Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 20 November 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Asbestos
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 20 November (HL2884), whether they plan to collect, and publish annually, data on the number of deaths of (1) teachers, (2) students, and (3) others, who may have contracted mesothelioma or other asbestos-related diseases while in school buildings, in order to enable an evaluation of the effectiveness of their asbestos registry.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 06 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether National Museums will review their imaging policies in the light of recent calls to abolish image fees for out of copyright paintings, prints and drawings.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2905 | HL2906 | HL2907 | HL2908 | HL2909 | HL2997 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 06 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the charging of image fees for academic use by National Museums on their use in academic lectures and publications.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2906 | HL2907 | HL2908 | HL2909 | HL2997 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 06 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether National Museums will consider providing open access to images of publicly owned, out of copyright paintings, prints, and drawings so that they are free for the public to reproduce; and whether they have held discussions with non-UK museums about such access.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2905 | HL2907 | HL2908 | HL2909 | HL2997 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 06 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they sanction each National Museum's interpretation of image copyright law; and if not, what measures are in place to review whether National Museums are interpreting image copyright law correctly.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2905 | HL2906 | HL2908 | HL2909 | HL2997 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 06 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much income was raised by each National Museum by licensing images of out of copyright works in the last five years.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2905 | HL2906 | HL2907 | HL2909 | HL2997 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 06 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how National Museums assess whether the image fees they charge for academic use are reasonable; and what representations they have made to academic communities to evaluate their fees.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2905 | HL2906 | HL2907 | HL2908 | HL2997 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 07 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government why National Museums charge fees to reproduce images of historic paintings, prints and drawings in their collections; whether they have received legal advice relating to the copyright issues applying to such reproductions; and if so, what that advice was.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2905 | HL2906 | HL2907 | HL2908 | HL2909 | HL2998
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 07 November 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the use of Commons Creative Licences by each National Museum; what proportion of those Licences permit amendments to be made to them; and whether they intend to review their use.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 November 2017

Decisions about image licensing and fees, and related copyright, are operational matters for the national museums as arm’s length bodies of government. As such, we do not hold data on the amount of income raised by image fees, on licences offered or the impact of fees on academic use.

Details of the process for requesting permission to reproduce images can be found on the respective websites of the national museums. The policies of both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery for example, allow some print reproduction of images for scholarly purposes free of charge, and several national museums offer or may offer a discount where image reproduction is for an academic purpose. Others, such as the British Museum and Science Museum, allow images to be used by the public under a Creative Commons licence. Additionally, many national museums have demonstrated significant efforts towards digitising their collections and in doing so are making our national collections accessible to the nation in new ways.

National museums are bound to provide free, in person, access to the permanent collections as a condition of government Grant-in-aid (GIA) funding and this policy has been a great success. Provided this condition is met, national museums are permitted and encouraged to pursue commercial activities, which may include image licensing. Such activities are an important supplement to museums in supporting their objectives to facilitate participation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Grouped Questions: HL2904 | HL2905 | HL2906 | HL2907 | HL2908 | HL2909 | HL2997
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 18 October 2017
Department for Education
Science: Graduates
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students have completed their studies in the UK over the last 20 years at (1) undergraduate, (2) taught masters, and (3) doctorate level, in (a) molecular biology,  biochemistry and related disciplines, and (b) medicinal chemistry and other areas of drug development.
Answered on: 01 November 2017

The Higher Education Statistics Authority (HESA) collects data on students enrolled and qualifying from courses at UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), including information on subject of study.

Data on numbers of students qualifying from undergraduate, taught masters and doctorate level courses in these subjects is provided in the tables attached for each year from 2007/08 to 2015/16. Prior to 2007/08, the low-level subject classification was provided by HEIs on a voluntary basis and as such, counts of students studying each of these subjects are not provided because they would not give a consistent picture of the total number of students over time. Data for 2016/17 will become available in January 2018.

The Joint Academic Coding System (JACS) is the classification of subjects used by HESA. The closest classification to “molecular biology, biochemistry and related disciplines” is “molecular biology, biophysics & biochemistry”, which has a JACS code of C7.

Medicinal chemistry has a JACS code of F150. The closest available classification to “biostatistics and medical statistics” or to “medical data analytics” is “medical statistics”, which has a JACS code of G311. These are detailed level codes and some universities may occasionally allocate students to more general codes. These codes are chosen by HEIs to best describe the course studied in its totality.

An appropriate classification is not available for “regulatory science” or “health economics” and hence figures for these subjects have not been provided. Further information on the most appropriate subject classification for a particular subject can be obtained by contacting HESA.

More information on JACS codes can be found at: http://www.hesa.ac.uk/support/documentation/jacs/jacs3-detailed.

