Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
Asked by Lisa Nandy
(Wigan)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Transplant Surgery: Stem Cells
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take to ensure that all stem cell transplant patients receive adequate care and support after treatment.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Manual for Prescribed Specialised Services describes which elements of specialised services are commissioned by NHS England and which are commissioned by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs):

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/prescribed-specialised-services-manual-2.pdf

NHS England is responsible for commissioning and funding the transplant related care which takes place 30 days before transplant and continues until 100 days post-transplant. After 100 days post-transplant, commissioning responsibility for the routine follow-up of patients switches from NHS England to CCGs, as outlined in the Manual.

In the event that transplant patients experience serious complications post-transplant, elements of their care would likely continue to be planned, organised and funded by NHS England specialised commissioning. For example, if a patient requires Extracorporeal Photophersis, which is a treatment for acute and chronic graft versus host disease following transplantation, NHS England commissions this care post-transplant.

NHS England’s work in supporting the roll out of the Recovery Package for cancer patients, including those who received blood and marrow transplants, helps ensure patients have more personal care and support from the point they are diagnosed and once treatment ends. For patients this means working with their care team to develop a comprehensive plan outlining not only their physical needs, but also additional support, such as help at home or financial advice. By 2020 NHS England wants all cancer patients to have access to the Recovery Package.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
HIV Infection: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish data on the uptake of HIV medicine by drug name in (a) England, (b) each parliamentary constituency, (c) each clinical commissioning group and (d) each local authority area in the most recent year for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There were 81,240 people in England accessing the HIV medicine antiretroviral therapy in 2016. Data on people accessing HIV medicine is not available at parliamentary constituency, clinical commissioning group or local authority level.

Data on the uptake of HIV medicine by: drug name; average period of time between a diagnosis of HIV and initiation on antiretroviral therapy; number of people accessing HIV treatment by ethnicity and number of people living with HIV received treatment at each HIV clinic in England are not available in the format requested.

Grouped Questions: 106950 | 106952 | 106957 | 106953
Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
HIV Infection: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish data on the average period of time between a diagnosis of HIV and initiation on antiretroviral therapy in (a) England, (b) each parliamentary constituency, (c) each clinical commissioning group and (d) each local authority area in the most recent year for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There were 81,240 people in England accessing the HIV medicine antiretroviral therapy in 2016. Data on people accessing HIV medicine is not available at parliamentary constituency, clinical commissioning group or local authority level.

Data on the uptake of HIV medicine by: drug name; average period of time between a diagnosis of HIV and initiation on antiretroviral therapy; number of people accessing HIV treatment by ethnicity and number of people living with HIV received treatment at each HIV clinic in England are not available in the format requested.

Grouped Questions: 106950 | 106951 | 106957 | 106953
Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
HIV Infection: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people living with HIV received treatment at each HIV clinic in England in the most recent year for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There were 81,240 people in England accessing the HIV medicine antiretroviral therapy in 2016. Data on people accessing HIV medicine is not available at parliamentary constituency, clinical commissioning group or local authority level.

Data on the uptake of HIV medicine by: drug name; average period of time between a diagnosis of HIV and initiation on antiretroviral therapy; number of people accessing HIV treatment by ethnicity and number of people living with HIV received treatment at each HIV clinic in England are not available in the format requested.

Grouped Questions: 106950 | 106951 | 106952 | 106953
Q
Asked by Lisa Nandy
(Wigan)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Transplant Surgery: Stem Cells
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the suitability of current commissioning arrangements for services provided to patients after a stem cell transplant.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Manual for Prescribed Specialised Services describes which elements of specialised services are commissioned by NHS England and which are commissioned by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs):

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/prescribed-specialised-services-manual-2.pdf

NHS England is responsible for commissioning and funding the transplant related care which takes place 30 days before transplant and continues until 100 days post-transplant. After 100 days post-transplant, commissioning responsibility for the routine follow-up of patients switches from NHS England to CCGs, as outlined in the Manual.

In the event that transplant patients experience serious complications post-transplant, elements of their care would likely continue to be planned, organised and funded by NHS England specialised commissioning. For example, if a patient requires Extracorporeal Photophersis, which is a treatment for acute and chronic graft versus host disease following transplantation, NHS England commissions this care post-transplant.

There are no current plans to review the responsibilities of services commissioned by NHS England and CCGs for blood and marrow transplantation (BMT). However, NHS England will be assessing BMT in more detail over the next 18 months and will take the opportunity to further support improved pathway planning and commissioning of services that it and CCGs fund.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
HIV Infection: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish data on the number of people accessing HIV treatment by ethnicity in (a) England, (b) each parliamentary constituency, (c) each clinical commissioning group and (d) each local authority area in the most recent year for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There were 81,240 people in England accessing the HIV medicine antiretroviral therapy in 2016. Data on people accessing HIV medicine is not available at parliamentary constituency, clinical commissioning group or local authority level.

Data on the uptake of HIV medicine by: drug name; average period of time between a diagnosis of HIV and initiation on antiretroviral therapy; number of people accessing HIV treatment by ethnicity and number of people living with HIV received treatment at each HIV clinic in England are not available in the format requested.

Grouped Questions: 106950 | 106951 | 106952 | 106957
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Trade Fairs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what his policy is on journalists attending the NHS Health and Care Innovation Expo.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The NHS Health and Care Innovation Expo is organised by NHS England, who provide a number of complimentary passes. Decisions on which journalists are provided with those passes are for NHS England. The Secretary of State does not have a policy on which journalists attend the NHS Health and Care Innovation Expo.

Q
Asked by Joan Ryan
(Enfield North)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Locums: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent by the NHS on locum doctors in each local authority in London in each of the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

NHS England does not collect centralised data on the average time to fill general practitioner (GP) vacancies, which varies significantly depending on area.

Clinical commissioning groups are currently working on strategies and plans to address recruitment issues which will vary from area to area. These plans will be reflective of the General Practice Forward View and national initiatives to support recruitment and retention.

Information on spending on locum doctors is not held centrally. GPs are independent contractors who have discretion on the number and type of staff they employ in their practices to assist in the delivery of primary medical services.

Grouped Questions: 107022
Q
Asked by Joan Ryan
(Enfield North)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how long on average it has taken to fill a vacant GP post in every (a) local authority and (b) constituency in London in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

NHS England does not collect centralised data on the average time to fill general practitioner (GP) vacancies, which varies significantly depending on area.

Clinical commissioning groups are currently working on strategies and plans to address recruitment issues which will vary from area to area. These plans will be reflective of the General Practice Forward View and national initiatives to support recruitment and retention.

Information on spending on locum doctors is not held centrally. GPs are independent contractors who have discretion on the number and type of staff they employ in their practices to assist in the delivery of primary medical services.

Grouped Questions: 107021
Q
Asked by Joan Ryan
(Enfield North)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Enfield
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to increase the number of GPs in Enfield; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

NHS England, Health Education England (HEE) and the Department have been working together to increase the general practitioner (GP) workforce and support recruitment in areas where this has been identified as a challenge. The General Practice Forward View, published in April 2016, set out investment of an extra £2.4 billion a year by 2020/21 to support and grow general practice services.

At the Royal College of General Practitioners conference on 12 October 2017, my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health announced the extension of the Targeted Enhanced Recruitment Scheme which funds a £20,000 salary supplement to attract GP trainees to work in areas of the country where GP training places have been unfilled for a number of years. HEE are currently deciding the allocation of up to a further 200 training places for 2018.

In addition to the national campaigns to increase the number of GPs, Enfield Clinical Commissioning Group is undertaking specific work to increase GP numbers within their area by working with NHS London and North Central London recruitment initiatives and continuing with its well established Vocational Training Scheme to train GPs locally and retain them in local practices.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Ambulance Services: Public Sector
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of ambulances is currently provided by the public sector.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

Grouped Questions: 107073 | 107074
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Foreign Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect on (a) health inequalities and (b) public health and prevention of introducing charges to non-UK citizens using the NHS.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

All National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts in England already have a statutory responsibility to make and recover charges from patients who are not ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom and are chargeable for their healthcare.

Following a detailed public consultation that ran from December 2015 to March 2016, the Government set out in its response to that consultation in February 2017 that it intended to amend the existing Charging Regulations, alongside a published impact assessment. Over the course of the consultation and decision-making process the Government carefully considered the impact the changes may have on public health, health inequalities and on vulnerable groups, which included children and individuals in receipt of maternity services. The Secretary of State has a continuing duty to consider the impact of policies on equality issues and so this will remain under review.

The amendment regulations maintain the existing exemptions in place for the purposes of protecting the public’s health and do not change our position of ensuring that the most vulnerable have access to free healthcare. This includes children looked after by a local authority.

The requirement for upfront charging will not apply in the case of treatment that clinicians consider immediately necessary, or otherwise urgent (such that it cannot wait until the overseas visitor can reasonably be expected to return home). This means that chargeable overseas visitors will never have immediately necessary treatment, or urgent treatment withheld or delayed pending payment. All maternity services continue to be considered urgent or immediately necessary and so will never be denied.

