital skills training.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Children: Social Services
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they monitor the performance of Ofsted in relation to that agency's responses to family members who raise concerns relating to (1) children's services, and (2) children's homes; and what steps, if any, they are taking to improve that performance.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 31 July 2017

Ofsted is a Non-Ministerial Government Department and is not an executive agency of the Department for Education (DfE). The responsibility for performance rests with Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, with oversight undertaken by the Ofsted Board. Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector also reports to the Education Select Committee on matters relating to Ofsted’s performance.

Officials from DfE’s and Ofsted’s social care teams engage with one another frequently so that any policy or operational issues, including how concerns raised by families are dealt with, can be addressed. Where appropriate DfE raises issues of concern with Ofsted and refers members of the public to Ofsted’s complaints procedure.

The details of how Ofsted addresses improvement in performance on these matters will be placed in the libraries of the House.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Ofsted
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish the methodology by which the performance of the Chair of Ofsted is monitored.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The expectations around performance monitoring of public appointment holders are set out in the Governance Code on Public Appointments published by the Cabinet Office. This is found in paragraph 3.5 of the current code.

These expectations are reflected in the terms on which the Chair is appointed by the Secretary of State. As part of this process, the Chair is required to participate in a performance appraisal with the Permanent Secretary.

Also under these terms, the Chair will share a copy of his own objectives, and have a discussion to review progress at least annually with the Permanent Secretary. This arrangement reflects Ofsted’s independence from the Department of Education. The current Chair has shared his objectives with the Board, and Board members have agreed to establish a framework for reviewing his effectiveness.

Additionally, the Chair is also expected to adhere to the highest personal and professional standards, in accordance with the Nolan principles published by the Committee on Standards in Public Life, and to comply with the Board Code of Conduct as set out in the Ofsted corporate governance framework. Ofsted is currently reviewing its corporate governance arrangements.

The Cabinet Office Governance Code can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/governance-code-for-public-appointments.

The Ofsted corporate governance framework can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ofsteds-corporate-governance-framework.

Q
Asked by Lord Boateng
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Secure Psychiatric Units: Ethnic Groups
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, what data are collected regarding the number of BME patients in locked wards in England; and what plans they have to impose new requirements for the collection of such data.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

Data on the number of BME patients being treated in locked rehabilitation wards in England is not collected centrally, though we would expect trusts to pay close attention to such data.

The Government welcomes the findings of the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC’s) report and shares its concerns about inappropriate use of locked rehabilitation wards. The department will consider the implications in discussion with NHS England, NHS Improvement and the CQC.

Grouped Questions: HL1119 | HL1120
Q
Asked by Lord Boateng
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Secure Psychiatric Units: Ethnic Groups
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many patients from BME backgrounds spent a period of their care in locked wards in England during each of the last three years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

Data on the number of BME patients being treated in locked rehabilitation wards in England is not collected centrally, though we would expect trusts to pay close attention to such data.

The Government welcomes the findings of the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC’s) report and shares its concerns about inappropriate use of locked rehabilitation wards. The department will consider the implications in discussion with NHS England, NHS Improvement and the CQC.

Grouped Questions: HL1118 | HL1120
Q
Asked by Lord Boateng
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Secure Psychiatric Units: Ethnic Groups
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what conclusions they have drawn from the Care Quality Commission review The state of care in mental health services 2014 to 2017, published on 20 July, as to the numbers and experience of BME patients in locked wards across England.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

Data on the number of BME patients being treated in locked rehabilitation wards in England is not collected centrally, though we would expect trusts to pay close attention to such data.

The Government welcomes the findings of the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC’s) report and shares its concerns about inappropriate use of locked rehabilitation wards. The department will consider the implications in discussion with NHS England, NHS Improvement and the CQC.

Grouped Questions: HL1118 | HL1119
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Sports Competitors: Free Movement of People
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the UK's withdrawal from the EU on the free movement of elite athletes.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The Department recognises the importance of sport to the nation and within that the contribution of international talent, and the UK will seek to continue to attract the best of international talent across all sports. As the Government considers the options for a future immigration system we will also need to understand the potential impacts of any proposed changes in all parts of the UK. We will look to develop a system that works for all in consultation with all relevant sport stakeholders.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
The Senior Deputy Speaker
Parliament: Broadcasting
Lords
The Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the Written Answer by the Senior Deputy Speaker on 19 July (HL599), what was the full breakdown of the (1) £118,000 resource, and (2) £465,000 capital, costs of the Parliamentary Broadcasting ICT Programme.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2017

A full breakdown of the £118k resource costs and £465k capital costs of the Parliamentary Broadcasting ICT Programme is provided below.

Resource

£000

Staff related costs

41

Storage and maintenance costs

12

Broadcasting and IT costs

31

Consultancy costs

12

Market research services costs

22

118

Capital

£000

IT software

46

IT hardware

6

Broadcasting and sound equipment*

413

465

*The figure for capital spend on broadcasting and sound equipment includes investment in infrastructure and technology to maintain and enhance audio, video and broadcasting services, including a new Chamber audio system in each House which accounts for the bulk of this expenditure. New cameras, cabling, signal routing and monitoring equipment have also been installed.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Blood: Contamination
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether the findings of the 2009 independent report by Lord Archer of Sandwell on NHS supplied contaminated blood and blood products will be taken into account by the contaminated blood inquiry announced on 11 July.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The focus of the inquiry will be on establishing the truth of what happened.

Over the summer, the Government is consulting with those affected and key stakeholder groups to discuss the scope of the inquiry.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
The Senior Deputy Speaker
House of Lords: Wines
Lords
The Senior Deputy Speaker how many English (1) still, and (2) sparkling, wines are on sale in (a) retail, and (b) catering, outlets in the House of Lords.
A
Answered by: Lord Laming
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chairman of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf.

One English still wine is offered on the menu in the Peers’ Dining Room. One English sparkling wine is offered on the same menu. Both are also available on request in the Barry Room and for events booked through the House of Lords Banqueting Office. No English wines are currently on sale through any other catering outlet or through the House of Lords gift shop.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Microplastics: Food
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the risk to humans of microbeads and other plastics entering the human food chain.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

On the basis of current information, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) considers it is unlikely that the presence of the low levels of microplastic particles that have been reported to occur in certain types of seafood would cause harm to consumers. The FSA will continue to monitor and assess emerging information concerning microplastics in seafood.

Q
Asked by Lord Lucas
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
NHS: Drugs
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord O'Shaughnessy on 19 July (HL914), what plans they have to reduce the costs to the NHS of the supply of drugs such as Apomorphine that are long out of patent and simple and cheap to manufacture; and what consideration they have given to increasing supplies of such drugs by seeking suppliers who will invest in regulatory approvals in exchange for a fixed-price, fixed-term contract.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The cost of branded medicines to the National Health Service is controlled by the voluntary pharmaceutical price regulation scheme or the statutory medicines price regulation scheme. Often when patents expire, generic versions enter the market and, as a result of competition, prices often go down.

