Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Electric Vehicles: Grants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many grants have been awarded to the owners of electric and hybrid vehicles.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 24 October 2017

From January 2011 to the end of June 2017 more than 100,000 purchasers of ultra low emission cars have received support from the plug-in car grant (currently up to £4,500) and more than 3,000 purchasers of ultra low emission vans have received up to £8,000 support from the plug-in van grant. Since its launch last year the plug-in motorcycle grant has also supported the purchase of a small number of zero emission motorcycles. In addition more than 37,000 installations of domestic chargepoints have been supported by the electric vehicle homecharge scheme since September 2014.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
HM Treasury
Tax Avoidance
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans the Government has to introduce legislation to restrict promoters of tax avoidance schemes.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 17 October 2017

The government has taken significant steps to tackle the promoters of tax avoidance schemes. It introduced the Promoters of Tax Avoidance Schemes (POTAS) regime in Budget 2013 to tackle high-risk promoters, and Finance Bill 2017-2019 goes further by introducing a new penalty on the enablers of tax avoidance.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Education
Truancy: Fines
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to review her Department's policy on fining parents whose children are absent from school because of term-time vacations.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 17 October 2017

Parents should avoid taking their children out of school during term-time, except in exceptional circumstances. The evidence shows every extra day of school missed can affect a pupil’s chances of achieving good GCSEs, which has a lasting effect on their life chances.

We have a robust local control regime to enforce this, which enables the school or local authority to issue a penalty notice that where parents have failed to secure their child’s regular attendance at school, including if they take their child out of school for a vacation without permission.

Every local authority must draw up a Code of Conduct for issuing penalty notices, in consultation with governing bodies and head teachers in their area. The Code will set out the occasions when it will be appropriate to issue a penalty notice. This can, for example, include circumstances where a pupil is persistently late to school without a valid reason. A penalty notice must be issued in accordance with that Code.

In April 2017 the Supreme Court unanimously agreed with our position that no child should be taken out of school without good reason.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department of Health
Eating Disorders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people in the UK have an eating disorder.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 17 October 2017

The information requested, about numbers of people with eating disorders in England and overall expenditure for severe eating disorder services, is not collected centrally.

NHS England is investing £150 million over 2016/17 to 2020/21 to develop eating disorder services in England.

Grouped Questions: 106452
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department of Health
Eating Disorders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much the NHS has spent on treating severe eating disorders in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 17 October 2017

The information requested, about numbers of people with eating disorders in England and overall expenditure for severe eating disorder services, is not collected centrally.

NHS England is investing £150 million over 2016/17 to 2020/21 to develop eating disorder services in England.

Grouped Questions: 106446
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the transfer of benefits from disability living allowance and employment and support allowance to personal independence payment.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 17 October 2017

The Personal Independence Payment (PIP) reassessment process only applies to Disability Living Allowance claimants (DLA) who were aged 16 to 64 on 8 April 2013 (the date PIP was introduced) or who reach the age of 16 after that date. Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) claimants will not be invited to claim PIP unless they are also in receipt of DLA.

Since July 2015 all DLA claimants who reach 16, report a change in needs or whose existing awards are ending have been reassessed for PIP. For those claimants with longer or indefinite awards, the reassessment process (Full PIP Rollout) has been in progress nationally since October 2015. Full PIP Rollout cases are selected at random and volumes are managed according to DWP and Assessment Provider capacity.

The latest available data on personal independence payment (PIP) clearances split by type of clearance (i.e. whether the claim was awarded, disallowed or withdrawn) can be found at https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Please note that PIP statistics are published at Great Britain level.

Grouped Questions: 106448
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) disability living allowance and (b) employment and support allowance claimants were not awarded personal independence payments following reassessment.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 17 October 2017

The Personal Independence Payment (PIP) reassessment process only applies to Disability Living Allowance claimants (DLA) who were aged 16 to 64 on 8 April 2013 (the date PIP was introduced) or who reach the age of 16 after that date. Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) claimants will not be invited to claim PIP unless they are also in receipt of DLA.