Grouped Questions: 107072 | 107069
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make an assessment of the effect of extending NHS charges to community services on the health of vulnerable groups including pregnant women and children who are not entitled to free health care services.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

All National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts in England already have a statutory responsibility to make and recover charges from patients who are not ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom and are chargeable for their healthcare.

Following a detailed public consultation that ran from December 2015 to March 2016, the Government set out in its response to that consultation in February 2017 that it intended to amend the existing Charging Regulations, alongside a published impact assessment. Over the course of the consultation and decision-making process the Government carefully considered the impact the changes may have on public health, health inequalities and on vulnerable groups, which included children and individuals in receipt of maternity services. The Secretary of State has a continuing duty to consider the impact of policies on equality issues and so this will remain under review.

The amendment regulations maintain the existing exemptions in place for the purposes of protecting the public’s health and do not change our position of ensuring that the most vulnerable have access to free healthcare. This includes children looked after by a local authority.

The requirement for upfront charging will not apply in the case of treatment that clinicians consider immediately necessary, or otherwise urgent (such that it cannot wait until the overseas visitor can reasonably be expected to return home). This means that chargeable overseas visitors will never have immediately necessary treatment, or urgent treatment withheld or delayed pending payment. All maternity services continue to be considered urgent or immediately necessary and so will never be denied.

Grouped Questions: 107071 | 107069
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Ambulance Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many ambulances in operation across England are more than (a) two, (b) five and (c) 10 years old.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

Grouped Questions: 107047 | 107074
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Ambulance Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many ambulances were in operation across England in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

Grouped Questions: 107047 | 107073
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he expects the NHS high-risk maintenance backlog to be remedied.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department collects data on backlog maintenance (the estimated costs of eradicating all backlog maintenance to bring the estate and facilities to an appropriate standard for quality and safety) annually from National Health Service trusts through its Estates Returns Information Collection. This data is submitted by NHS providers who are responsible for assessing their own backlog maintenance and then assuring the quality of their own returns. It can be found at:

http://digital.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB30096

Local NHS organisations are responsible for managing their own estate and ensuring they provide an environment that facilitates the delivery of high quality, safe care. This includes planning and investment to tackle high risk maintenance requirements. NHS providers receive funding through the NHS national tariff payment system and from other sources which enables them to undertake capital investment in their estate and in 2016-17 NHS providers made capital investment of around £1.6 billion in their land and buildings and as well as over £800 million for plants and machinery such as generators.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Cancer: Palliative Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to improve the management of pain, including the use of fentanyl, for cancer patients.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

NHS England is committed to transforming cancer services across the country and ensuring every patient has access to the care and treatment they need. The management of pain through drugs such as fentanyl is a clinical decision and should be considered on an individual basis, in line with patients’ clinical needs and in line with guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Foreign Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish the economic impact assessment of introducing charges to non-UK citizens for using NHS services.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

All National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts in England already have a statutory responsibility to make and recover charges from patients who are not ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom and are chargeable for their healthcare.

Following a detailed public consultation that ran from December 2015 to March 2016, the Government set out in its response to that consultation in February 2017 that it intended to amend the existing Charging Regulations, alongside a published impact assessment. Over the course of the consultation and decision-making process the Government carefully considered the impact the changes may have on public health, health inequalities and on vulnerable groups, which included children and individuals in receipt of maternity services. The Secretary of State has a continuing duty to consider the impact of policies on equality issues and so this will remain under review.

The amendment regulations maintain the existing exemptions in place for the purposes of protecting the public’s health and do not change our position of ensuring that the most vulnerable have access to free healthcare. This includes children looked after by a local authority.

The requirement for upfront charging will not apply in the case of treatment that clinicians consider immediately necessary, or otherwise urgent (such that it cannot wait until the overseas visitor can reasonably be expected to return home). This means that chargeable overseas visitors will never have immediately necessary treatment, or urgent treatment withheld or delayed pending payment. All maternity services continue to be considered urgent or immediately necessary and so will never be denied.

Grouped Questions: 107071 | 107072
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Drugs: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what representations has he received from the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee on single wholesaler distribution of pharmaceutical medicines and medical supplies.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Single wholesale distribution models have been discussed with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee on several occasions and we continue the dialogue when issues are raised.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department of Health
Drugs: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment has he made of whether single wholesaler distribution of medicines and medical supplies offers value for money for patients.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department has not made such an assessment. However, the Office of Fair Trading reported in 2007 that these sorts of distribution models may have efficiency benefits and took a view that manufacturers should be free to choose the distribution method they consider to be most efficient.

Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Police Custody: Mental Illness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish data on the number of people with a mental disorder removed to police stations under Section 135 or 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 for the period between 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Home Office has collected information on the number of persons detained under section 135 and 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 since April 2015.

Data on detentions under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983, covering the 2016/17 time period, and including the number of people who were detained in a police station, will be published in the next edition of the ‘Police powers and procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. This bulletin is scheduled for release on Thursday 26th October, and will be available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

Data on the number of detentions under section 135 of the Mental Health Act 1983 will be published as ‘experimental statistics’ in the same bulletin, to acknowledge that further development work is needed on these data.

Q
(Knowsley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Police: Bureaucracy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the time and resources required to apply her Department's new annual data requirement on recording each incident and each use of force; if she will publish the impact assessment made on that requirement; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The police-led Use of Force Data Review recommended that police forces record and publish a range of data each time force is used, including the reason force was used, injury data, the gender, ethnicity and age of the subject involved, and the location and outcome of the incident.

These recommendations were welcomed by the former Home Secretary, and the former Minister for Policing and the Fire Service made a Written Ministerial Statement on 2 March 2017 announcing the implementation of the recommendations, with police forces expected to commence recording by 1 April this year.

Police forces are committed to publishing their recorded data locally, and it is a subset of this data that will be provided to the Home Office under the annual data requirement, causing no additional burden to compliant forces. This system also consolidates bureaucratic, previous forms of data collection, such as the monitoring of conducted energy device use.

Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what changes have been made to the timetable for the roll-out of the Emergency Service network since it was agreed to; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. ESN will be a more capable, more flexible and more affordable communications network than the existing Airwave mobile radio system used by the three emergency services in England, Scotland and Wales. While still delivering mission critical voice communication, it will also provide broadband data services.

The timelines for ESN are ambitious and this is because we want to give the emergency services the benefits of the latest technology as soon as practicable. However the Government is clear that public safety is our priority and the emergency services will only transition when they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

A formal arrangement has been agreed between the Programme’s sponsors (including the Home Office) of the police, fire and rescue, ambulance services of Great Britain, for how any Airwave extension costs beyond the planned National Shutdown Date (31 December 2019) should be shared between themselves.

We are working closely with our key stakeholders and suppliers on a revised plan for delivering ESN. We will have greater clarity on timescales at the end of the year.

Grouped Questions: 106830
Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions have taken place between key stakeholders in and suppliers for the roll-out of the Emergency Service Network on changes to the timetable for the implementation of that roll-out; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. ESN will be a more capable, more flexible and more affordable communications network than the existing Airwave mobile radio system used by the three emergency services in England, Scotland and Wales. While still delivering mission critical voice communication, it will also provide broadband data services.

The timelines for ESN are ambitious and this is because we want to give the emergency services the benefits of the latest technology as soon as practicable. However the Government is clear that public safety is our priority and the emergency services will only transition when they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

A formal arrangement has been agreed between the Programme’s sponsors (including the Home Office) of the police, fire and rescue, ambulance services of Great Britain, for how any Airwave extension costs beyond the planned National Shutdown Date (31 December 2019) should be shared between themselves.

We are working closely with our key stakeholders and suppliers on a revised plan for delivering ESN. We will have greater clarity on timescales at the end of the year.

Grouped Questions: 106829
Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Human Trafficking: Nationality
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people convicted of human trafficking offences were (a) UK nationals, (b) other EU nationals and (c) nationals from outside the EU in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Data relating to the number of people prosecuted and convicted for modern slavery and human trafficking offences in England and Wales can be found in the “criminal justice system outcomes by offence” data tool table contained in the annual Criminal Justice Statistics publication, linked below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2016

It is not possible to disaggregate this data by the nationality of defendants as this information is not held centrally.

Q
Asked by Ian Lavery
(Wansbeck)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Young Offenders: Criminal Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department's policy is on criminal offences of people under 18 being carried forward into adulthood.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We want to divert children from entering the criminal justice system in the first instance, with custody and other sanctions used only as a last resort. The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 primarily exists to support rehabilitation and enable the employment of reformed offenders who have stayed on the right side of the law. The current criminal records system strikes a balance between the rights of the individual and the public’s right to protection.

