Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Health Services: Reciprocal Arrangements
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 49 of his Department's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what healthcare arrangements have been set out in EU Regulations and domestic law for UK nationals and EU citizens that the Government will seek to protect and guarantee.
A
Answered by: Mr Steve Baker
Answered on: 31 July 2017

During negotiations and as part of a reciprocal deal, we are looking to protect the healthcare rights of both UK-insured individuals who are living in the EU and of EU-insured individuals who are living in the UK before the specified date.

The UK will seek to protect the reciprocal healthcare arrangements which enable UK residents to obtain a European Health Insurance Card, allowing them to benefit from free, or reduced cost, needs-arising healthcare while on a temporary stay in the EU.

The UK is also seeking to protect EU healthcare arrangements that enable those who have moved to the EU and continue to receive a UK benefit or draw a UK state pension to receive healthcare cover by the UK in their country of residence.

We will also seek to protect EU citizens’ eligibility for NHS funded healthcare in the UK and vice versa for UK nationals in the EU. Those who present valid documentation receive treatment on the NHS, the cost of which is reimbursed to the UK by the member state which provides the individual’s insurance.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
British Nationals Abroad: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of his Department's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what rights the Government will seek to guarantee for UK nationals who work in one EU Member State but live in another EU Member State or the UK.
A
Answered by: Mr Steve Baker
Answered on: 26 July 2017

We have been clear that we expect the EU to ensure that life for UK nationals in the EU continues much as it does now, in the same way that we are doing for EU nationals in the UK. This must therefore include the ability to work in one Member State but live in another, for those to whom this applies.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
British Nationals Abroad: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2017 to Question 3786, what assessment he has made of the level of rights protection offered to UK citizens in other EU Member States as proposed in the Brexit: negotiating directives issued on 22 May 2017 by the European Council, compared with the offer outlined in his Department's policy paper, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Steve Baker
Answered on: 26 July 2017

We have published a joint technical note, with the EU, on the comparison of UK and EU positions on citizens’ rights. There is much common ground between the two positions, a clearer understanding on the detail of the positions, and significant convergence on the key issues that really matter to citizens.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 6 of her Department’s policy paper, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether EU citizens who are full-time carers for their relatives will be eligible to qualify for settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 25 July 2017

The Government’s policy paper (Cm 9464), sets out that EU citizens, including carers and potential victims of trafficking, who arrive in the UK before the specified date and have five years’ continuous residence will be able to apply for UK settled status. EU citizens who arrive before the specified date, but do not yet have five years continuous residence, will be able to make an application to stay until they have built up the necessary five continuous years’ residence to be able to apply for UK settled status.

Grouped Questions: 4288 | 4422
Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 6 of her Department’s policy paper, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether EU citizens who are full-time carers for a relative who dies before the EU citizen carer has accrued five years’ residence will be eligible to qualify for settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 25 July 2017

The Government’s policy paper (Cm 9464), sets out that EU citizens, including carers and potential victims of trafficking, who arrive in the UK before the specified date and have five years’ continuous residence will be able to apply for UK settled status. EU citizens who arrive before the specified date, but do not yet have five years continuous residence, will be able to make an application to stay until they have built up the necessary five continuous years’ residence to be able to apply for UK settled status.

Grouped Questions: 4289 | 4422
Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 6 of her Department’s policy paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what provision the Government plans to make available with respect to the legal status and rights of EU citizens in the UK who are potential victims of trafficking and modern slavery.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 25 July 2017

The Government’s policy paper (Cm 9464), sets out that EU citizens, including carers and potential victims of trafficking, who arrive in the UK before the specified date and have five years’ continuous residence will be able to apply for UK settled status. EU citizens who arrive before the specified date, but do not yet have five years continuous residence, will be able to make an application to stay until they have built up the necessary five continuous years’ residence to be able to apply for UK settled status.

Grouped Questions: 4289 | 4288
Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 6 of her Department's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, how the term continuous in paragraph 27 is defined; and what proof of continuous residence will be required.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 25 July 2017

We intend to use the definition of continuous residence from Article 16(3) of the EU Free Movement Directive (2004/38/EC).

The Home Office will set out in due course what evidence may be provided as proof of continuous residence. We are committed to creating a streamlined and user-friendly applications system using existing government data to minimise the burden of documentary evidence required.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 6 of her Department’s policy paper, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether non-EU family members who are married to a disabled or terminally ill EU citizen who passes away before having accrued five years’ residence will be eligible to qualify for settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 20 July 2017

The Government’s policy paper (Cm 9464), sets out the UK’s proposals for securing the rights of EU citizens and their family members. Paragraph 29 footnote 6 sets out that the definition of family member includes those with retained rights. The Free Movement Directive sets out that rights of residence can be retained by family members of an EU citizen in certain circumstances, for example, the death of the EU citizen. We will set out the details of the new scheme, including detailed eligibility criteria, in due course.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Immigration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of his Department's policy paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether a child born after the specified date to a lawful EU resident who arrived in the UK before the specified date will be eligible for settled status.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 20 July 2017