Since July 2015 all DLA claimants who reach 16, report a change in needs or whose existing awards are ending have been reassessed for PIP. For those claimants with longer or indefinite awards, the reassessment process (Full PIP Rollout) has been in progress nationally since October 2015. Full PIP Rollout cases are selected at random and volumes are managed according to DWP and Assessment Provider capacity.

The latest available data on personal independence payment (PIP) clearances split by type of clearance (i.e. whether the claim was awarded, disallowed or withdrawn) can be found at https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Please note that PIP statistics are published at Great Britain level.

Grouped Questions: 106447
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Motor Vehicles: Waste Disposal
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to introduce a vehicle scrappage scheme.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 17 October 2017

In July this year the Government launched the UK plan for tackling roadside nitrogen dioxide concentrations. The Government has required local councils to produce local air quality plans which reduce nitrogen dioxide levels in the fastest possible time.

The Government is considering how to support people impacted by local plans and will consult in the autumn on measures to support affected motorists, residents and businesses. This could, for example, include retrofitting vehicles, support for car clubs, improved public transport offers or targeted vehicle scrappage.

A number of vehicle manufacturers have recently launched their own national scrappage and trade in schemes that offer substantial discounts off the purchase of a new vehicle.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what financial support the Government provides to people who have terminal cancer and their families.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 September 2017

Children and young people with serious or critical illnesses such as cancer are able to apply for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) if they are aged under 16 or Personal Independence Payment (PIP) if aged 16 and above. DLA and PIP are tax free allowances, which are designed to contribute to the extra costs incurred as a result of long-term health conditions and/or disabilities. Children and young people in receipt of DLA or PIP can receive up to £141.10 a week. Entitlement to DLA and PIP depends on the effects that severe disability has on a person’s life and not on a particular disability or diagnosis. This is because people living with the same illnesses or disabilities may not necessarily have the same care or mobility needs.

Special considerations do however apply to children and adults who are terminally ill, and our arrangements recognise the particular difficulties faced by people who have only a short time to live. Their claims are fast-tracked and they are awarded the highest rate of the care component of DLA and the enhanced rate of the daily living component of PIP automatically without having to complete a qualifying period. This means that, if they claim straight away, they can get benefit as soon as they have been diagnosed as being terminally ill. The arrangements ensure that claims are dealt with quickly and sensitively. The legislation defines a person as terminally ill if ‘he suffers from a progressive disease and his death can reasonably be expected within six months’.

People over the age of 16 who are unable to work due to an illness or disability can claim Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) which has both a contributory strand accessible via a National Insurance contribution test and an income-related strand accessible via an income test. For cancer sufferers, a light touch evidence gathering process exists, to help determine eligibility. There is also a presumption that claimants receiving or recovering from cancer treatment will be placed in the Support Group which could entitle them to up to £109.65 per week, subject to suitable evidence from a healthcare professional such as a GP or oncologist.

Carers may also be able to qualify for Carer’s Allowance, which is currently £62.70 a week if they meet the eligibility criteria.

Trudi Hills, our Sector champion for banking, has been working with Macmillan to improve how the banking industry supports people when they receive a cancer diagnosis

Grouped Questions: 9397 | 9398
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Social Security Benefits: Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support is currently available to children and young people diagnosed with cancer for claims for (a) disability living allowance and (b) personal independence payments.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 September 2017

Children and young people with serious or critical illnesses such as cancer are able to apply for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) if they are aged under 16 or Personal Independence Payment (PIP) if aged 16 and above. DLA and PIP are tax free allowances, which are designed to contribute to the extra costs incurred as a result of long-term health conditions and/or disabilities. Children and young people in receipt of DLA or PIP can receive up to £141.10 a week. Entitlement to DLA and PIP depends on the effects that severe disability has on a person’s life and not on a particular disability or diagnosis. This is because people living with the same illnesses or disabilities may not necessarily have the same care or mobility needs.