The government’s policy has previously been stated during submissions to the Justice Select Committee on 11th November 2016:

http://data.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/committeeevidence.svc/evidencedocument/justice-committee/disclosure-of-youth-criminal-records/written/43085.html

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how far away from residential properties are the planned new prisons at (a) Yorkshire, adjacent to HM Prison Full Sutton, (b) HM Young Offenders Institute Rochester and (c) HM Young Offenders Institute Hindley.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Prison Site

Distance (m) from centre of prison1

Rochester

330

Hindley

166

Full Sutton2

531

1 Distance from estimated centre of prison.

2 Distance taken from centre of identified agricultural field.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Wales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with Natural Resources Wales on plans to build a prison on land in the Baglan Industrial Estate.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Ministry of Justice has had a number of discussions with relevant stakeholders relating to the development of the Baglan site in Port Talbot. Specifically, consultants, on behalf of the department, have been in contact with Natural Resource Wales to confirm the re-classification of the Baglan site from a C2 to a C1 classified site.

(A C2 classified zone is described as areas of the floodplain without significant flood defence infrastructure. A C1 classified zone is described as areas of the floodplain which are developed and served by significant infrastructure, including flood defences.)

Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Anti-slavery Task Force
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings of the anti-slavery task force there have been since that task force was established; and if she will make a statement.
A
Corrected answer by: Sarah Newton
Corrected on: 18 October 2017
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 18 October 2017.
The correct answer should have been:

Data on the number of correspondence to the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI), which was responded to within 20 days is published quarterly as part of UKVI transparency data.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-august-2017

UKVI does not publish data in the 10 day and 30 day format requested.

The Prime Minister has held a number of meetings on modern slavery, including with the Task Force, to bring the collective weight of Government to bear against this terrible crime.

A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Data on the number of correspondence to the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI), which was responded to within 20 days is published quarterly as part of UKVI transparency data.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-august-2017

UKVI does not publish data in the 10 day and 30 day format requested.

The Prime Minister has held a number of meetings on modern slavery, including with the Task Force, to bring the collective weight of Government to bear against this terrible crime.

Q
Asked by Frank Field
(Birkenhead)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's estimate is of the amount of EU legislation and regulation that can be incorporated into UK law without amendment.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill will convert European Union law into UK law as it applies in the UK at the moment of exit. This will ensure that, wherever possible, the same rules and laws will apply the day after exit as they did before.

The Government is still making a detailed assessment of what corrections will be required to make that law function appropriately on exit day. The Department for Exiting the European Union are working closely with departments across Government to ensure we make the changes required to deliver a functioning statute book on exit in the most efficient manner possible.

Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Exports: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the (a) value and (b) proportion of manufactured (i) goods and (ii) services exported to other EU countries was by each nation and region of the UK in each of the last three years.
A
Corrected answer by: Mark Garnier
Corrected on: 18 October 2017
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 18 October 2017.
The correct answer should have been:

The information asked for is available from the sources listed below. Data is made available by value (£, current prices, not constant prices) of which proportions can be calculated.

i) Data on the value of UK goods exports to EU countries are available from the ‘Build Your Own Tables’ tool in HMRC’s Overseas Trade Statistics database. Manufacturing goods are defined as Standard Industrial Trade Classification (SITC) codes 5-8. https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/BuildYourOwnTables/Pages/Table.aspx

ii) Data on the value of UK services exports to selected EU countries and the EU as a bloc, by type of service, are available from the ONS Pink Book 2014, 2015 and 2016 publications

https://www.ons.gov.uk/file?uri=/economy/nationalaccounts/balanceofpayments/adhocs/006656balanceofpaymentsannualgeographicaldatatables/2015updateddetailedgeographictradedata.xls (Table 9 - Data for 2015)

https://www.ons.gov.uk/file?uri=/economy/nationalaccounts/balanceofpayments/datasets/9geographicalbreakdownofthecurrentaccountthepinkbook2016/thepinkbook/pinkbook2016chapter9.xls (Table 9.10 - Data for 2014)

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20160106022154/http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/bop/united-kingdom-balance-of-payments/2015/rft-chapter-09.xls (Table 9.10 - Data for 2013)

iii) Data on the value of goods exports from Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the English regions to EU countries are available from the ‘Build Your Own Tables’ tool in HMRC’s Regional Trade Statistics database. Manufacturing goods are defined as Standard Industrial Trade Classification (SITC) codes 5-8 https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/BuildYourOwnTables/Pages/Table.aspx

iv) Data on the value of services exports from Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the English regions to EU countries, by type of service, are available from the ONS’s International Trade in Services (ITIS) experimental statistics release. This covers all services sectors, except banking, travel and transport: https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/internationaltrade/articles/estimatingthevalueofserviceexportsabroadfromdifferentpartsoftheuk/2015 For previous years’ data please see the following: https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/internationaltrade/articles/estimatingthevalueofserviceexportsabroadfromdifferentpartsoftheuk/2011to2015

Note: HMRC and ONS data are not directly comparable, as HMRC trade in goods data are calculated on the basis of goods crossing the customs border, whereas ONS trade in services data are based on a change in ownership.

A
Answered by: Mark Garnier
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The information asked for is available from the sources listed below. Data is made available by value (£, current prices, not constant prices) of which proportions can be calculated.

i) Data on the value of UK goods exports to EU countries are available from the ‘Build Your Own Tables’ tool in HMRC’s Overseas Trade Statistics database. Manufacturing goods are defined as Standard Industrial Trade Classification (SITC) codes 5-8. https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/BuildYourOwnTables/Pages/Table.aspx

ii) Data on the value of UK services exports to selected EU countries and the EU as a bloc, by type of service, are available from the ONS Pink Book 2014, 2015 and 2016 publications

https://www.ons.gov.uk/file?uri=/economy/nationalaccounts/balanceofpayments/adhocs/006656balanceofpaymentsannualgeographicaldatatables/2015updateddetailedgeographictradedata.xls (Table 9 - Data for 2015)

https://www.ons.gov.uk/file?uri=/economy/nationalaccounts/balanceofpayments/datasets/9geographicalbreakdownofthecurrentaccountthepinkbook2016/thepinkbook/pinkbook2016chapter9.xls (Table 9.10 - Data for 2014)

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20160106022154/http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/bop/united-kingdom-balance-of-payments/2015/rft-chapter-09.xls (Table 9.10 - Data for 2013)

iii) Data on the value of goods exports from Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the English regions to EU countries are available from the ‘Build Your Own Tables’ tool in HMRC’s Regional Trade Statistics database. Manufacturing goods are defined as Standard Industrial Trade Classification (SITC) codes 5-8 https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/BuildYourOwnTables/Pages/Table.aspx

iv) Data on the value of services exports from Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the English regions to EU countries, by type of service, are available from the ONS’s International Trade in Services (ITIS) experimental statistics release. This covers all services sectors, except banking, travel and transport: https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/internationaltrade/articles/estimatingthevalueofserviceexportsabroadfromdifferentpartsoftheuk/2015 For previous years’ data please see the following: https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/internationaltrade/articles/estimatingthevalueofserviceexportsabroadfromdifferentpartsoftheuk/2011to2015

Note: HMRC and ONS data are not directly comparable, as HMRC trade in goods data are calculated on the basis of goods crossing the customs border, whereas ONS trade in services data are based on a change in ownership.

Q
Asked by Andrew Selous
(South West Bedfordshire)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Government Car Service: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has given guidance to drivers in the Government Car Services on Westminster City Councils' initiative Don't Be Idle.
A
Answered by: Mr John Hayes
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Government Car Service drivers are given a clear instruction not to keep engines running whilst parked or stationary and regular reminders are sent out on this subject. This instruction would also cover the aims of Westminster City Councils’ initiative on cars idling, which the drivers have been made aware of.

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Railways: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which new rail schemes to be jointly funded between Network Rail and the private sector his Department has assessed and analysed in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We continue to explore all opportunities for private sector funding, including in rail schemes such as East West Rail and Crossrail 2.

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Railways: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many new projects or schemes Network Rail has agreed to in the last 12 months which are to be jointly funded with the private sector; and which those projects or schemes are.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We continue to explore all opportunities for private sector funding, including in rail schemes such as East West Rail and Crossrail 2.

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
Railways
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when his Department plans to publish the report it commissioned from First Class Partnerships on the commissioning of new rail services; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department is not aware of any report commissioned from First Class Partnerships on this issue.

Q
(Bedford)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Transport
East Midlands Rail Franchise
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the equalities impact assessment carried out for the East Midlands Rail Franchise; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 18 October 2017

I am currently not in a position to publish the equalities impact assessment. The equalities impact assessment will be considered alongside the development of the Invitation to Tender. As the public consultation closed on 11 October 2017, and the responses are being analysed, an equality impact assessment cannot be completed at this stage. I will be considering the equality impact assessment in due course once it has been prepared.