In primary care, the community pharmacy contractual framework provides an incentive for pharmacies to get the best medicines prices; in secondary care, a system of central tenders delivers similar levels of savings. In general, the system works well – the United Kingdom has the lowest generic prices across the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Drugs: Prices
Lords
Her Majesty's Government which public body is responsible for enforcing regulations concerning the retail prices of medicines; and what enforcement mechanisms are in place to sanction non-compliant retailers.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

The price of over-the-counter medicines charged by retailers is not subject to regulatory control. Competition between retailers acts to prevent excessive prices.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
HIV Infection: Foreign Nationals
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether the Department of Health has monitored risks associated with overseas visitors seeking or receiving HIV treatment, as set out in that Department's guidance on HIV treatment for overseas visitors in England from 1 October 2012; if so, how many such visitors have been identified; and whether any of those visitors were refused treatment.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 July 2017

From 1 October 2012, an amendment to the NHS (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations meant that HIV treatment was no longer chargeable to any overseas visitors. This means that no-one should be charged for or refused HIV treatment based on residency.

Public Health England monitors the country of birth of persons reported in England who are living with HIV infection and whether or not they are receiving HIV treatment according to their level of HIV-related immunosuppression. Information on their residency or visitor status is not recorded routinely by treating clinicians and therefore is not available.

Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 20 June 2016
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Human Trafficking: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the rainbow flag will be flown over the British Embassy in Turkey over the weekend commencing 24 June.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 20 June 2016
Home Office
Asylum: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of Médecins Sans Frontières’ refusal to take any funds from the EU in protest against the EU’s refugee policy, whether they will reconsider their support for the EU–Turkey refugee deal.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 20 June 2016
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Asylum: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with the government of Turkey about the reported use of tear gas and rubber bullets at a LGBT pride march in Istanbul.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 20 June 2016
The Lord Chairman of Committees
Asylum: Children
Lords
To ask the Chairman of Committees whether he has considered recommending to the relevant Committee of the House of Lords that at times of great national tragedies the House could hear inclusive prayers that reflect the national mood of grief and caring.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Q
Asked on: 20 June 2016
Ministry of Justice
Asylum: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the criteria approved by Ministers for use by the Parole Board when considering whether to authorise the release of prisoners serving indeterminate sentences.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Q
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Transport
Poverty
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to encourage the wider use of lane rental schemes, as introduced in London in 2012.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The most commonly used measure of poverty is relative low income.

The latest statistics from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data series show that there are: 2.7 million children, 5.7 million working-age adults, and 2.1 million pensioners in relative low income in the United Kingdom on a ‘before housing costs’ (BHC) basis.

Analysis of the HBAI data shows that there are 2.1 million families in relative low income BHC where at least one adult member works at least part-time.

This Government is committed to tackling the root causes of poverty, thereby preventing the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.

This is why we repealed the income-related targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 and replaced them with statutory measures that drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children, now and in the future.

The Department for Work and Pensions published Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families in April 2017. Here we set out further non-statutory indicators on a wider set of parental disadvantage and children’s outcomes, which will drive collective action on areas that matter in tackling disadvantage.

Grouped Questions: HL955 | HL954 | HL955
Q
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Transport
Poverty
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the various levels of subsidy available for travel on public transport and the effect such variations have on inequality; and whether they plan to modify their policies as a result of that assessment.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The most commonly used measure of poverty is relative low income.

The latest statistics from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data series show that there are: 2.7 million children, 5.7 million working-age adults, and 2.1 million pensioners in relative low income in the United Kingdom on a ‘before housing costs’ (BHC) basis.

Analysis of the HBAI data shows that there are 2.1 million families in relative low income BHC where at least one adult member works at least part-time.

This Government is committed to tackling the root causes of poverty, thereby preventing the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.

This is why we repealed the income-related targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 and replaced them with statutory measures that drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children, now and in the future.

The Department for Work and Pensions published Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families in April 2017. Here we set out further non-statutory indicators on a wider set of parental disadvantage and children’s outcomes, which will drive collective action on areas that matter in tackling disadvantage.

Grouped Questions: HL954 | HL954 | HL955
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Education
School Libraries
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect to publish their care leaver covenant.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

School libraries play an important role in encouraging pupils to read for pleasure. We believe that it should be for schools to decide whether to provide and maintain a library service for their pupils.

Head teachers do recognise the role libraries can play in improving young people’s literacy, and ensure that suitable library facilities are provided. It is also up to schools to decide how they run their library. While many head teachers, especially those in secondary schools, choose to employ a qualified librarian, this is not a statutory requirement.

We do not collect data on school library provision. However, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) indicated in 2011 that 92% of pupils in Year 5 in England were attending a school where there was a library. This was above the international average of 86%.

Grouped Questions: HL957 | HL956 | HL957
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department of Health
School Libraries
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what resources were allocated in, or are planned for, (1) 2016–17, (2) 2017–18, (3) 2018–19, and (4) 2019–20, for (a) university social work programmes via student bursaries and the Training Support Grant; (b) the Frontline social work trainee programme; (c) the Think Ahead trainee programme; (d) the Step Up to Social Work trainee programme; (e) social work teaching partnerships; and (f) the start-up and continuing costs for the accreditation of child and family social work.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

School libraries play an important role in encouraging pupils to read for pleasure. We believe that it should be for schools to decide whether to provide and maintain a library service for their pupils.

Head teachers do recognise the role libraries can play in improving young people’s literacy, and ensure that suitable library facilities are provided. It is also up to schools to decide how they run their library. While many head teachers, especially those in secondary schools, choose to employ a qualified librarian, this is not a statutory requirement.

We do not collect data on school library provision. However, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) indicated in 2011 that 92% of pupils in Year 5 in England were attending a school where there was a library. This was above the international average of 86%.

Grouped Questions: HL956 | HL956 | HL957
Q
(Easington)
Asked on: 21 June 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Private Property: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, if he will grant local authorities the power to insist that landlords or home owners maintain their properties to an acceptable standard where that condition is having a negative impact upon the local community.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Local authorities already have strong powers to tackle poor property conditions.

We encourage local authorities to take action where properties are neglected and their condition adversely affects the amenity of an area. There are already extensive powers available to authorities which range from notices under section 215 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 which can deal with derelict land and buildings to section 29 of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1982 for works on unoccupied buildings.

Council and housing association landlords are responsible for most repairs to their housing stock. Social landlords are obliged, by law, to maintain the structure and exterior of their properties.

All properties in the social and private sectors must comply with the Housing Health and Safety Rating System. Where a property has serious hazards that present a risk to health and safety, local authorities can carry out an assessment under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System. If they are aware of a serious hazard, they are under a duty to take appropriate action to address it.

Q
(Easington)
Asked on: 21 June 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Letting Agents: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what criteria were used to select the location of letting agents' fees ban workshops.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The locations of the letting agent fee ban workshops were chosen to make the exercise as inclusive as possible to those interested in attending. Venues were selected based on availability, size and ease of access.

Q
Asked by John Healey
(Wentworth and Dearne)
Asked on: 04 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Building Regulations: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, if he will publish any research or work commissioned in preparation for the revision of Approved Document B of the Building Regulations.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Following the tragedy at Grenfell Tower, we will need to consider the position on guidance further alongside the Prime Minister's commitment to look at wider issues.

Q
Asked by Dan Jarvis
(Barnsley Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 July 2017
Department for Education
GCE A-level: Disadvantaged
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Social Mobility Commission's report: Time for Change: an assessment of government policies on social mobility 1997-2017, what steps her Department plans to take to reduce the attainment gap identified between disadvantaged young people and other students at A level or equivalent.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The Government welcomes the Commission’s report, which considers efforts to improve social mobility over the last twenty years. The Commission rightly concludes that too often life chances can be determined not by effort and ability, but by where you come from, who your parents are and which school you attend.

Educational achievement is at the heart of this Government’s commitment to make ours a meritocratic country. This is why we invested around £552m on disadvantaged learners aged 16-19 in 2016-17, on top of standard funding rates.