Special considerations do however apply to children and adults who are terminally ill, and our arrangements recognise the particular difficulties faced by people who have only a short time to live. Their claims are fast-tracked and they are awarded the highest rate of the care component of DLA and the enhanced rate of the daily living component of PIP automatically without having to complete a qualifying period. This means that, if they claim straight away, they can get benefit as soon as they have been diagnosed as being terminally ill. The arrangements ensure that claims are dealt with quickly and sensitively. The legislation defines a person as terminally ill if ‘he suffers from a progressive disease and his death can reasonably be expected within six months’.

People over the age of 16 who are unable to work due to an illness or disability can claim Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) which has both a contributory strand accessible via a National Insurance contribution test and an income-related strand accessible via an income test. For cancer sufferers, a light touch evidence gathering process exists, to help determine eligibility. There is also a presumption that claimants receiving or recovering from cancer treatment will be placed in the Support Group which could entitle them to up to £109.65 per week, subject to suitable evidence from a healthcare professional such as a GP or oncologist.

Carers may also be able to qualify for Carer’s Allowance, which is currently £62.70 a week if they meet the eligibility criteria.

Trudi Hills, our Sector champion for banking, has been working with Macmillan to improve how the banking industry supports people when they receive a cancer diagnosis

Grouped Questions: 9396 | 9398
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Social Security Benefits: Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to ensure access to benefits for children and young people who have been diagnosed with cancer.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 18 September 2017

Children and young people with serious or critical illnesses such as cancer are able to apply for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) if they are aged under 16 or Personal Independence Payment (PIP) if aged 16 and above. DLA and PIP are tax free allowances, which are designed to contribute to the extra costs incurred as a result of long-term health conditions and/or disabilities. Children and young people in receipt of DLA or PIP can receive up to £141.10 a week. Entitlement to DLA and PIP depends on the effects that severe disability has on a person’s life and not on a particular disability or diagnosis. This is because people living with the same illnesses or disabilities may not necessarily have the same care or mobility needs.

Special considerations do however apply to children and adults who are terminally ill, and our arrangements recognise the particular difficulties faced by people who have only a short time to live. Their claims are fast-tracked and they are awarded the highest rate of the care component of DLA and the enhanced rate of the daily living component of PIP automatically without having to complete a qualifying period. This means that, if they claim straight away, they can get benefit as soon as they have been diagnosed as being terminally ill. The arrangements ensure that claims are dealt with quickly and sensitively. The legislation defines a person as terminally ill if ‘he suffers from a progressive disease and his death can reasonably be expected within six months’.

People over the age of 16 who are unable to work due to an illness or disability can claim Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) which has both a contributory strand accessible via a National Insurance contribution test and an income-related strand accessible via an income test. For cancer sufferers, a light touch evidence gathering process exists, to help determine eligibility. There is also a presumption that claimants receiving or recovering from cancer treatment will be placed in the Support Group which could entitle them to up to £109.65 per week, subject to suitable evidence from a healthcare professional such as a GP or oncologist.

Carers may also be able to qualify for Carer’s Allowance, which is currently £62.70 a week if they meet the eligibility criteria.

Trudi Hills, our Sector champion for banking, has been working with Macmillan to improve how the banking industry supports people when they receive a cancer diagnosis

Grouped Questions: 9396 | 9397
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Cabinet Office
Cybercrime
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans he has to review UK cyber-security capabilities.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 15 September 2017

The National Cyber Security Strategy sets out objectives focused on defending against cyber threats, deterring adversaries and developing the skills and capabilities required to make the UK more cyber secure.

Cabinet Office have implemented a comprehensive framework for assessing performance against the objectives of the strategy.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department for Education
Children: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many under 18-year olds enrolled on computer or IT-based (a) training and (b) degree courses in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 September 2017

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes statistics on enrolments at UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). The numbers of enrolments on higher education courses in computer science subjects by age since the academic year 2011/12 have been provided in table 1.

Statistics on participation in apprenticeships for the Information and Communication Technology sector subject area of learners aged under 19 since the academic year 2011/12 have been provided in table 2.