Q
Asked by Frank Field
(Birkenhead)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Women and Equalities
Government Equalities Office: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what the Government Equalities Office's estimate is of the amount of EU legislation and regulation that can be incorporated into UK law without amendment.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Government Equalities Office (GEO) has overall responsibility for the Civil Partnership Act 2004, the Equality Act 2006, the Equality Act 2010 and the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) 2013.

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill will convert European Union law into UK law as it applies in the UK at the moment of exit. This will ensure that, wherever possible, the same rules and laws will apply the day after exit as they did before.

The Government is still making a detailed assessment of what corrections will be required to make that law function appropriately on exit day. The Department for Exiting the European Union are working closely with departments across Government, including GEO, to ensure we make the changes required to deliver a functioning statute book on exit in the most efficient manner possible.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he has any plans to review the personal independence payments assessment criteria.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There are no current plans to review the Personal Independence Payment assessment criteria.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Appeals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing an assessment rate for personal independence payments during the appeals process.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

No assessment or costings exercise has been made in relation to introducing an assessment rate for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) during the appeal process. As for other decisions in law, a PIP decision persists until such time as an appeal against the decision is concluded. As PIP can be paid at one of eight different rates this means that those appealing against a successful award continue to be paid the level of PIP awarded by the Secretary of State during the appeal process.

Grouped Questions: 107038
Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the (a) quality and (b) consistency in the delivery of personal independence payment assessments across the UK in each of the last five years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department has set standards for the quality of assessments which both Personal Independence Payment providers must meet, which the Department monitors. The standards require assessment providers to provide the Department’s Decision Makers with an assessment that is clear and medically reasonable.

We are continually working with the assessment providers to further improve the quality of assessments including clinical coaching, feedback and support available to each assessor.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Appeals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much has been spent defending appeals of personal independence payment decisions in (a) the UK, (b) Wales and (c) Aberavon in each of the last five years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The information is not readily available and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the psychological effect that the personal independence payment assessment process is having on applicants.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We have consulted and engaged widely, and continue to do so, with disabled people, carers and representative organisations to ensure the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment process works smoothly and efficiently for all claimants, regardless of their condition or disability. The PIP assessment allows us to accurately and consistently assess individuals’ needs, ensuring that support is targeted at those disabled people who require the most assistance to lead independent lives.

We do recognise that attending a face-to-face assessment can be a stressful experience for some people, which is why we do not carry out such consultations where there is enough existing evidence to carry out a paper-based assessment. Furthermore, where a face-to-face consultation is required, we encourage claimants to bring another person with them to consultations where they would find this helpful to, for example, reassure them or to help them during the consultation. The person chosen is at the discretion of the claimant and might be, but is not limited to, a parent, family member, friend, carer, or advocate.

Where a face-to-face consultation is required, the Health Professional (HP) carrying it out will be a medically qualified professional and as such, will have the appropriate skills to enable them to deal with people in a supportive and sensitive way. HPs ensure that assessments are relaxed and unhurried, allowing the claimant time and encouraging them to explain in their own words how their health condition or disability impacts their ability to carry out the PIP activities. It is important that the consultation feels like a genuine two way conversation.

In 2016 DWP commissioned Ipsos MORI to conduct independent research with PIP claimants covering all aspects of the PIP journey, from initial claim, the assessment process through to mandatory reconsideration and appeal. The first phase of the research, examining the initial claims process, was published in the Department’s research report series in March. Subsequent findings from stages two and three of the research, including findings on assessments, will be published in late 2017/early 2018 (date to be confirmed).

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the usefulness of the information provided to personal independence payment claimants on obtaining supporting evidence for their claims.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We currently send an information booklet to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claimants, which tells them about the types of supporting evidence it is helpful to provide with a claim, when we send the ‘How your disability affects you’ questionnaire for completion.

However, we constantly look to review and improve the experience of people claiming PIP. We are currently considering the recommendations made in the second independent review of PIP (published on 30 March 2017) which included recommendations to improve our information regarding the provision of supporting evidence. We plan to respond to the review’s findings later this year.

Q
Asked by Chris Evans
(Islwyn)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he expects the next version of the personal independence payment assessment guide for assessment providers to be published.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Personal Independence Payment Assessment Guide the Department’s guidance for Health Professionals is regularly updated. The next update is scheduled for this Autumn.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Complaints
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints were upheld in relation to the personal independence payment assessment process in (a) the UK, (b) Wales and (c) Aberavon in each of the last two years.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The number of complaints upheld in relation to the PIP assessment process in the last is as follows:

Operational Year 15/16 (April 15 to March 2016)

a) In the UK, 133 complaints were closed in relation to the PIP assessment process, of which 67 were upheld

b) In Wales, 4 complaints were closed in relation to the PIP assessment process, of which 2 were upheld

c) The DWP complaints system does not collect information at this level of detail

Operational Year 16/17 (April 2016 to March 2017)

a) In the UK, 1345 complaints were closed in relation to the PIP assessment process, of which 545 were upheld

b) In Wales, 506 complaints were closed in relation to the PIP assessment process, of which 206 were upheld

c) The DWP complaints system does not collect information at this level of detail

Data provided for complaints closed and upheld within the 2015/216 and 2016/2017 operational years.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Appeals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he has undertaken a costings exercise on introducing an assessment rate for personal independence payments claimants during the appeals process.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

No assessment or costings exercise has been made in relation to introducing an assessment rate for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) during the appeal process. As for other decisions in law, a PIP decision persists until such time as an appeal against the decision is concluded. As PIP can be paid at one of eight different rates this means that those appealing against a successful award continue to be paid the level of PIP awarded by the Secretary of State during the appeal process.

Grouped Questions: 107037
Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Complaints
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints were received in relation to the personal independence payment assessment process in (a) the UK, (b) Wales and (c) Aberavon in each of the last two years.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The total number of complaints received in relation to the PIP assessment process in each of the last two operational years is as follows:

Operational Year 15/16 (April 15 to March 2016)

a) In the UK a total of 142 complaints were logged against the PIP assessment process

b) In Wales a total of 4 complaints were logged against PIP assessment process

c) The DWP complaints system does not collect information at this level of detail.

Operational Year 16/17 (April 2016 to March 2017)

a) In the UK a total of 1391 complaints were logged against the PIP assessment process

b) In Wales a total of 519 complaints were logged against the PIP assessment process

c) The DWP complaints system does not collect information at this level of detail.

Data provided for complaints received within the 2015/216 and 2016/2017 operational years.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many PIP2 forms were (a) completed and returned within the four week deadline, (b) completed and returned outside the four week deadline and (c) never returned in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

473,000 claimants under Normal Rules returned their PIP2 questionnaire within 28 days and 350,000 claimants returned their questionnaire outside 28 days. A further 129,000 claimants were not recorded as having returned a PIP2 questionnaire. The status of claims as 'Normal Rules' is shown as at the point of the registration. It is possible for claims to transition between Normal/Special Rules during the course of the claimant journey. Special Rules for the Terminally Ill claimants are not required to complete PIP2 questionnaires.

It should be noted that a PIP claimant is given one calendar month from the day after the date of issue to return the PIP2 questionnaire. Claimants who require additional time to complete and submit their PIP2 questionnaire are able to do so where that is reasonably required. The letter accompanying the PIP2 encourages claimants to contact the Department if they require more time.

Notes:

  1. Normal Rules only. Special Rules for the Terminally Ill claimants are not required to complete PIP2 questionnaires.
  2. The status of claims as 'normal rules' is shown as at the point of the registration. It is possible for claims to transition between normal/special rules and new claims/reassessments during the course of the claimant journey.
  3. The 'Issue of Part 2 to return of Part 2' clearance time is measured as the time between the date the Part 2 form is sent to the claimant and the date the form is received back by the Department as recorded on Department systems.
  4. Unpublished data which may be subject to revision and should be used with caution.
  5. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 1,000.
  6. Totals may not sum due to rounding.
  7. Great Britain only.
Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of people with conditions that do not require face-to-face assessments for a personal independence payment application but are still being invited for one in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Decisions on whether an assessment can be undertaken based on the paper evidence alone, or via a face to face consultation, are made by a Healthcare Professional on a case by case basis and are not dependent on a claimant’s condition, except for those people who are applying under the terminally ill provisions. Most people will be required to attend a face to face consultation except where there is sufficient existing information to carry out an assessment based on the paper evidence.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he plans to commission a review of the evidence-gathering process for personal independence payments.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We constantly look to review and improve the experience of claiming Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and committed to two, statutory independent reviews as part of the Welfare Reform Act 2012. The latest of these reviews, led by Paul Gray, was published on 30 March 2017: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/personal-independence-payment-pip-assessment-second-independent-review

As part of the review Paul Gray considered how effectively further evidence is being used to assist the correct claim decision, and the speed and effectiveness of information-gathering.

We are currently considering the review’s findings and plan to respond later this year.