Course data (PDF Document, 338.54 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL2196 | HL2259
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 18 October 2017
Department for Education
Science: Graduates
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students have completed their studies in the UK over the last 20 years at (1) undergraduate, (2) taught masters, and (3) doctorate level, in (a) biostatistics and medical statistics, and (b) regulatory science.
Answered on: 01 November 2017

The Higher Education Statistics Authority (HESA) collects data on students enrolled and qualifying from courses at UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), including information on subject of study.

Data on numbers of students qualifying from undergraduate, taught masters and doctorate level courses in these subjects is provided in the tables attached for each year from 2007/08 to 2015/16. Prior to 2007/08, the low-level subject classification was provided by HEIs on a voluntary basis and as such, counts of students studying each of these subjects are not provided because they would not give a consistent picture of the total number of students over time. Data for 2016/17 will become available in January 2018.

The Joint Academic Coding System (JACS) is the classification of subjects used by HESA. The closest classification to “molecular biology, biochemistry and related disciplines” is “molecular biology, biophysics & biochemistry”, which has a JACS code of C7.

Medicinal chemistry has a JACS code of F150. The closest available classification to “biostatistics and medical statistics” or to “medical data analytics” is “medical statistics”, which has a JACS code of G311. These are detailed level codes and some universities may occasionally allocate students to more general codes. These codes are chosen by HEIs to best describe the course studied in its totality.

An appropriate classification is not available for “regulatory science” or “health economics” and hence figures for these subjects have not been provided. Further information on the most appropriate subject classification for a particular subject can be obtained by contacting HESA.

More information on JACS codes can be found at: http://www.hesa.ac.uk/support/documentation/jacs/jacs3-detailed.

Course data (PDF Document, 338.54 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL2195 | HL2259
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 19 October 2017
Department for Education
Health Economics: Graduates
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students have completed their studies in the UK over the last 20 years at (1) undergraduate, (2) taught masters courses, and (3) doctorate level in the following disciplines: (a) health economics, and (b) medical data analytics or related disciplines.
Answered on: 01 November 2017

The Higher Education Statistics Authority (HESA) collects data on students enrolled and qualifying from courses at UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), including information on subject of study.

Data on numbers of students qualifying from undergraduate, taught masters and doctorate level courses in these subjects is provided in the tables attached for each year from 2007/08 to 2015/16. Prior to 2007/08, the low-level subject classification was provided by HEIs on a voluntary basis and as such, counts of students studying each of these subjects are not provided because they would not give a consistent picture of the total number of students over time. Data for 2016/17 will become available in January 2018.

The Joint Academic Coding System (JACS) is the classification of subjects used by HESA. The closest classification to “molecular biology, biochemistry and related disciplines” is “molecular biology, biophysics & biochemistry”, which has a JACS code of C7.

Medicinal chemistry has a JACS code of F150. The closest available classification to “biostatistics and medical statistics” or to “medical data analytics” is “medical statistics”, which has a JACS code of G311. These are detailed level codes and some universities may occasionally allocate students to more general codes. These codes are chosen by HEIs to best describe the course studied in its totality.

An appropriate classification is not available for “regulatory science” or “health economics” and hence figures for these subjects have not been provided. Further information on the most appropriate subject classification for a particular subject can be obtained by contacting HESA.

More information on JACS codes can be found at: http://www.hesa.ac.uk/support/documentation/jacs/jacs3-detailed.

Course data (PDF Document, 338.54 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL2195 | HL2196
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 18 October 2017
Department of Health
Clinical Audit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many National Clinical Audits and Patient Outcome Audits there are currently in NHS England under the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership; (2) what percentage of care costs and English disability adjusted life years these audits cover; and (3) which diseases currently have patient reported outcomes, and which will have by next year.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 October 2017

NHS England has advised that there are 38 projects currently within the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NCAPOP) Portfolio, which are at different stages of the commissioning cycle and comprise of 30 National Clinical Audits (NCA) and six Clinical Outcome Review Programmes or Mortality Review Programmes.

The audits’ primary focus is not care costs or disability adjusted life years. The audits are predominately based upon National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) evidence-based guidelines, technology appraisals and quality standards. NICE takes into account both clinical and cost effectiveness (mainly Quality Adjusted Life Years) where appropriate, and the clinical evidence exists to enable this. The audits commissioned by NCAPOP use the NICE evidence-based outputs as a foundation for the metrics collected so that where possible the audits are based upon a sound pre-existing evidence base. The exception where care costs are investigated is health economic work undertaken by the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme.

The following NCAs include patient reported outcomes (PROMS):

- the National Audit of Psychosis, awarded in March 2017, will collect PROMs in year two of its contract (2018-19) and will likely report these at the end of 2019 as part of the annual report;

- the National Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis Audit, which ran from 2013 to 2016, collected data on PROMS (capturing disease activity and impact of disease). This audit has been recommissioned (contract commenced October 2017) and will once again incorporate PROMs. It is due to report in year two of its contract (2018-19);

- the National Ophthalmology Audit is undertaking a study to examine the feasibility of collecting cataract PROMs data. This will likely be published in 2018-19;

- the National Bowel Cancer Audit has undertaken a study to examine the feasibility of reporting PROMs. This is expected to be published later in 2017; and

- the National Prostate Cancer Audit has collected PROMs data, which is likely to be reported in 2018. The project is being recommissioned and there is currently provision for a national collection of PROMs and patient reported experience measure data within year three of the new contract (2020-21).