Table 1: Full-person Equivalent Computer Science Enrolments broken down by age

UK Higher Education Institutions

Academic Years 2011/12 to 2015/16

Age1

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Under 18 years old

675

585

665

715

705

18

9,285

8,540

9,720

10,605

11,295

19

12,920

12,565

12,970

14,335

15,140

20

13,765

13,810

14,025

14,410

15,480

21 to 24 years old

28,955

27,925

28,275

27,760

28,385

Over 24 years old

30,055

26,080

25,915

25,410

25,245

Unknown

5

5

5

5

5

Total

95,670

89,505

91,575

93,240

96,250

Source: DfE analysis of HESA student record 2011/12-2015/16

Notes:

* Figures are given in terms of Full-Person Equivalents. Where a student is studying more than one subject, they are apportioned between subjects that make up their course.

* Figures are enrolments across all years of study.

* Figures are rounded to the nearest 5.

1 Student age is as at 31 August in the reporting period.

Table 2: Apprenticeship Participation in Information and Communication Technology, Learners Aged Under 19

English Apprenticeship Providers

Academic Years 2011/12 to 2015/16

Age1

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Under 19 years old

11,000

9,320

9,350

10,600

11,800

Source: DfE analysis of Individualised Learner Record 2011/12-2015/16

Notes:

* A learner is participating in an academic year if their learning aim is active at any point during the relevant period.

* Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

1 Learner age is as at 31 August in the reporting period.

Learners may take training in computer science subjects as part of other qualifications. Table 2 does not show learners participating on these types of courses.

Participation in apprenticeships in other UK administrations should be requested from the respective governments.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department for Education
Young People: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to encourage more young people to train in computer-based industries.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 15 September 2017

The department is taking action at all stages of the education and training pipeline to help encourage young people into digital-related careers. We have introduced computing as a statutory national curriculum subject at all four key stages, in addition to a new Computer Science GCSE and A Level. The content was developed with industry experts to better equip pupils with the knowledge and skills they need to become active creators of digital technology.

We have supported employers to develop new apprenticeships in digital occupations across different levels, including in data analysis, digital marketing, network engineering and cyber security. We also established Ada, National College for Digital Skills. Driven by employers, Ada will train up to 5,000 students over the next five years for a wide range of digital careers and we are investing £500 million in reforming the technical education system, which includes the development of a specialist digital route with a clear pathway to employment.

Young people also need information on the range of jobs and careers, as well as opportunities to engage with employers. Information on careers, courses and training in computer-based industries is available from a number of sources such as the National Careers Service who provide independent, professional advice on careers, skills and the labour market, in addition to the legal requirement on educational establishments to provide guidance.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence: Cybercrime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many cyber-attacks on his Department were prevented during the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 14 September 2017

Our systems are regularly targeted by criminals, foreign intelligence services and other malicious actors.

I am withholding the specific information requested as its disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Ministry of Defence.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Ministry of Defence
Islamic State: Military Intervention
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what cyber-security agreements have been reached with allied states in the last five years.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 14 September 2017

The 2011 United Kingdom Cyber Security Strategy and the subsequent 2016 National Cyber Security Strategy both stress the importance of collaborating internationally to improve cyber security. The Ministry of Defence has developed relationships with other countries in line with these strategies, focused on the highest priority operational tasks and key operational military partners. In some cases, this has involved the signature of formal defence and security agreements. In others, it has involved lower level discussions between officials and informal programmes of activity.

The following formal high-level agreements have been reached by the Ministry of Defence in the last five years that explicitly cover cyber security.

The Defence Cyber Contact Group was established as a body operating under the Multi-Lateral Memorandum of Understanding signed on 23 June 2011, between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Subsequent amendments to the Memorandum of Understanding have allowed the membership of the Group to be extended to Canada and New Zealand. Its aim is to develop collaborative methods to support cyberspace activities. Cooperation on cyber defence involving these countries is also conducted under the Information Assurance and Computer Network Defence Memorandum of Understanding, which was amended in 2014.

In September 2016, the Ministry of Defence concluded a joint Cyber Research and Development, Test and Evaluation Memorandum of Understanding with the United States Department of Defense to enhance bilateral collaborative development of capabilities for operations in cyberspace.