In 2016 DWP commissioned Ipsos MORI to conduct independent research with PIP claimants covering all aspects of the PIP journey, from initial claim, the assessment process through to mandatory reconsideration and appeal. The first phase of the research, examining the initial claims process, was published in the Department’s research report series in March 2017. Subsequent findings from stages two and three of the research, including findings on assessments and decisions, will be published in late 2017/early 2018 (date to be confirmed).

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the usefulness of the PIP2 form in collecting information about a claimant's conditions.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The PIP2 questionnaire was designed to allow claimants to tell us, in their own words, how their health condition or disability impacts them on a day-to-day basis. The questionnaire has a mixture of tick boxes and free text boxes allowing claimants to add as much or as little detail as they wish.

Recent research[1] carried out by Ipsos MORI found that 85 per cent of claimants were able to complete all sections of the questionnaire and only four per cent were unable to do so. The research also shows that 63 per cent of claimants found completing the questionnaire as easy or easier than expected.

However, we constantly look to review and improve the experience of people claiming Personal Independence Payment (PIP). We are currently considering the recommendations made in the second independent review of Personal Independence Payment (published on 30 March 2017) which included recommendations to improve our communications for claimants. We plan to respond to the review’s findings later this year.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/personal-independence-payment-evaluation-wave-1-claimant-survey-findings

Q
Asked by Neil Gray
(Airdrie and Shotts)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Access to Work Programme
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to promote Access to Work.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Although our approach has primarily been to work with Remploy and other partners and charities, using their effective networks and channels to reach potential recipients, we have also incurred some expenditure in marketing the scheme and the figures are set out below. We have also worked extensively to promote the Access to Work Scheme via Disability confident with stakeholders and partners such as the impairment specific charities and health practitioners.

Promotion of the Access to Work Scheme

Year

Spend

2014/15

£0

2015/16

£3,960

2016/17

£9,639

The most recent published statistics show that the number of people who had any Access to Work provision approved in 2016/17 increased by nearly 8% from 2015/16.

Access to work remains a demand led programme but the figures relating to the overall Access to Work spend are set out in the additional table below.

Spend on the Access to Work Scheme

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total Access to Work programme spend

£97.0m

£96m

£104m

Associated admin costs

£8m

£7.0m

£8m

Grand total

£105m

£103m

£112m

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest £m.

Our most recent official experimental statistics that providea breakdown of different disabilities and conditions for the number of people who had Access to Work provision approved can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics.

Finally, the information relating to how many applications were made and successful in England, Scotland and Wales in the last five years is not readily available and has not previously been published as official statistics.

Grouped Questions: 106844 | 106845 | 106843
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Jobcentres: Sheffield
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment has been made of the costs of relocation and refurbishment at Cavendish Court Jobcentre as part of the current jobcentre closure programme.
A
Answered by: Damian Hinds
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We are not in a position to share figures due to commercial confidentiality pending completion of legal processes. We expect to make savings by merging offices through reduced running costs and making best use of both office space available and taxpayer’s money.

Q
Asked by Neil Gray
(Airdrie and Shotts)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Access to Work Programme: Expenditure
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much his Department has spent on (a) the Access to Work scheme and (b) promoting that scheme in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Although our approach has primarily been to work with Remploy and other partners and charities, using their effective networks and channels to reach potential recipients, we have also incurred some expenditure in marketing the scheme and the figures are set out below. We have also worked extensively to promote the Access to Work Scheme via Disability confident with stakeholders and partners such as the impairment specific charities and health practitioners.

Promotion of the Access to Work Scheme

Year

Spend

2014/15

£0

2015/16

£3,960

2016/17

£9,639

The most recent published statistics show that the number of people who had any Access to Work provision approved in 2016/17 increased by nearly 8% from 2015/16.

Access to work remains a demand led programme but the figures relating to the overall Access to Work spend are set out in the additional table below.

Spend on the Access to Work Scheme

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total Access to Work programme spend

£97.0m

£96m

£104m

Associated admin costs

£8m

£7.0m

£8m

Grand total

£105m

£103m

£112m

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest £m.

Our most recent official experimental statistics that providea breakdown of different disabilities and conditions for the number of people who had Access to Work provision approved can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics.

Finally, the information relating to how many applications were made and successful in England, Scotland and Wales in the last five years is not readily available and has not previously been published as official statistics.

Grouped Questions: 106839 | 106845 | 106843
Q
Asked by Neil Gray
(Airdrie and Shotts)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Access to Work Programme: Applications
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many applications were (a) made to the Access to Work scheme and (b) how many of those applications were successful in (i) England, (ii) Scotland and (iii) Wales in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Although our approach has primarily been to work with Remploy and other partners and charities, using their effective networks and channels to reach potential recipients, we have also incurred some expenditure in marketing the scheme and the figures are set out below. We have also worked extensively to promote the Access to Work Scheme via Disability confident with stakeholders and partners such as the impairment specific charities and health practitioners.

Promotion of the Access to Work Scheme

Year

Spend

2014/15

£0

2015/16

£3,960

2016/17

£9,639

The most recent published statistics show that the number of people who had any Access to Work provision approved in 2016/17 increased by nearly 8% from 2015/16.

Access to work remains a demand led programme but the figures relating to the overall Access to Work spend are set out in the additional table below.

Spend on the Access to Work Scheme

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total Access to Work programme spend

£97.0m

£96m

£104m

Associated admin costs

£8m

£7.0m

£8m

Grand total

£105m

£103m

£112m

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest £m.

Our most recent official experimental statistics that providea breakdown of different disabilities and conditions for the number of people who had Access to Work provision approved can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics.

Finally, the information relating to how many applications were made and successful in England, Scotland and Wales in the last five years is not readily available and has not previously been published as official statistics.

Grouped Questions: 106839 | 106844 | 106843
Q
Asked by Neil Gray
(Airdrie and Shotts)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Access to Work Programme
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the most recent breakdown is of different disabilities and conditions for those who receive Access to Work assistance.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Although our approach has primarily been to work with Remploy and other partners and charities, using their effective networks and channels to reach potential recipients, we have also incurred some expenditure in marketing the scheme and the figures are set out below. We have also worked extensively to promote the Access to Work Scheme via Disability confident with stakeholders and partners such as the impairment specific charities and health practitioners.

Promotion of the Access to Work Scheme

Year

Spend

2014/15

£0

2015/16

£3,960

2016/17

£9,639

The most recent published statistics show that the number of people who had any Access to Work provision approved in 2016/17 increased by nearly 8% from 2015/16.

Access to work remains a demand led programme but the figures relating to the overall Access to Work spend are set out in the additional table below.

Spend on the Access to Work Scheme

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total Access to Work programme spend

£97.0m

£96m

£104m

Associated admin costs

£8m

£7.0m

£8m

Grand total

£105m

£103m

£112m

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest £m.

Our most recent official experimental statistics that providea breakdown of different disabilities and conditions for the number of people who had Access to Work provision approved can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics.

Finally, the information relating to how many applications were made and successful in England, Scotland and Wales in the last five years is not readily available and has not previously been published as official statistics.

Grouped Questions: 106839 | 106844 | 106845
Q
Asked by Neil Gray
(Airdrie and Shotts)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Disability
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to increase the number of disabled people in work; and whether his Department is planning to set targets.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Government is committed to improving employment outcomes for disabled people. The manifesto commitment underpins this with a clear and time-bound goal to see 1 million more disabled people into work over the next 10 years.

Since quarter 1 2016, the number of working aged disabled people in employment has increased by over 170,000 to 3.5 million in quarter 1 2017. The disability employment rate has increased by over 2 percentage points and now stands at 49 per cent.

We know that there is much more that needs to be done, so that everyone who can work is given the right support and opportunities to do so. This Autumn we intend to set out our next steps following last year’s Improving Lives: Work, Health and Disability Green Paper and the consultation that followed this.

Q
Asked by Frank Field
(Birkenhead)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's estimate is of the amount of EU legislation and regulation that can be incorporated into UK law without amendment.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill will convert European Union law into UK law as it applies in the UK at the moment of exit. This will ensure that, wherever possible, the same rules and laws will apply the day after exit as they did before.

The Government is still making a detailed assessment of what corrections will be required to make that law function appropriately on exit day. The Department for Exiting the European Union are working closely with departments across Government to ensure we make the changes required to deliver a functioning statute book on exit in the most efficient manner possible.

Q
Asked by Frank Field
(Birkenhead)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what his Department's estimate is of the amount of EU legislation and regulation that can be incorporated into UK law without amendment.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill will convert European Union law into UK law as it applies in the UK at the moment of exit. This will ensure that, wherever possible, the same rules and laws will apply the day after exit as they did before.