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 18 October 2017
Department of Health
Cancer: Health Services
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in implementing the recommendations of the National Cancer Taskforce in the report Achieving world-class cancer outcomes: A strategy for England 2015–2020, and in particular (1) whether the “patient experience on par with clinical effectiveness and safety” workstreams have been established; (2) if established, when their implementation plans will be published; and (3) when the first pilots of patient reported outcomes are due to report.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 October 2017

NHS England's national cancer programme regularly publishes reports demonstrating progress on implementing the cancer strategy for England. On 18 October 2017, a two year progress report on the strategy was published.

Improving patient experience is a strategic priority of the strategy. The implementation plan for the strategy was published in May 2016 and work is underway on the patient experience ambitions set out in that plan.

Copies of Achieving World-Class Cancer Outcomes: A Strategy for England 2015-2020 Progress Report 2015-2020 and Achieving World-Class Cancer Outcomes: Taking the Strategy Forward implementation plan are attached.

We have developed a long-term quality of life metric, which uses patient reported outcomes questionnaires to show how well people are living 12 to 24 months after treatment. This is now being piloted across five cancer alliances and a full evaluation will be published prior to roll out in 2019.

Cancer strategy (PDF Document, 577.11 KB)
Implementation plan (PDF Document, 2.82 MB)
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 18 October 2017
Department of Health
Prostate Cancer: Surgery
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government where prostate cancer patients may find clear and easily accessible information regarding the variation in rates of incontinence and impotence after radical prostatectomy across the various providers in NHS England; and what are the lowest and highest rates of post-operative incontinence across NHS centres providing that procedure.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 October 2017

This information is not currently collected centrally.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 18 October 2017
Department of Health
Medicine: Research
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to allowing the routine and pseudonymised linking of existing care audit clinical outcome data to NHS activity data in order to make the UK a more attractive destination for medical research and innovation.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 31 October 2017

NHS England funds the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NACPOP) which comprises up to 40 audits and reviews, managed by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP). National clinical audits commissioned through the NCAPOP already, in most cases, link clinical outcome data to activity data such as the Hospital Episodes Statistics to give a rounded picture of the quality of care. NHS England is currently working with NHS Digital and HQIP to explore how to further improve the ability to link the data, as well as the timeliness and accessibility of clinical audit. The aim is to optimise use of the data to support effective commissioning of healthcare services and stimulate improvement in the quality of care by, for example, linking with electronic patient records in the future.

There are no limitations on who may apply for the data. In order to maximise the potential of the data for uses such as medical research and innovation, NHS Digital, who carry out some of the audits on behalf of HQIP, aim to share data wherever possible, subject to the appropriate legal and confidentiality requirements being met to safeguard public trust. All requests for pseudonymised and identifiable data under the Data Controllership of NHS Digital are managed through its central Data Access Request Service.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 14 June 2016
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Refugees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what sources of funding are available for students on two-year masters courses, and whether they have plans to increase the size of government-backed loans to cover the tuition fees for courses of longer than one year.
Answered on: 27 June 2016

The new master’s loan for postgraduate study of up to £10,000 will be available to eligible students studying on master’s courses from Academic Year 2016/17, including eligible master’s courses that last two years. This loan has been designed to provide a contribution to costs for students and the £10,000 maximum will apply to all eligible courses regardless of course length.

We have no current plans to offer larger loans for students on longer courses.

Other sources of finance for students include:

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 28 June 2016
Cabinet Office
Iraq: Internally Displaced People
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether data about all deaths of NHS cancer patients in England are collected by the National Cancer Registry; and if so, within how many months of death those data are collected.
A
Answered on: 05 July 2016

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

UKSA Letter for Member - NHS Cancer Data (PDF Document, 65.17 KB)
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 28 June 2016
Department of Health
Iraq: Minority Groups
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Prior of Brampton on 27 June (HL645), why no information is available of the number of patients who have died to date, particularly for those patients who consented prior to that answer.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 07 July 2016

Genomics England participants have consented to the collection of long term health data via the Health and Social Care Information Centre. This includes data on death but these data are collected and checked in accordance with standard procedures which means that there is a delay in linking to the whole genome sequencing data.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 28 June 2016
Department of Health
Middle East: Minority Groups
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Prior of Brampton on 27 June (HL645), how many of the 8,408 rare disease genomes and 1,671 cancer genomes have been shared with Genomics England's commercial interpretation partners.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 07 July 2016

Genomics England has confirmed that 293 rare disease and 310 cancer genomes have been sent to their clinical interpretation partners. Genomics England expects this flow to increase steadily as further links with clinical interpretation providers are established.

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