The attainment gap between those eligible and those not eligible for Free School Meals at age 15 achieving level 3 by age 19 has decreased from 26.4% in 2005 to 24.5% in 2016, but we know there is more to do. The department is pursuing a range of policies aimed at benefiting disadvantaged learners. Improvements in the delivery of high-quality basic skills and careers advice benefit disadvantaged learners by ensuring they have the qualifications, support and experience needed to get on in life, and have access to clear advice on their options. Funding uplifts support apprentices from disadvantaged areas, care leavers and those with learning difficulties and disabilities.

Traineeships, programmes combining pre-employment training, work experience and English and maths are available for young people aged 16-24 (and for young people with an Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plan up to academic age 25) who are within six months of being ready to enter the labour market.

Latest data shows that there were 24,100 traineeship starts in the 15/16 academic year (14,700 aged 16-18 and 9,400 aged 19-24). Supported internships can be life-changing opportunities for young people with a SEN statement or EHC plan aged 16-24 who need more help to move from education into employment.

Q
(Derby North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Building Regulations: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2017 to Question 750, on building regulations: fires, if the Government will make an assessment of the merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require the retrofitting of automatic fire suppression systems in all residential premises.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 28 July 2017
Holding answer received on 17 July 2017

There has been a requirement in Building Regulations guidance since 2007 for new flats over 30 metres to have a sprinkler system. Following the tragedy at Grenfell Tower the Prime Minister has committed to look at wider issues.

Q
Asked by Lord Adonis
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for International Trade
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants at the Department for International Trade have undertaken training in negotiating skills; and how much has been budgeted in 2017–18 for further such training.
A
Answered by: Lord Price
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Training on trade policy and trade negotiations is provided predominately by the Trade Policy and Negotiations Faculty. The role of the Faculty is to build trade policy and negotiations capability in Departments across Her Majesty's Government.

To date over 200 DIT staff have undertaken trade policy training offered by the Trade Faculty or organised directly by DIT.

The Faculty has a training budget of c. £1,600,000 for 2017-18, which will cover training on a range of trade policy topics and negotiations. DIT’s Trade Policy Group has a training budget of c.£900,000 for 2017-18; this budget covers a range of learning and development, including but not limited to trade policy and negotiations.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government when they will publish updated guidance on (1) safeguarding children who may have been trafficked, and (2) care of unaccompanied and trafficked children.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord Nash on 20 January (HL4582), to what extent the training for foster carers and support workers commissioned from the Refugee Council and End Child Prostitution and Trafficking addresses (1) the indicators of modern slavery, and (2) particular risks and needs of children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Nash on 20 January (HL4582), in which local authorities was training given to foster carers and support workers by the Refugee Council and ECPAT to help those carers and workers care for unaccompanied asylum-seeker or refugee children.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL767 | HL768
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Nash on 20 January (HL4582), what plans they have to commission further training for foster carers and support workers to assist those carers and workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL768
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what measures are in place to ensure that children who may have been victims of modern slavery are placed with foster carers or support workers who have received specific training on how to care for such children.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

There are no plans to update the practice guidance ‘Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked’. The revised statutory guidance ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ will be published this autumn.

The training for foster carers and support workers that DfE commissioned from the Refugee Council and ECPAT enables those caring for unaccompanied and trafficked children to understand the challenges and risks facing these children, and equips participants with the knowledge and tools to respond effectively to their needs. Participants were also provided with access to an e-learning course to help recognise the needs of child and adult victims of trafficking and guidance on actions carers and professionals should take to identify and safeguard victims.

Foster carers and support workers attended training courses located in 48 local authorities (see list below). Training was not limited to carers from those authorities.

The forthcoming safeguarding strategy for unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children will address the need for any additional training required by foster carers and support workers to care for children who are, or might be, victims of human trafficking and exploitation.

Further to the training which has recently commissioned, the statutory guidance on ‘The care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children’ states that “Everyone involved in the care of unaccompanied and trafficked children should be trained to recognise and understand the particular issues likely to be faced by these children. This includes recognising the indicators of trafficking as a child’s previous history or current experience of being trafficked might not be apparent on entering care."

List of local authorities where the training by ECPAT and Refugee Council was located:

Bolton

Bournemouth

Bristol

Bromley

Cambridgeshire

Camden

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Croydon

Derbyshire

Devon

Doncaster

East Riding

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Haringey

Harrow

Hertfordshire

Kent

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leeds

Leicester City

Leicestershire

Liverpool

Manchester

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

Nottingham City

Oldham

Sheffield

Shropshire

Somerset

Staffordshire

Suffolk

Sunderland

Thurrock

Walsall

Warrington

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Worcestershire

Grouped Questions: HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767 | HL768 | HL764 | HL765 | HL766 | HL767
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement of additional resources for services for vulnerable children and families through the Children's Social Care Innovation Programme, what additional amounts will be allocated to (1) each of the Partners in Practice local authorities, and (2) Spring Consortium, to facilitate and monitor the activities of Partners in Practice, for each of the years (a) 2016–17, (b) 2017–18, and (c) 2018–19.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Since the announcement of the Partners in Practice programme in 2016, no additional funding has been allocated to the Partners in Practice local authorities. The Partners in Practice programme aims to model excellence in children’s social care and increase capacity in the sector to drive improvement. An independent evaluation of the programme is currently underway. This evaluation will provide the Department with a robust mechanism for measuring the impact of the projects and the conditions required for change. It will also enable the Department to share insights and learning with the sector to achieve wider reform.

The Spring Consortium is contracted by the Department to support the delivery of the Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme. While this includes providing some support to deliver the Partners in Practice programme, no specific amount of funding has been ring-fenced for this purpose.

Q
Asked on: 17 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government why parents who submit an online application for 30 hours free childcare to the Department for Education website are sent a holding response.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

To be eligible for 30 hours free childcare parents must meet certain criteria which are checked before a parent is given a decision. The majority of these checks happen in real time. There are some cases where additional checks may be required.

As with all digital services, the childcare service is continually monitored and performance is assessed. Updates are made regularly as a result of these assessments.

Grouped Questions: HL874 | HL875
Q
Asked on: 17 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, following submission of an application to receive 30 hours free childcare, how long the Department for Education takes to respond to parents confirming their eligibility.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

To be eligible for 30 hours free childcare parents must meet certain criteria which are checked before a parent is given a decision. The majority of these checks happen in real time. There are some cases where additional checks may be required.

As with all digital services, the childcare service is continually monitored and performance is assessed. Updates are made regularly as a result of these assessments.

Grouped Questions: HL873 | HL875
Q
Asked on: 17 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to review the accessibility of the online process to register for 30 hours of free childcare; and if so, when that review will take place.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

To be eligible for 30 hours free childcare parents must meet certain criteria which are checked before a parent is given a decision. The majority of these checks happen in real time. There are some cases where additional checks may be required.

As with all digital services, the childcare service is continually monitored and performance is assessed. Updates are made regularly as a result of these assessments.

Grouped Questions: HL873 | HL874
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to audit the training given to teachers on how to administer adrenaline and handle severe allergic reactions in children.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

We know how important it is that children with allergies and other medical conditions are supported to enjoy a full education. That is why we introduced a new duty to require governing bodies to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions, and have provided statutory guidance outlining schools’ responsibilities in this area.