The Government is still making a detailed assessment of what corrections will be required to make that law function appropriately on exit day. The Department for International Trade, alongside other departments across government, is working closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union to ensure we make the changes required to deliver a functioning statute book on exit in the most efficient manner possible.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Foreign Nationals
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which the changes brought in by National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 may exacerbate health inequalities; whether they have made any further estimate of the savings to be made since publishing their impact assessment; if so, what is the difference between those two estimates; and whether they plan to reconsider those changes.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Following a detailed public consultation that ran from December 2015 to March 2016, the Government set out in its response to that consultation in February 2017 that it intended to amend the existing Charging Regulations. Over the course of the consultation and decision-making process, the Government carefully considered the impact the changes may have on public health, health inequalities and on vulnerable groups. The regulations providing for these changes were introduced on 19 July 2017 alongside a published impact assessment which estimated that the net income per annum as a result of the new regulations would be up to £40 million per year. While the Government monitors the implementation of the regulations and their effects, no further estimates on the net income have been made since the publication of the impact assessment.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many meetings they have held with the Chief Executives of Atos and Capita about Personal Independence Payment assessments since the General Election.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Her Majesty’s Government has had no meetings with the Chief Executives of either Independent Assessment Services (Atos) or Capita since the last General Election.

Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of people have received fixed penalty notices for failing to register on the electoral register in each local authority area since June 2014.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Cabinet Office does not hold any information about the number of fixed penalty
notices issued relating to electoral registration. The issuing of fixed penalty notices is at
the discretion of individual Electoral Registration Officers, without the involvement of
central Government.

Q
(Tottenham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
HM Treasury
Employment
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of supply chain jobs in the UK supported by (a) High Speed 2, (b) Heathrow expansion, (c) Hinkley Point nuclear power station and (d) Crossrail 2.
A
Answered by: Elizabeth Truss
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The contracts announced in July for Phase One of High Speed 2 will support 16,000 jobs in Britain and will create opportunities for thousands of SMEs. In total, construction of the full HS2 route to the north-west and Yorkshire will create up to 25,000 jobs and 2,000 apprenticeships. Another 3,000 people will operate HS2 and it is estimated that growth around new HS2 stations will create another 100,000 jobs.

With regard to Heathrow airport, the final report of the Airports Commission stated that “expansion could generate 59-77,000 additional direct, indirect and induced jobs.”

HM Treasury has made no recent estimate of the number of supply chain jobs in the UK supported by Hinkley Point C nuclear power station or the Crossrail 2 proposal. Such estimates are often undertaken by schemes’ promoters.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Education
Children: Day Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the accessibility for children with special educational needs and disability of 30 hours free childcare places.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We believe that every eligible child, regardless of their need or disability, should be able to access the 30 hours. The early implementation of 30 hours showed that local areas that had put in place measures to support the participation of special educational needs and disability (SEND) children were successful in delivering extended places to children with additional needs, including those with very complex needs.

We have put in place a range of measures to support local areas. Our National Funding Formula includes an additional needs factor which directs more funding to local authorities with more need. And our new Disability Access Fund, worth £615 per child, and the requirement that local authorities establish a SEN Inclusion Fund, will help to ensure children with SEND can access and get the best from the 30 hours. The department has also awarded grants to support children with SEND to five Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, worth over £1.5 million, and Childcare Works, our 30 hours’ delivery contractor, hosted events in July and September focused on supporting local authorities and providers to implement the 30 hour offer for children with SEND.

Q
Asked by Leo Docherty
(Aldershot)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Sports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to increase participation in sport by school children.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Through the primary PE and sport premium, the government has invested over £600m of ring-fenced funding to primary schools to improve PE and sport since 2013. The government has doubled the premium from September 2017 using revenue from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy.

£100m from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy will be used for the Healthy Pupils Capital Fund. The funding is for one year only (2018-19). It is intended to facilitate an improvement in children’s physical and mental health by increasing and improving access to and use of relevant facilities, such as kitchens, dining facilities, changing rooms and sports facilities.

The new PE curriculum is designed to ensure that all pupils develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities, are physically active for sustained periods of time and lead healthy and active lives.

The department also funds targeted grants to support the delivery of the School Games and helps schools to ensure PE and sport is inclusive.

Q
Asked by Jon Trickett
(Hemsworth)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Education
Department for Education: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 October 2017 to Question 10448, on Department for Education: procurement, to which organisation that civil servant was seconded; and for how long that secondment was for.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The staff member referred to in the answer to Question 10448 was employed by the department through the Government Procurement Graduate Scheme. As part of that scheme, trainees spent six months on secondment to either a private or voluntary sector organisation. Secondments were arranged by the scheme organisers. The department trainee was seconded to Vodafone for a period of 6 months.

Q
(Berwick-upon-Tweed)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Birds: Conservation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 11 of the RSPB's Reserves 2012 report, what information his Department holds on the population of priority bird species on RSPB reserves since 2012.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Defra does not hold information on the population of priority bird species on RSPB reserves.

Q
Asked by Chris Law
(Dundee West)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Pneumonia
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to tackle preventable child deaths from pneumonia in support of progress towards Sustainable Development Goals.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The UK is the largest donor to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, which delivers the pneumococcal vaccine to developing countries to protect against the main cause of pneumonia. Between 2010 and 2016, 109 million children received the vaccine with Gavi support, saving an estimated 762,000 lives.

As part of the UK’s commitment to achieving the Global Goals, DfID supports countries to build stronger health systems that can respond to both the existing disease burden and emerging health needs.

Q
Asked by David Linden
(Glasgow East)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Saudi Arabia: Capital Punishment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations his Department has received on the number of cases in Saudi Arabia where torture has been alleged to have been used by authorities to extract a confession from a person who has subsequently been sentenced to death and is currently on death row.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is aware of media reports about the use of torture by the Saudi Arabian authorities to extract confessions from persons who have subsequently been sentenced to death, or who are currently on death row; but has received no representations from confirmed cases. The British Government condemns torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, and it is a priority for us to combat it wherever and whenever it occurs.

Q
Asked by Scott Mann
(North Cornwall)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to assist the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust since it has been placed into special measures.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

This is a matter for NHS Improvement. Special Measures for Quality is a targeted and time-limited regime agreed between the Care Quality Commission and NHS Improvement.

We have been advised by NHS Improvement that a range of support has already been provided to Royal Cornwall Hospitals National Health Service Trust, including an Improvement Director to support the Trust in the development of an overarching improvement plan; buddying arrangements with the Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust and Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust to provide peer executive support and improvement expertise; as well as a range of other clinical improvement activities. There is national dedicated funding available to any trust that is placed in Special Measures for Quality. Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust will have full access to this resource to support improvement activities.

Q
Asked by Jo Platt
(Leigh)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
NHS: Crimes of Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what information (a) his Department, (b) NHS England and (c) arms-length bodies collect on the number of reported physical assaults on NHS staff.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The NHS Staff Survey is used by the Department, NHS England and arm’s-length bodies to collect information on the percentage of staff experiencing physical violence from patients, relatives or the public in the last 12 months, the percentage of staff experiencing physical violence from staff in the last 12 months and the percentage of staff/colleagues reporting their most recent experience of violence.

Working with their security staff, the Police and Crown Prosecution Service, employers are responsible for reducing the likelihood of staff being attacked and taking appropriate action against those assaulting their staff. Trusts can use the NHS Staff Survey to benchmark progress against their peers and help them review their plans for tackling violence against their staff.

In 2016 (the latest NHS Staff Survey data available), 15% of staff reported they experienced physical violence from patients, relatives or members of the public in the last 12 months, a proportion which has remained static since 2012. In contrast, nearly all staff who participated in the survey reported that they have never experienced violence from a colleague (98%) or their manager (99%) in the last 12 months.

From 2012 - 2016, the NHS Staff Survey has shown:

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Percentage of staff experiencing physical violence from patients, relatives or the public in the last 12 months

14.9%

14.9%

14.6%

14.8%

14.9%

Percentage of staff experiencing physical violence from staff in the last 12 months

2.7%

2.7%

2.7%

2.0%

2.0%

Of those experiencing physical violence, the percentage of them or their colleagues reporting the incident has remained broadly similar since 2012

73.8%

72.6%

72.3%

71.6%

72.0%

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Surgery: Waiting Lists
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what his policy is on the minimum waiting time for elective surgery; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The NHS Constitution outlines that patients have a right to start consultant-led treatment within a maximum of 18 weeks from referral for non-urgent conditions. If this is not possible, the National Health Service must take all reasonable steps to offer a suitable alternative provider that can treat them sooner, if this is clinically appropriate and it is what the patient wants.

Clinical priority is the main determinant of when patients should be treated followed by the chronological order of when they were added to the list. Clinicians should make decisions about patients’ treatment and patients should not experience undue delay at any stage of their referral, diagnosis or treatment.

It is for NHS commissioners and providers locally to work together to manage demand and plan sufficient capacity to maintain low waiting times.

Grouped Questions: 107231
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Surgery: Waiting Lists
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what his Department's policy is on clinical commissioning groups introducing minimum waiting times for elective surgery.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The NHS Constitution outlines that patients have a right to start consultant-led treatment within a maximum of 18 weeks from referral for non-urgent conditions. If this is not possible, the National Health Service must take all reasonable steps to offer a suitable alternative provider that can treat them sooner, if this is clinically appropriate and it is what the patient wants.