The United Kingdom is also committed to co-operating on cyber defence in the context of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO). At the Wales Summit in September 2014, NATO Leaders declared that they had endorsed an Enhanced Cyber Defence Policy, affirmed that cyber defence is part of NATO’s core task of collective defence, and committed themselves to enhancing national cyber defence capabilities. Further commitments to cyber defence were made at the Warsaw Summit in July 2017, when the United Kingdom committed to the Cyber Defence Pledge in which NATO members agreed to enhance their cyber defence capabilities. European Union and NATO members also made the Joint European Union-NATO Declaration, which stated member countries would “Expand our coordination on cyber security and defence including in the context of our missions and operations, exercises and on education and training.”

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department for Education
Languages: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to increase the study of foreign languages in schools.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 14 September 2017

The Government recognises the importance of providing pupils with the opportunity to take a core set of academic subjects, including modern languages. Learning a foreign language provides an opening to other cultures; fosters pupils’ curiosity; deepens their understanding of the world; and equips pupils to study and work in other countries.

Evidence suggests that children can better be taught the sounds of new languages when they are younger. That is why the Government introduced a new foreign language for Key Stage 2 as part of the new National Curriculum, which came into force in September 2014.

The Government took action in 2010 to halt the decline in the number of school children taking language GCSEs by introducing the English Baccalaureate (EBacc), which requires secondary school pupils to take GCSEs in English, maths, science (including computer science), a language and history or geography. This has had a positive effect on the take up of languages in schools since introduced in 2010.

The Government published a response to the consultation on proposals to implement the EBacc on 19 July 2017. It set out that 75% of Year 10 pupils in state funded mainstream schools will start to study GCSEs in the EBacc combination of subjects by September 2022. This is as an important step to reaching 90% of Year 10 pupils studying GCSEs in the EBacc combination of subjects by 2025.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department of Health
Cancer: Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what improvements the Government has made to the provision of mental and emotional support available to children and young people suffering from cancer and their families since 2010.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 14 September 2017

In December 2016, NHS England announced that over £200 million would be made available to Cancer Alliances over the next two years to improve earlier diagnosis and support roll out of the Recovery Package and Stratified follow-up pathways. The Recovery Package has been designed so that patients, including young people, receive personalised care and support from the point they are diagnosed to improve their quality of life. This includes a Holistic Needs Assessment to help patients and clinicians assess a patient’s needs and plan appropriately for their care and ongoing support, including emotional and mental health support. Stratified follow-up pathways allow a more personalised approach to follow-up care after treatment, providing a better experience for patients.

Grouped Questions: 9607
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department of Health
Cancer: Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department has assessed the potential merits of improvements to the mental and emotional support available to young people suffering from cancer and to their families.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 14 September 2017

In December 2016, NHS England announced that over £200 million would be made available to Cancer Alliances over the next two years to improve earlier diagnosis and support roll out of the Recovery Package and Stratified follow-up pathways. The Recovery Package has been designed so that patients, including young people, receive personalised care and support from the point they are diagnosed to improve their quality of life. This includes a Holistic Needs Assessment to help patients and clinicians assess a patient’s needs and plan appropriately for their care and ongoing support, including emotional and mental health support. Stratified follow-up pathways allow a more personalised approach to follow-up care after treatment, providing a better experience for patients.

Grouped Questions: 9608
Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 07 September 2017
Department of Health
Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the financial burden on families which are directly affected by cancer.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 14 September 2017

The cancer care review, part of the cancer recovery package that is being rolled out across the National Health Service, is carried out within six months of a cancer diagnosis and covers post-treatment support, including the financial impact of cancer and patient awareness of prescription exemptions. Additionally, the Government provides financial safeguards for families that are directly affected by cancer through a range of benefits including Disability Living Allowance for children and young people with critical or serious illnesses; or Personal Independence Payment for those 16 or above; and Employment and Support Allowance for people over 16 who are unable to work. Carers may also qualify for Carer’s Allowance provided they meet the eligibility criteria.

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