To provide specific support for pupils with allergies, we are working with the Department of Health to develop new guidance on the use of adrenaline auto-injectors in schools. This follows the recent publication of the Human Medicines (Amendment) Regulations 2017, which allow schools to hold spare adrenaline auto injectors, without a prescription, for use in emergencies. The revised regulations will come into effect on 1 October 2017.

Q
Asked by Lord Lansley
Asked on: 17 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government under what circumstances a Government financial guarantee to a capital investment project will lead to the definition of expenditure on that project being classified as public expenditure.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

If a capital investment project involves both the private sector and the public sector, an assessment is required to determine the level of government intervention in a project. This will also determine whether government is bearing a majority of the risks and rewards associated with the project and therefore incurring public expenditure for the capital investment of the project. The assessment would be made by the independent Office for National Statistics (ONS) using the national accounts conceptual framework, the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union (ESA10)[1] enforceable EU Regulation No. 549/2013 and associated guidance in the Manual on Government Deficit and Debt[2] and a guide to the Statistical Treatment of PPPs[3] published by Eurostat.

[1] http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/Annexes/nasa_10_f_esms_an1.pdf

[2] http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3859598/7203647/KS-GQ-16-001-EN-N.pdf/5cfae6dd-29d8-4487-80ac-37f76cd1f012

[3] http://www.eib.org/epec/resources/publications/epec_eurostat_guide_ppp

Q
Asked on: 17 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to improve small and medium-sized enterprises’ access to redress and compensation from banks; and what assessment they have made of the recommendation by the BankingFutures initiative to expand the remit of the Financial Ombudsman to widen support for SMEs.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The Government will consider the issue of small and medium-sized enterprises’ access to redress and compensation from banks when the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) publishes its feedback statement on its discussion paper on SMEs as users of financial services. The remit of the Financial Ombudsman Service is a matter for the FCA.

In April, the FCA published feedback to the consultation on their Mission Statement. In this they committed to consult on widening the remit of the Financial Ombudsman Service. They will do so shortly, using a formal consultation alongside its feedback on its SME discussion paper.

Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is the cost of training a teacher through (1) Teach First, (2) School Direct, and (3) initial teacher training courses.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Comparing the costs of different routes through initial teacher training is complex; these vary significantly by subject and degree class due to different bursary rates. School Direct Salaried and Teach First trainees do not receive a bursary.

The NAO report, Training New Teachers (10 February 2016) looked at average costs for academic year 2013/14; this is the latest available comparison of teacher training costs by route.

The cost of training a new teacher through each of these routes is listed below:

Teacher training route

Cost of training per trainee

Teach First

£36,000

School Direct (salary)

£20,000

School Direct (fee)

£20,000

School-centred provider

£21,000

Higher education institute

£19,000

Since these figures were published, the Department has procured a new contract with Teach First, with a reduced average cost per trainee. Please see the table below showing the bursaries available for the 2017/18 training year indicating the scale of difference across subjects and degree class. The cost for trainees on salaried routes will also vary by location to reflect salary differences between London and elsewhere. In addition, the Teach First cost includes recruitment costs (£2,600 per trainee).

Bursary rates for 2017/18:

Scholarship

1st

2.1

2.2

Other

Primary

£3,000

£0

£0

£0

Primary maths

£6,000

£6,000

£6,000

£0

Art & Design

£0

£0

£0

£0

Biology

£15,000

£12,000

£10,000

£0

Business studies

£0

£0

£0

£0

Chemistry

£27,500

£25,000

£20,000

£20,000

£0

Classics

£25,000

£25,000

£25,000

£0

Computing

£27,500

£25,000

£25,000

£25,000

£0

D&T

£12,000

£9,000

£0

£0

Drama

£0

£0

£0

£0

English

£9,000

£9,000

£0

£0

Geography

£27,500

£25,000

£25,000

£25,000

£0

History

£9,000

£4,000

£0

£0

Maths

£27,500

£25,000

£25,000

£25,000

£0

MFL

£27,500

£25,000

£25,000

£25,000

£0

Music

£9,000

£4,000

£0

£0

Others

£0

£0

£0

£0

PE

£0

£0

£0

£0

Physics

£30,000

£30,000

£25,000

£25,000

£0

RE

£9,000

£4,000

£0

£0

Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what plans they have for using any underspend on the Sixth Form College budget.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Budgets for sixth form colleges are not set separately from budgets for other providers. The overall 16-19 budget set for each financial year is a forecast of anticipated spend. Actual spend varies from this because it is based on set funding rates per student. If actual student numbers are lower than forecast, the department works in conjunction with the Treasury to try to reallocate any underspends to other priorities in a way that maximises value for money. This could include a proposal to redeploy the funding to the next financial year. If alternative value for money activities cannot be identified, the funding is returned to the Treasury to support the overall fiscal position.

Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what requirements apply to the setting up of a teacher supply agency; and  how such agencies are regulated.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations 2003 govern the setting up of a teacher supply agency.

There have been some updates but this is the premise of the regulations. Enforcement lies with the Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate (EAS). The EAS is the body that polices the Conduct Regulations, which can impose heavy fines on agencies that do not comply with the rules and may stop them from trading. If it is clear that an agency is in breach of the regulations then the EAS should be contacted immediately.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Pay
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to respond to the recommendation in the Low Pay Commission Report 2015 that payslips of hourly-paid staff states the hours individuals are being paid for; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 28 July 2017
Holding answer received on 20 July 2017

Following the Low Pay Commission’s recommendation, the Government is engaging with stakeholders to evaluate the proposal in detail, including how it is practically implemented. We will consider the recommendation in the light of this evidence and make a formal response to the Low Pay Commission in the Autumn.

Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of (1) children, (2) adults, and (3) working families, living in poverty across the United Kingdom; and what long-term plan they have to prevent such poverty.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The most commonly used measure of poverty is relative low income.

The latest statistics from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data series show that there are: 2.7 million children, 5.7 million working-age adults, and 2.1 million pensioners in relative low income in the United Kingdom on a ‘before housing costs’ (BHC) basis.

Analysis of the HBAI data shows that there are 2.1 million families in relative low income BHC where at least one adult member works at least part-time.

This Government is committed to tackling the root causes of poverty, thereby preventing the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.

This is why we repealed the income-related targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 and replaced them with statutory measures that drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children, now and in the future.

The Department for Work and Pensions published Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families in April 2017. Here we set out further non-statutory indicators on a wider set of parental disadvantage and children’s outcomes, which will drive collective action on areas that matter in tackling disadvantage.

Grouped Questions: HL954 | HL955 | HL955
Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Buscombe on 13 July (HL Deb, cols 1296–98), what emphasis they place on the prevention of poverty; and how they are working to ensure that the prevention of poverty is prioritised by every Department.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The most commonly used measure of poverty is relative low income.

The latest statistics from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data series show that there are: 2.7 million children, 5.7 million working-age adults, and 2.1 million pensioners in relative low income in the United Kingdom on a ‘before housing costs’ (BHC) basis.

Analysis of the HBAI data shows that there are 2.1 million families in relative low income BHC where at least one adult member works at least part-time.

This Government is committed to tackling the root causes of poverty, thereby preventing the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.

This is why we repealed the income-related targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 and replaced them with statutory measures that drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children, now and in the future.

The Department for Work and Pensions published Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families in April 2017. Here we set out further non-statutory indicators on a wider set of parental disadvantage and children’s outcomes, which will drive collective action on areas that matter in tackling disadvantage.

Grouped Questions: HL954 | HL955 | HL954
Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they will ensure that every school has an adequate library with qualified staff.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

School libraries play an important role in encouraging pupils to read for pleasure. We believe that it should be for schools to decide whether to provide and maintain a library service for their pupils.