Clinical priority is the main determinant of when patients should be treated followed by the chronological order of when they were added to the list. Clinicians should make decisions about patients’ treatment and patients should not experience undue delay at any stage of their referral, diagnosis or treatment.

It is for NHS commissioners and providers locally to work together to manage demand and plan sufficient capacity to maintain low waiting times.

Grouped Questions: 107228
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Doctors
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU on the regulation, movement and education of doctors in the UK.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department is working closely with the General Medical Council, Health Education England, NHS England and others in the health and care system to understand the impact of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union on doctors in the UK.

Q
(Dumfries and Galloway)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Human Trafficking: Cairnryan Port
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been trafficked into the UK through the Port of Cairnryan in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Information is not held centrally on the specific location from which potential victims of modern slavery and human trafficking are first identified. For Scotland as a whole, the number of potential victims first identified in Scotland and referred to the National Referral Mechanism (the support service provided to potential victims of modern slavery and human trafficking) for the last three years are:

Year

Total number of potential victims of modern slavery and human trafficking first indentified in Scotland and referred to the National Referral Mechanism

2016

150

2015

145

2014

111

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
European Arrest Warrants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether European Arrest Warrants for (a) non-UK EU suspects in the UK and (b) UK suspects in the EU would be operable on the day after the UK leaves the EU in the absence of an agreement on security co-operation.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

We are confident that continued, practical cooperation between the UK and EU on law enforcement and national security is in the interests of both sides, so we approach these negotiations anticipating success. We do not want or expect a no deal outcome.

The details of the UK’s future relationship with the EU, including our participation in mechanisms such as the European Arrest Warrant, will be subject to negotiation.

Public safety in the UK and the rest of Europe will be at the heart of our negotiations and we will address the issue of the European Arrest Warrant in that context.

Q
Asked by Dan Jarvis
(Barnsley Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Visas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many refunds were issued by her Department to visa applicants in each of the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The data requested is not published by the Home Office.

Q
Asked by Afzal Khan
(Manchester, Gorton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons Review
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the terms of reference for the follow-up review of welfare in immigration detention to be undertaken by Stephen Shaw will include the decision-making process and criteria for detention.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017.

The final report is a matter for Mr Shaw, but the findings of his earlier review included recommendations relating to the use of detention and legal safeguards against excessive use of detention.

Grouped Questions: 107295 | 107299
Q
Asked by Lyn Brown
(West Ham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Poisons
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspicious transactions, within the terms of the Poisons Act 1972 as amended, have been reported using the (a) national contact point, (b) the chemical.reporting@met.police.uk email address and (c) local 101 or 999 services in each of the last two years.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Since the implementation of EU regulation 98/2013 on the marketing and use of explosives precursors in 2014, which introduced the legal requirement for retailers to report suspicious transactions and is now implemented through the Poisons Act 1972, the Home Office has engaged with a wide range of retailers that supply both regulated and reportable explosive precursors and poisons.

This ongoing work has resulted in suspicious transactions being reported to the police. Due to operational security, we are unable to provide exact details.

Q
Asked by Afzal Khan
(Manchester, Gorton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons Review
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the terms of reference for Stephen Shaw's follow-up review of the welfare of vulnerable people in immigration detention centres.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017.

The final report is a matter for Mr Shaw, but the findings of his earlier review included recommendations relating to the use of detention and legal safeguards against excessive use of detention.

Grouped Questions: 107300 | 107299
Q
Asked by Afzal Khan
(Manchester, Gorton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons Review
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the review of welfare in immigration detention conducted by Stephen Shaw will include an assessment of the potential benefits of a time limit on detention.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017.

The final report is a matter for Mr Shaw, but the findings of his earlier review included recommendations relating to the use of detention and legal safeguards against excessive use of detention.

Grouped Questions: 107300 | 107295
Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
House of Commons Commission
Elizabeth Tower: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what material has been used in the scaffolding for the renovation work on the Elizabeth Tower; and what the country of origin was of that material.
A
Answered by: Tom Brake
Answered on: 18 October 2017

A modular scaffolding system is being used for the refurbishment of the Elizabeth Tower. A UK sub-contractor is erecting the modular system, which is made from high tensile galvanised steel supplied from Germany, through a UK-based company.

The modular scaffolding system is supported by a steelwork gantry. The steelwork for the gantry has been procured through a UK manufacturer (Sir Robert McAlpine’s sub-contractor). The origin of the majority of the steel is British, but due to the quantity and size of the components required it has been necessary to source some steel from overseas suppliers, including in Brazil and the United Arab Emirates.

All of the steelwork structures have been assembled in the UK.

Q
Asked by Chris Law
(Dundee West)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Development
Overseas Aid: Disasters
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what progress her Department has made towards its commitment to increase spending on disaster risk reduction; and to which countries that additional funding has been allocated.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 18 October 2017

In response to the 2011 Humanitarian Emergency Response Review, DFID committed to embed disaster resilience within all country programmes, influencing DFID’s overall bilateral spend, rather than having a separate funding line for disaster risk reduction. For example:

  • In Ethiopia, DFID contributes towards the Productive Safety Net Programme to address hunger and poverty for the poorest rural Ethiopians. The safety net is designed to increase their ability to deal with weather induced shocks. This approach has helped to reduce food stress for 10 million people.
  • The Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters (BRACED) programme aims to benefit 5 million vulnerable people, especially women and children, in 13 developing countries. It will help them become more resilient to climate extremes and disasters, while gathering knowledge on how to avoid humanitarian disasters arising from climate extremes.
  • In Kenya, DFID supported the Arid Lands Support Programme (ASP) to support the resilience of some 475,000 people. The programme included: the expansion of a pilot Index Based Livestock Insurance mechanism for poor pastoralists; improved fodder production and storage; and the building of community assets, such as water storage”.

More recently, the UK’s new Humanitarian policy aims to build on the commitments made at the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit, including the Grand Bargain. This will include continuing to provide core, un-earmarked funding to multilateral agencies but making sure our funding is conditional to progress made in delivering radical system-wide reform as well as continue to improve the international, national and local capacities to manage disasters.

Q
Asked by Helen Jones
(Warrington North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Magistrates: Warrington
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) male and (b) female magistrates serve on the Warrington bench; and how many of those magistrates are resident (i) in each ward and (ii) outside that borough.
A
Answered by: Dominic Raab
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Q
Asked by Afzal Khan
(Manchester, Gorton)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Discrimination
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of trends in the levels of incidents of discrimination on grounds of race or religion reported by prisoners.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Our current policies allow for prisons to review and analyse trends at a local level. We are looking at our prisoner complaint processes including those relating to equality or discrimination issues in light of the recommendations of the Lammy Review into Race in the Criminal Justice System.

Q
Asked by Ian C. Lucas
(Wrexham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Personal Independence Payment: Wrexham
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average waiting time for personal independence payment tribunals in Wrexham constituency was in each of the last four years.
A
Answered by: Dominic Raab
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The information requested is set out in the table below.

Year1

Wrexham2 - PIP3 Average Clearance Times (weeks) 4

2016-2017

20.1

2015-2016

15.6

2014-2015

12.8

2013-20145

3.4

  1. The table shows information in the financial year April to March.
  2. First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) appeals for Wrexham constituents are heard in the Wrexham venue.

3 Personal Independence Payment (New Claim Appeals), which replaced Disability Living Allowance, was introduced on 8 April 2013, and includes Personal Independence Claims (Reassessments).

  1. Average Clearance Time - time taken from appeal receipt to outcome. This includes both those cleared at hearing and those cleared without the need for a tribunal hearing.

5There was only one appeal disposed of in Wrexham in 2013/2014, and that was without the need for a tribunal hearing, as such the waiting time is not representative of average waiting times.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale case management system and are the best data available.

Q
(East Yorkshire)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Transport
Traffic Lights
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what information his Department holds on recent trials in Amsterdam of switching off traffic lights to improve traffic flows; and if he will consider introducing similar trials at selective intersections during off peak periods in UK cities.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Department for Transport holds no information about such trials.

The operation of traffic lights is a matter for local authorities. Part-time operation is already possible, and an authority would need to consider the possible impacts carefully, particularly on road safety and accessibility.

Q
(Na h-Eileanan an Iar)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Multinational Companies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when he plans to publish the findings of his Department's review of the UK National Contact Point for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The National Contact Point (NCP) is currently considering the findings of the review. In line with the terms of reference, the key findings will be published on the NCP website later this year following consultation with the NCP Steering Board.