Head teachers do recognise the role libraries can play in improving young people’s literacy, and ensure that suitable library facilities are provided. It is also up to schools to decide how they run their library. While many head teachers, especially those in secondary schools, choose to employ a qualified librarian, this is not a statutory requirement.

We do not collect data on school library provision. However, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) indicated in 2011 that 92% of pupils in Year 5 in England were attending a school where there was a library. This was above the international average of 86%.

Grouped Questions: HL956 | HL957 | HL957
Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many, and what proportion of, schools in the UK have a library; and how they assess the quality of such libraries and their staff.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

School libraries play an important role in encouraging pupils to read for pleasure. We believe that it should be for schools to decide whether to provide and maintain a library service for their pupils.

Head teachers do recognise the role libraries can play in improving young people’s literacy, and ensure that suitable library facilities are provided. It is also up to schools to decide how they run their library. While many head teachers, especially those in secondary schools, choose to employ a qualified librarian, this is not a statutory requirement.

We do not collect data on school library provision. However, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) indicated in 2011 that 92% of pupils in Year 5 in England were attending a school where there was a library. This was above the international average of 86%.

Grouped Questions: HL956 | HL957 | HL956
Q
Asked by Lord Birt
Asked on: 18 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is their response to the analysis by the Office for Budget Responsibility that the UK's public finances are ill-positioned to withstand (1) a possible recession, (2) higher inflation, and (3) an increase in interest rates.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The Office for Budget Responsibility’s (OBR) Fiscal Risks Report demonstrates that the public finances remain vulnerable to shocks. To enhance our resilience to such shocks it is vital that we get debt falling.

To this end, we remain committed to bringing the public finances back to balance by the mid-2020s, with interim targets to reduce the structural deficit below 2% of GDP and get debt falling as a share of GDP by 2020-21.

The government continues to consider carefully the findings within the OBR’s report. As required under the Charter for Budget Responsibility, the government will formally respond to the issues raised within the next year.

Q
Asked by Lord Empey
Asked on: 18 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what are the sources of funds for the additional £1 billon investment announced for Northern Ireland in June.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The Government routinely makes adjustments to public spending throughout the year and will deal with the cost of additional resources for the Northern Ireland Executive within our overall plans in this way.

Q
Asked by Lord Empey
Asked on: 18 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what were the volumes and nature of smuggled goods seized along the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland in the last five years for which figures are available; and what estimate they have made of the amount of duty evaded.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) records statistics for smuggling seized goods does not have that level of detail required to answer. Therefore without referencing individual cases it is not possible to identify which ones involved smuggling.

Q
Asked by Lord Empey
Asked on: 18 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many convictions there were of persons charged with smuggling offences along the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland for the last two years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) records statistics for smuggling offences does not have that level of detail required to answer. Therefore without referencing individual cases it is not possible to identify which ones involved smuggling.

Q
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is the budget for the Health and Safety Executive for 2017–18; how many inspectors it expects to employ in 2017–18; and how many inspectors it employed in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 28 July 2017

HSE’s net budget for 2017-18 is £136 million (which includes planned expenditure of £232 million, offset by planned income of £96 million).

During 2017-18 we are seeking to maintain inspector numbers at or around the level as at 31 March 2017 which is stated below, along with the four previous years.

Number of HSE inspectors at 31 March

31 March 2013

31 March 2014

31 March 2015

31 March 2016

31 March 2017

1,115

1,051

1,038

1,037

988

Asked on: 18 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what progress have they made in reducing the national debt.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

In 2010 the government inherited the largest deficit since the Second World War at 9.9% of GDP in 2009-10. Since then the government has reduced the deficit by three quarters to 2.4% of GDP last year. Without this reduction the level of debt would be even higher than its level of 86.8% of GDP at the end of March 2017.

The government has committed to ensure Public Sector Net Debt as a share of GDP is falling in 2020-21. In their March 2017 forecast the Office for Budget Responsibility forecast that the government will meet this target two years early in 2018-19.

Asked on: 18 July 2017
HM Treasury
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken, if any, to engage with the European Parliament's inquiry into Money Laundering, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The Government has engaged constructively with the European Parliament's Committee of Inquiry into Money Laundering, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion‎.

In February 2017, the previous Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the previous Economic Secretary to the Treasury wrote to the Chair of the European Parliament to set out the extensive recent steps the UK had taken in these areas. In the same month, Members of the Committee visited London and met with senior officials from the UK's cross-agency Panama Papers Taskforce to discuss their important work.

Q
Asked by Lord Patten
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 5 July (HL147), how many incursions by vessels they have recorded; and what nationalities are represented.
A
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Within the Marine Management Organisation’s (MMO) current by-law areas there have been 6 incursions which have resulted in further investigation. The vessel nationalities were English and French.

Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Lords
Her Majesty's Government which EU-based environmental legislation and regulations will be transposed into UK law through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act, (1) without change, (2) with minor changes to enable operability, and (3) with substantial changes requiring secondary legislation to ensure operability.
A
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill ensures, so far as possible, that the same rules and laws will apply on the day after exit as on the day before.

All Government Departments are currently reviewing the EU laws that apply in their policy areas and how our withdrawal from the EU will affect the operation of those laws.

Where laws need to be fixed, the Government will ensure this is done. There are decades of EU law to consider, and we must ensure our statute book works on exit and that we provide the maximum possible certainty for individuals and businesses as we leave the EU.

This Government is committed to be the first generation to leave the natural environment in a better state than we inherited it. Leaving the EU means we now have a unique opportunity to design a set of policies to drive environmental improvement with a powerful and permanent impact, tailored to the needs of our country. This will make sure we can create a healthy environment and strong economy – and delivering on our commitment to leave the environment in a better state than we found it.

Q
Asked by Patrick Grady
(Glasgow North)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
British Indian Ocean Territory: Minimum Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what information his Department holds on whether the base contractor or other employers on Diego Garcia are required to pay a legal minimum wage.
A
Corrected answer by: Sir Alan Duncan
Corrected on: 28 July 2017
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 26 July 2017.
The correct answer should have been:

The British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) Employment Ordinance No.7 of 1984 (as amended) covers various aspects of employment law in the Territory and is available in the House of Commons library. BIOT ordinances do not extend to the Territory. BIOT ordinances do not provide for a legal minimum wage and UK minimum wage legislation does not extend to the Territory. As base contractors on Diego Garcia are contracted directly by the United States, we do not hold information regarding employees and employment practice.

A
Answered by: Sir Alan Duncan
Answered on: 26 July 2017

The British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) Employment Ordinance No.7 of 1984 (as amended) covers various aspects of employment law in the Territory and is available in the House of Commons library. BIOT ordinances do not extend to the Territory. BIOT ordinances do not provide for a legal minimum wage and UK minimum wage legislation does not extend to the Territory. As base contractors on Diego Garcia are contracted directly by the United States, we do not hold information regarding employees and employment practice.

Q
Asked by Lord Moynihan
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Education
Pupils: Health
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what consultation the Department for Education held with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the decision to cut the Healthy Pupils Capital Programme.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Officials from DfE and DCMS work together closely across a number of programmes to ensure that all pupils have the opportunity to lead healthy, active lives.

As announced by the Secretary of State on 17 July, £100m of Healthy Pupils Capital Funding will be used to pay for facilities to support PE, after school activities and healthy eating. In addition, the Primary PE and School Sport Premium will be doubled to £320m a year from September 2017. The premium funds additional and sustainable improvements to the provision of PE and sport in primary schools to encourage the development of healthy, active lifestyles.