Q
Asked by Andrew Selous
(South West Bedfordshire)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Trade
UK Export Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reasons UK Export Finance can only lend for periods up to 10 years; by what legal authority the OECD imposes that lending restriction; what assessment he has made of the UK's trade position compared with that of international competitors as a result of that restriction; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The UK government supports a rules-based approach to international trade. The OECD Arrangement on Officially Supported Export Credits (the Arrangement) is an important agreement to ensure that exporters compete on price and quality and not the terms of government supported finance. It is binding on the UK as it is incorporated into UK law.

UK Export Finance can support lending of up to 18 years for certain projects, in line with the terms of the Arrangement, including its sector understandings. This is consistent with OECD competitors including France, Germany and the USA.

Q
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Human Papillomavirus: Vaccination
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the action taken by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency in 2012–13 to undertake enhanced pharmacovigilance alongside routine signal detection for the HPV vaccine was effective in preventing unfounded safety concerns; and if not, whether they will ask the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency to conduct further heightened pharmacovigilance at specific centres to assess those who suspect they have an adverse reaction to the HPV vaccination.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) put in place an enhanced form of pharmacovigilance for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine when the immunisation programme first commenced in 2008. This was because, at the time, the United Kingdom was the first country to implement a nationwide immunisation programme with the Cervarix brand of HPV vaccine. This enhanced form of pharmacovigilance was based primarily on the evaluation of general practice-derived electronic health record data, alongside Yellow Card reports. This has been effective in allowing the MHRA to determine that the reporting rate of particular suspected side effects, adjusted for under-reporting, is within the range of the expected natural incidence in the absence of HPV vaccination. As with all vaccines and medicines, the MHRA keeps the safety of HPV vaccine under continual review.

The Commission on Human Medicines has advised that available evidence does not support a link between HPV vaccination and the development of chronic illnesses, and reviews of HPV vaccine safety undertaken by international health authorities have reached similar conclusions. Most recently, in July 2017, the World Health Organization’s vaccine safety committee concluded that it has found no new adverse events of concern for HPV vaccine based on many very large, high quality studies.

The clinical assessment of individual patients remains the responsibility of their doctors and other healthcare providers.


Q
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Human Papillomavirus: Vaccination
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials were used by marketing authorisation holders for the testing of HPV vaccines prior to approval by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccines available in the European Union were authorised by the European Medicines Agency, and a detailed summary of its evaluation of the pre-licensing clinical trials for each vaccine is available in the European public assessment reports. These reports confirm that randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were considered in the evaluation of each HPV vaccine prior to approval.

Q
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Drugs: Side Effects
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is possible to inform the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency of signs and symptoms that arise after a Yellow Card report has been submitted; and if so, how this should be done.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Additional information can be submitted directly by the original reporter or by the pharmaceutical company as new information becomes available following the submission of the original report. Furthermore, follow-up information is frequently requested by the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in order to assess Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) reports more effectively and to improve the quality of information on the database.

Once a Yellow Card (YC) report is submitted and entered onto the database, an acknowledgment letter or email is sent to the reporter to confirm receipt and advise of the ADR reference number.

Additional information can be provided to the MHRA at any time following the submission of a YC report. The ADR reference number is required together with any additional information to ensure that this is added to the correct report. However, every effort is made to identify the correct report in instances where the ADR reference number has not been provided.

Q
Asked by Liam Byrne
(Birmingham, Hodge Hill)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Attorney General
Prosecutions: British Nationals Abroad
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, what steps he is taking under the (a) UK statutory and (b) international legal framework to improve rates of prosecution for British Citizens for participation in (i) acts of genocide and (b) war crimes committed abroad.
A
Answered by: Jeremy Wright
Answered on: 18 October 2017

On 21 September 2017, the United Nations Security Council voted unanimously to adopt UK-proposed Daesh Accountability Resolution 2379, which requests the UN Secretary General to establish an Investigative Team headed by a Special Adviser to collect, preserve and store evidence of Daesh crimes, beginning in Iraq.

The UK will work alongside the UN, Government of Iraq and other partners to implement Resolution 2379, ensuring that everything possible is done to hold Daesh to account for their crimes. This could potentially include the Team sharing evidence of crimes committed by British citizens in Iraq with UK authorities.

Within the CPS, all allegations of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide are dealt with by a team of specially trained prosecutors in the Counter Terrorism Division (CTD). CTD work closely with the war crimes team of the Metropolitan Police Counter Terrorism Command (SO15) under well established guidelines, details of which can be found here http://www.cps.gov.uk/publications/agencies/war_crimes.html#b

Each case investigated by the police which is referred to the CPS is considered on its own merits. A charging decision is then made in accordance with the Code for Crown Prosecutors.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 October 2017
Attorney General
European Court of Justice
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, how many times the Government has been ordered to pay damages in accordance with the European Court of Justice ruling in Francovich of 1991; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jeremy Wright
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Government does not maintain a central record of cases that include a claim for Francovich damages.

There have been at least 5 reported cases in which the Government has been ordered to pay such damages.

The Government has been able to identify at least 16 ongoing cases against it which involve a claim for Francovich damages. The fact that such a claim has been made does not mean that it is well-founded, or that damages will be payable.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 October 2017
Attorney General
European Court of Justice
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, whether the Government is involved in cases in which it might be ordered to pay damages in accordance with the European Court of Justice ruling in Francovich of 1991 in the event that it is defeated in such cases.
A
Answered by: Jeremy Wright
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The Government does not maintain a central record of cases that include a claim for Francovich damages.

There have been at least 5 reported cases in which the Government has been ordered to pay such damages.

The Government has been able to identify at least 16 ongoing cases against it which involve a claim for Francovich damages. The fact that such a claim has been made does not mean that it is well-founded, or that damages will be payable.

Q
(North Swindon)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Soft Drinks: Taxation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate the Government has made of the amount her Department will receive from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy in each year from 2018 to 2022; what proportion of that funding will be allocated to (a) the PE and Sport Premium, (b) the Healthy Pupils Capital Programme and (c) any other related sport and healthy living initiative in each of those years.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 18 October 2017

The government wants all pupils to be healthy and active. Every penny of England’s share of the Soft Drinks Industry Levy will be spent on projects that improve child health. The Department for Education will receive £575m from the levy, with revenue used to:

  • Double funding for the Primary PE and Sport Premium to £320m a year from 2017 to 2020. £415m of the funding for the doubled premium will be provided through the Soft Drinks Levy across FY17-18 to FY19-20.

FY 2017-18

£95m*

*Funding for premium is paid in academic years, with 7/12ths of the funding paid in the autumn term and the remaining 5/12ths in the summer term. This is the autumn payment of the 17/18 AY. Figures have been rounded.

FY 2018-19

£160m

FY 2019-20

£160m

  • Provide £100m in 2018/19 for a new healthy pupils’ capital fund.
  • Provide £60m to other relevant projects, for example breakfast clubs. The profile for this funding is yet to be agreed.

Funding for 2020-21 onwards will be assigned at the next Spending Review.

Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Plastics: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress the Government has made on international steps to tackle plastic pollution in the oceans; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 18 October 2017

At the recent Our Ocean conference the UK made several voluntary commitments to help tackle marine plastic pollution. These included signing up to the UN’s Clean Seas campaign, the Global Partnership on Marine Litter and the Global Ghost Gear Initiative. These programmes aim to transform habits, practices, standards and policies around the globe to reduce marine plastic pollution and the harm it causes.

Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 October 2017
Home Office
Europe: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of child refugees who are unaccompanied in each European country.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 October 2017

According to Eurostat data, 63,300 unaccompanied children claimed asylum in the EU in 2016:

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/2995521/8016696/3-11052017-AP-EN.pdf/30ca2206-0db9-4076-a681-e069a4bc5290.

This includes a breakdown of asylum applications by EU Member State.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Private Sector
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the cost to the public purse was of treatments provided to private patients in NHS hospitals in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

There should not be a net cost to the public purse of treating private patients. National Health Service organisations can treat private patients but only for the purpose of generating income to fund treatment of NHS patients.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Accident and Emergency Departments: Physician Associates
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether he plans to expand the role of physician associates in accident and emergency departments; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 18 October 2017

Health Education England (HEE) has doubled the numbers of Higher Education Institutes they support to offer Physician Associate (PA) training programmes across England, from 14 in 2015-16 to 29 in 2017-18. The increase in Physicians Associate training places is intended to provide a material difference of PAs available to support emergency departments.

It is estimated that there are over 360 qualified PAs working across the United Kingdom, approximately 30% of whom are working in emergency care. Annual graduate numbers are projected to exceed 900 by 2019, bringing the total number of qualified UK PAs to more than 3,000.

HEE is committed to investing in the growth of the PA workforce. As numbers of PAs increase HEE will monitor how many choose to work in emergency medicine and look at recruitment and retention models for PAs across the system. HEE will work to ensure that the proportion of newly qualified PAs currently entering emergency medicine is at least maintained and that emergency care remains an attractive option for PAs in the longer term.

On 12 October 2017, the Department launched a consultation on the regulation of four medical associate professions, including PAs.

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