The Department allocates around £1.2bn per year of capital funding directly to schools and their responsible bodies for them to invest in maintaining and improving their school buildings and facilities. They can decide how funding is spent, and if they wish they can of course target sports facilities where they are the local priority.

Grouped Questions: HL1062
Q
Asked by Lord Moynihan
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Sports
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, following the decision to cut the Healthy Pupils Capital Programme, what additional resources, if any, they will make available for schools to invest in after-school sports clubs and sports facilities.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Officials from DfE and DCMS work together closely across a number of programmes to ensure that all pupils have the opportunity to lead healthy, active lives.

As announced by the Secretary of State on 17 July, £100m of Healthy Pupils Capital Funding will be used to pay for facilities to support PE, after school activities and healthy eating. In addition, the Primary PE and School Sport Premium will be doubled to £320m a year from September 2017. The premium funds additional and sustainable improvements to the provision of PE and sport in primary schools to encourage the development of healthy, active lifestyles.

The Department allocates around £1.2bn per year of capital funding directly to schools and their responsible bodies for them to invest in maintaining and improving their school buildings and facilities. They can decide how funding is spent, and if they wish they can of course target sports facilities where they are the local priority.

Grouped Questions: HL1061
Q
Asked by Lord Laird
Asked on: 19 July 2017
HM Treasury
Overseas Loans: Republic of Ireland
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much the Republic of Ireland owes the UK relating to the £338 million loan provided following the financial crisis; and what are the arrangements for repayment.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 28 July 2017

I refer the noble Lord to the most recent statutory report which the Treasury provided to Parliament as required by Section 2 of the Loans to Ireland Act 2010. The last report was laid in Parliament on 18 April 2017 and is available in the Printed Paper Office.

The timetable for repayment set out in this report remains unchanged.

Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Horticulture: Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to promote the benefits of horticulture and gardening-based social activities (1) nationally, and (2) in schools and colleges, including as part of any reforms to the national curriculum; and if so, how.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Almost all primary schools in England offer gardening based activities in one form or another. In primary, the National Curriculum for science sets out that pupils must be taught to identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including trees. It also recommends that schools should use the local environment throughout the year to explore and answer questions about plants growing in their habitat.

We have no plans to make changes to the National Curriculum, or to promote any specific subject. The Royal Horticultural Society, however, does great work to promote gardening in schools. Their campaign provides free resources to inspire and support schools to provide children with gardening opportunities.

Q
Asked by Lord Jones
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Apprentices
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many apprenticeships there are in England.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

This information about apprenticeships and their demographics is published for England in the further education and skills statistical first release. The information can be found in the main tables 2 and 6 (2015 to 2016 academic year), and 21 (2016 to 2017 academic year reported to date).

The latest publication is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/further-education-and-skills-july-2017.

Previous and future publications are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

Grouped Questions: HL1155
Q
Asked by Lord Jones
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Apprentices
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is the gender balance of those undertaking apprenticeships in England.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

This information about apprenticeships and their demographics is published for England in the further education and skills statistical first release. The information can be found in the main tables 2 and 6 (2015 to 2016 academic year), and 21 (2016 to 2017 academic year reported to date).

The latest publication is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/further-education-and-skills-july-2017.

Previous and future publications are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

Grouped Questions: HL1154
Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animals: Exports
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what welfare measures they are taking to reduce or eliminate the export of live animals from the UK.
A
Answered on: 28 July 2017

Once we leave the European Union, and in line with our manifesto commitment, we can take early steps to control the export of live farm animals for slaughter. We are considering all options.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much money was advanced in total for Advanced Learner Loans in 2015–16.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The total outlay for new and continuing learners funded by an Advanced Learner Loan in the 2015-16 financial year was £162.1 million.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much money was advanced for Advanced Learner Loans in relation to qualifications at Level 4 or higher in 2015–16.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The total outlay for new and continuing learners funded by an Advanced Learner Loan for eligible qualifications at Level 4 or higher in the 2015-16 financial year was £8.625 million.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, how much money was advanced for Advanced Learner Loans in the first six months of financial year 2016–17.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The total outlay for new and continuing learners funded by an Advanced Learner Loan in the first six months of the 2016-17 financial year was £90.9 million.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much money was advanced for Advanced Learner Loans in 2016–17.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

The total outlay for new and continuing learners funded by an Advanced Learner Loan in the 2016-17 financial year was £236.3 million.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much of the Department for Education budget was allocated for Advanced Learner Loans in 2016–17.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 28 July 2017

In the annual Skills Funding Letter 2016-17, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills set out an Advanced Learner Loans outlay budget to the Skills Funding Agency of £260 million.

Q
Asked on: 30 June 2016
Cabinet Office
Groceries Code Adjudicator
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the event of the UK's withdrawal from the EU, whether they plan to amend domestic legislation prior to the ratification of any final outcome of negotiations with the EU.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Government published the statutory review of the Grocery Code Adjudicator on 19 July. This review considered the Grocery Code Adjudicator’s performance within the current remit.

The Government separately launched a Call for Evidence to consider whether the remit should be extended. The Government is considering the evidence submitted through the Call for Evidence including considering the position of indirect suppliers within the dairy sector. The Government will respond in due course.

The Grocery Code Adjudicator can already investigate suspected breaches of the Code. It has published statutory guidance on how it will carry out investigation and enforcement functions on GOV.UK (GCA Statutory Guidance on Enforcement and Investigations).

The review decided that the maximum level of fines the Grocery Code Adjudicator could impose would not be amended at this time.

Grouped Questions: HL917 | HL916 | HL917
Q
Asked on: 30 June 2016
Cabinet Office
Groceries Code Adjudicator
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to table motions in both Houses of Parliament to enable Parliament to debate the negotiations for the UK exiting the EU holistically, or whether they intend to table motions to debate individual elements of the negotiations.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Government published the statutory review of the Grocery Code Adjudicator on 19 July. This review considered the Grocery Code Adjudicator’s performance within the current remit.

The Government separately launched a Call for Evidence to consider whether the remit should be extended. The Government is considering the evidence submitted through the Call for Evidence including considering the position of indirect suppliers within the dairy sector. The Government will respond in due course.

The Grocery Code Adjudicator can already investigate suspected breaches of the Code. It has published statutory guidance on how it will carry out investigation and enforcement functions on GOV.UK (GCA Statutory Guidance on Enforcement and Investigations).

The review decided that the maximum level of fines the Grocery Code Adjudicator could impose would not be amended at this time.

Grouped Questions: HL916 | HL916 | HL917
Q
Asked by Rachel Reeves
(Leeds West)
Asked on: 21 June 2017
Department for Education
Apprentices: Self-employed
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to address the fact that self-employed workers are less likely to get onto apprenticeships as they are not on the payroll for PAYE and therefore not part of the levy calculation.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

Apprenticeships are paid jobs and availability is determined by employers, both small and large, choosing to offer apprenticeships and recruit apprentices.

The UK-wide Apprenticeship Levy will enable us to fund the step change needed to achieve 3 million quality apprenticeship starts in England by 2020, benefitting employers and learners alike.

Supporting and growing apprenticeships amongst smaller employers who won’t be asked to pay the levy is critical to us. The government will pay 90% of the apprenticeship training and assessment costs (up to the maximum amount of government funding available for that apprenticeship) and the employer will only pay a 10% contribution. We will extend government support to 100% for the smallest employers taking on younger apprentices.

We are undertaking a wide range of activity to ensure employers of all sizes are aware of how they can make the most of the opportunities presented by apprenticeship reforms.

Q
Asked by Martyn Day
(Linlithgow and East Falkirk)
Asked on: 26 June 2017
Department for Education
Migrant Workers: Linlithgow and East Falkirk
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost to businesses in Linlithgow and East Falkirk constituency of the Immigration Skills charge for the current financial year.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Immigration Skills Charge was introduced on 6 April 2017. It is a charge on UK employers who sponsor workers from outside the European Economic Area through the Tier 2 skilled worker route.

We have not modelled the cost of the Immigration Skills Charge on any individual business. The cost will depend on whether employers choose to use the Tier 2 route and will vary depending on the number of Certificates of Sponsorship employers choose to assign, whether they pay the standard or reduced rate, and the length of time an employer chooses to employ a worker for.

Q
(Blackpool South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 June 2017
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department plans to publish the most recent advanced learner loan applications figures.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

We will publish the final advanced learner loans application information for the 2016 to 2017 academic year in October 2017.


Q
Asked by Esther McVey
(Tatton)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Department for Education
Pupils: Per Capita Costs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average (a) cash and (b) per pupil funding is for (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Department primarily allocates revenue funding for schools at local authority level, and does not identify funding for primary and secondary schools separately. The table in the attachment shows per pupil revenue funding figures from 2012-13 to 2017-18 for each local authority.

Figures are not directly comparable from year to year: in 2012-13 local authorities were allocated a General Unit of Funding (GUF), which covered schools, high needs and early years funding. From 2013-14, this was split into separate schools, high needs and early years blocks. Schools block allocations for 2017-18 reflect the most recent spending decisions by individual local authorities, including transfers between the schools and high needs block.

The schools block allocation for all individual schools for 2016-17 are published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/schools-block-funding-allocations-2016-to-2017.

1613_1718_attachment (Excel SpreadSheet, 27.39 KB)
Grouped Questions: 1613
Q
Asked by Esther McVey
(Tatton)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Tatton
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) cash and (b) per pupil funding has been provided to schools in Tatton constituency in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Department primarily allocates revenue funding for schools at local authority level, and does not identify funding for primary and secondary schools separately. The table in the attachment shows per pupil revenue funding figures from 2012-13 to 2017-18 for each local authority.

Figures are not directly comparable from year to year: in 2012-13 local authorities were allocated a General Unit of Funding (GUF), which covered schools, high needs and early years funding. From 2013-14, this was split into separate schools, high needs and early years blocks. Schools block allocations for 2017-18 reflect the most recent spending decisions by individual local authorities, including transfers between the schools and high needs block.

The schools block allocation for all individual schools for 2016-17 are published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/schools-block-funding-allocations-2016-to-2017.

1613_1718_attachment (Excel SpreadSheet, 27.39 KB)
Grouped Questions: 1718
Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 05 July 2017
Department for Education
Skilled Workers: Vacancies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 26 June 2017 to Question 233, what steps are being taken to ensure that ongoing skills gaps of all types are filled.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Government wants to create a world-beating technical education system and is investing heavily to ensure that it delivers the skills that the economy needs.

We will deliver 3 million apprenticeships by 2020, and drive up the quality of apprenticeships to ensure they deliver the skills employers need.

We are developing a system of technical education based on 15 new technical routes and introducing new qualifications, known as T-levels, which will provide clear pathways to jobs.

We are also strengthening the provider base, including by establishing a network of new Institutes of Technology specialising in delivering higher-level technical skills.

Q
Asked by Mary Creagh
(Wakefield)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Cabinet Office
Public Sector: Buildings
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his oral contribution of 26 June 2017, Official Report, column 348, if he will list the public sector buildings which are now undergoing checks.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 27 July 2017

Our priority has been to identify and test buildings clad in Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) and which, are either social or private rented housing, or public sector buildings meeting certain height thresholds.

We are continuing to receive and analyse data on the wider public sector estate. There are range of public sector buildings currently being checked including hospitals, schools, prisons and probation facilities, care homes, military accommodation and other buildings used for overnight accommodation.

Where screening tests indicate that ACM samples would not meet the limited combustibility requirements of the current Building Regulations guidance, the Government will inform the building owner and notify the fire and rescue service and local authority of the test result. Clear guidance has been issued to ensure the safety of buildings and occupants. Where appropriate, organisations are working with the fire and rescue service to put in place precautionary safety checks and measures.

Q
(Glasgow Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Women and Equalities
Females: Voting Rights
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when the £5 million fund to celebrate the centenary of the Representation of the People Act 1918 announced in the Spring Budget 2017 will be open for applications.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The government has set up a £5m fund to help celebrate this important occasion, which extended voting rights to women for the first time. The fund will help build a legacy for the future by educating young people about this important milestone and to inspiring women to get more involved in politics at all levels.

This funding will be available for projects in England, and details including application criteria will be announced in due course.

The Barnett formula has been applied to this funding in the usual way and it is for the devolved administrations to decide whether, and how, they choose to mark the centenary.

Q
Asked by Lord Jopling
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government which higher education providers have declined to participate in the Teaching Excellence Framework.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) is a voluntary process. Providers opt to participate, rather than opting out. The Higher Education Funding Council, who are responsible for delivering the TEF, have published a list of providers who have opted in on their website: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/tefoutcomes/.

Q
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether the Prime Minister raised the issue of potential cuts to the Fulbright Programme as a result of the US administration's budget proposals during her meeting with President Trump at the recent G20 summit.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 27 July 2017

No, the Prime Minister did not discuss the Fulbright Programme with President Trump at the recent G20 summit.

Q
Asked by Lord Adonis
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for International Trade
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much (1) has been paid since July 2016, and (2) is budgeted to be paid in 2017–18, to recruitment agents or companies for the recruitment of staff to (a) the Department of International Trade, and (b) the Department for Exiting the European Union.
A
Answered by: Lord Price
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Department for International Trade (DIT) has paid £1.15m to organisations for services relating to the recruitment of staff since July 2016. Recruitment costs are managed locally by the functional areas of DIT; there is no central budget for recruitment.

My noble friend a copy of the figures relating to the Department for Exiting the European Union will be placed in the library of the House once they are made available.

Q
Asked by Lord Adonis
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for International Trade
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how much (1) has been paid since July 2016, and (2) is budgeted for 2017–18, by the Department for International Trade for external legal advice
A
Answered by: Lord Price
Answered on: 27 July 2017

(1) The total amount that the Department for International Trade has spent on external legal services since the beginning of July 2016 is £135, 974.30..

(2) Department for International Trade has budgeted 1.5 million pounds in 2017/18 for external legal services that may be required.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment have they made of the benefits and costs of being an associate member of Euratom.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The nature of the UK’s future arrangements with Euratom and the EU will be subject to negotiation. Government’s aim throughout the negotiations with the European Commission will be to maintain our mutually successful civil nuclear cooperation with Euratom and the rest of the world.

Q
Asked by Lord Suri
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what level of grant-in-aid funding was provided to each service within the BBC World Service in each of the financial years 1987–88 to 2014–15; and, for each service, how much of that funding was allocated to (1) operating grants-in-aid, and (2) capital grants.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The overall information on grant-in-aid funding to the BBC World Service is available to Parliament through the Supplementary Estimates, however the information for each service is not available. The Supplementary Estimates should be available online for a large part of the period in question but the Parliamentary library should hold the information for the whole period in question.

Q
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the living conditions for gay men in Chechnya, including whether those conditions have changed for the better or worse in 2017.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2017

​We have long held concerns about the human rights situation in Chechnya, in particular the hostile environment for members of the LGBT community. We assess the situation to have deteriorated significantly in 2017, and remain deeply concerned by the continued detention, torture and murder of LGBT people. Statements attributed to the authorities in Chechnya, implying that such treatment towards LGBT people is acceptable, are particularly abhorrent and could incite further violence against LGBT persons.

Q
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of Russia regarding violence against, and the detention of, people who are perceived, or identify, as LGBT in Chechnya.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2017

Officials from our Embassy in Moscow have raised our concerns at a senior level with the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. On 28 April, the Foreign Secretary, together with his Dutch, German, French and Swedish counterparts, co-signed a letter to Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov urging the Russian Government to investigate the reports and ensure the safety of activists and journalists investigating these abuses. The UK has also taken action in a number of multilateral fora; making our concerns clear in the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Council of Europe and the UN Human Rights Council.

Q
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assistance they have offered to human rights organisations seeking to investigate cases of reported killings, detentions and torture of people who are perceived, or identify, as LGBT in Chechnya.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The UK is continuing to work closely with and provide support to the relevant non-governmental organisations that are supporting victims fleeing the persecution in Chechnya. This is in keeping with the Embassy's longstanding support for LGBT rights in Russia.

Q
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether the UK will be represented at the British Council Language and Development Conference 2017, to be held in Dakar in November; and if so, by whom.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The UK will be represented at the British Council Language and Development Conference 2017. The level of representation has not yet been determined.

Q
Asked by Lord Mawson
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what research and analysis they intend to undertake to assess the impact of, including the unintended consequences of, the implementation of Good work: the Taylor review of modern working practices, published in July, on (1) the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises, and (2), the enterprise culture in the UK.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 27 July 2017

I made an oral statement to the House on 11 July 2017 to announce the publication of the Matthew Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices. The report is comprehensive and detailed and, as Matthew Taylor himself recognises, is just the start of a long term programme. It will require detailed, careful thought and further consultation. It is important that we take action where we need to.

This Government will give the report the careful consideration it deserves and will respond in full later this year.

Asked on: 13 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they have received any representations about the content of a video published by the British Embassy in Ljubljana in February to mark 25 years of diplomatic relations between the UK and Slovenia.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Minister of State for Europe and the Americas received a letter about the video from a former chair of the British-Slovene Society. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office sent a reply on 8 June 2017.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what action they will take, and what resources they will provide, to ensure that recommendations they accept from (1) HM Chief Inspector of Prisons, and (2) the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman, are fully implemented.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 27 July 2017

We take recommendations from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and the Prison and Probation Ombudsman very seriously. We are strengthening performance management and assurance arrangements of prisons, particularly in responding to recommendations from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and the Prison and Probation Ombudsman reports. To ensure that recommendations are acted upon we are putting in place a robust system to track progress on implementation in prisons.

We have already introduced functional and geographical Group Director roles with more manageable spans of control to provide greater support for governors and empowered governors to make decisions about their prisons so they will be subject to less rigid instructions and can determine how best to spend their allocated budget. Governors will have a greater level of personal responsibility to ensure that recommendations are implemented. [Where recommendations concern safer custody, Regional Safer Custody Leads provide assurance for Prison Group Directors that appropriate action has been taken.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they are developing strategies in relation to (1) death from natural causes, (2) mental health issues, and (3) suicides for (a) prisoners in general, (b) older prisoners, and (c) prisoners on indeterminate sentences who are held beyond their initial tariff.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 27 July 2017

We are committed to improving the support that we offer to prisoners at risk of self-harm or suicide. We expect the most important and effective measures to be the investment of £100 million for recruitment of 2,500 new staff, and the introduction of new offender management arrangements in prisons under which each key worker will have particular responsibility for a small number of prisoners. These will greatly enhance the time and resources available to support prisoners who are at risk.

New training is being rolled out across the estate to support our staff to identify the risks and triggers of suicide and self-harm and understand what they can do to support prisoners at risk. The new training package consists of six sections including awareness training for staff on supporting prisoners with mental health issues.

We have put in place specialist roles (regional safer custody leads) in every region to provide advice to prisons and to spread good practice on identifying and supporting prisoners at risk. We are using experts – including providing extra funding for the Samaritans to provide targeted support for prison staff and to prisoners directly.

Other measures are being developed as part of our safety programme, which includes specific strands of work on the early days in custody; the case management of prisoners at risk; improvements to the built environment of prisons; and building hopefulness amongst prisoners, including through family and peer support.

Older Prisoners

Elderly and frail prisoners receive support from NHS clinical services and local authority social care, as well as from prison officers. All staff are trained to appropriate professional standards for their contribution to care. Supporting elderly prisoners is covered in entry-level prison officer training. Prison officers are provided with guidance on dementia and also receive advice and guidance from occupational therapists and social workers at a local level. We are working closely with clinical leaders and social care services to improve our understanding of the impacts of dementia across prisons.

We are currently working to improve our knowledge about the particular health and social needs of older prisoners so we can determine how we might meet these requirements. We have set up a working group to explore this issue. This work will include taking expert advice on what changes we might need to make to the estate or to the regime.

Indeterminate Sentence Prisoners beyond tariff

The release of prisoners serving indeterminate sentences of Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) who have completed their tariff is a matter for the independent Parole Board.

HMPPS is focused on giving IPP prisoners the support, opportunities and motivation they need to progress more quickly when they are reviewed by the Parole Board so that they have the best possible prospect for securing release. HMPPS and the Parole Board have implemented a joint action plan, the purpose of which is to deliver further improvements and efficiencies in the effort to help IPP prisoners progress towards release.

Q
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Home Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by Baroness Williams of Trafford on extremism (HLWS40), how many institutions in the UK were found, or estimated, to teach deeply conservative forms of Islam, and to provide highly socially conservative literature and preachers to UK Islamic institutions; and how many individuals in total are estimated to study at those institutions.
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Government laid a Written Ministerial Statement in Parliament on Wednesday 12 July, which conveyed the main findings of the review into the funding for Islamist extremist activity in the UK. The review has improved the Government’s understanding of the nature, scale and sources of funding for Islamist extremism in the UK.

The review’s report is classified because of the volume of personal information it contains and for national security reasons. The Written Ministerial Statement is a comprehensive and representative reflection of the review’s findings; the Government has no plans to comment further on these.

Q
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Home Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by Baroness Williams of Trafford on extremism (HLWS40), what assessment they have made of the link between (1) the distribution of the highly socially conservative literature referred to in the review, and (2) extremist activity; and what action they plan to take to prevent the publication and distribution of such material in the UK.
Answered on: 27 July 2017

The Government laid a Written Ministerial Statement in Parliament on Wednesday 12 July, which conveyed the main findings of the Government’s review into the funding for Islamist extremist activity in the UK. The review has given us the best picture we’ve ever had of how extremists operating in the UK sustain their activities. It has improved our understanding of the nature, scale and sources of funding for Islamist extremism in the UK. The review’s report is classified because of the volume of personal information it contains and for national security reasons.

No single measure will tackle all of the issues of concern raised in the review. The Government has looked carefully at the review’s findings and will build on the measures set out in the Written Ministerial Statement. The Government will also be establishing a powerful new Commission for Countering Extremism. The Commission will have an important role in supporting the Government’s efforts to defeat all forms of extremism.

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