Children of EU citizens who hold settled status and are born in the UK will automatically acquire British citizenship. EU resident parents who arrived before the specified date, but who need to apply for permission to stay post-exit in order to meet the five year residence requirement, will also need to apply for the same permission on behalf of their child when their child is born.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
British Nationals Abroad: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of the Government's policy paper entitled, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether EU family dependents of UK citizens who return to the UK after the specified date will be subject to the immigration rules in respect of their family members; and whether there will be different rules in relation to EU and non-EU national family members.
Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
British Nationals Abroad: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 42 of the Government's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether UK citizens and their family members covered by EC Regulation 883/2004 on the coordination of social security systems who, at the date of entry into force of the Withdrawal Agreement, are in receipt of exportable benefits such as attendance allowance, carer's allowance, disability living allowance or winter fuel payments will continue to enjoy receipt of those benefits; and whether after the date of entry into force of the Withdrawal Agreement, any new claimants from UK citizens living and working in the EU will have their eligibility for those exportable benefits continued indefinitely.
Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Customs Officers: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of his Department's policy paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017 what rights will be accorded to staff at customs points who work in the UK but live in another EU member state.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 19 July 2017

The UK has separate agreements in place with France and Belgium that determine the status and rights of nationals employed at juxtaposed controls, including customs areas. These agreements are separate from the UK’s membership of the EU and will remain in force after we leave.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
EU Immigration: Migrant Workers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of his Department's policy paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what rights will be accorded to frontier workers who work in the UK but live in another EU Member State.
Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 13 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EEA Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 6 of her Department's policy paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what provision will be made for EEA trafficked persons to apply for settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 July 2017

The Government’s policy paper (Cm 9464), sets out that EU citizens, which includes those who are victims of trafficking, who arrive in the UK before the specified date and have five years’ continuous residence will be able to apply for UK settled status. EU citizens who arrive before the specified date, but do not yet have five years’ continuous residence, will be able to make an application to stay until they have built up the necessary five continuous years’ residence to be able to apply for UK settled status.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 13 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 July 2017 to Question 3708, on the period of blanket residence permission outlined in paragraph 24 of her Department's policy paper, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, how (a) employers, (b) landlords, (c) banks and building societies, (d) the DVLA and (e) benefit agencies will be able to determine who has deemed leave.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 18 July 2017

The Government will set out its plans in due course for redesigning the immigration system to introduce controls on future migration to the UK by EU nationals, including any plans for adjusting statutory checks by employers, landlords and other service providers.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 06 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Immigration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 10 of his Department's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what additional steps people who have received permanent residence documentation will have to take in order to secure settled status.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 17 July 2017
There is no need to do anything now. The UK will remain a member of the EU until March 2019 and there will be no change to the rights and status of EU citizens living in the UK, nor UK nationals living in the EU, during this time. Permanent residence status is linked to the UK’s membership of the EU and so will no longer be valid after we leave. Therefore EU citizens do not need to apply for documentation confirming their permanent residence status. We will be asking EU citizens to make an application to the Home Office for documentation demonstrating their new settled status in due course. We will make the process as streamlined as possible for all individuals, including those who already hold a residence document under current free movement rules. Our intention is that the grace period last up to two years, giving people plenty of time to regularise their status. Anyone who would like to find out the latest information, including when they will need to sign up for the new scheme, can sign-up for email updates here.
Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 06 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Immigration: British Nationals Abroad
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 45 of his Department's policy paper entitled, Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what his policy is on preserving the right of UK nationals to move and reside in other EU Member States after the UK ceases to be a member of the EU as part of the negotiations on the UK leaving the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 17 July 2017

The Government fully recognises that those EU citizens resident in the UK before the specific date, and UK national resident in EU Member States, enjoy access to public services such as healthcare a, education, employment and housing. We are proposing a reciprocal deal that will protect the right of UK national in the EU to continue to live and work in the EU.

This includes the ability to work in one Member State but live in another, for those to whom this applies.
Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Immigration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 49 of his Department’s policy paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether EU citizens and UK nationals who are not benefiting from healthcare arrangements before the specified date will be able to do so at a date in the future.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 17 July 2017

The UK will seek to protect the healthcare arrangements currently set out in EU Regulations and domestic UK law for UK nationals and EU citizens who benefit from these arrangements before the specified date.

Healthcare arrangements for future EU migrants to the UK will be subject to the negotiations.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 06 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of his Department's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, whether non-UK EU nationals will continue to benefit from the right to equal treatment in the UK after the specified date.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 14 July 2017

Our offer applies to all EU citizens equally. We will not treat citizens of one member state differently to those of another, except regarding the special arrangements for Irish nationals. Our offer clearly sets out that EU citizens who have settled status will be treated the same as comparable UK nationals.

We have set out a fair offer to protect the rights and entitlements of EU nationals living in the UK. Settled status will be offered to those that have been continuously resident in the UK for 5 years. Those that have been here for less will be eligible for temporary leave which allows them to remain in the UK with the same broad set of rights and entitlements as they do now until they can get settled status.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
Asked on: 06 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 6 of his Department's policy paper entitled Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June 2017, what rights and entitlements a non-UK EU citizen will have who arrived in the UK before the specified date but has not lived in the UK for five years.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 14 July 2017

Those EU citizens who arrived and became a resident before the specified date but who have not accrued five years’ continuous residence at the time of the UK’s exit will be able to apply for temporary status in order to remain resident in the UK until they have accumulated five years, after which they will be eligible to apply for settled status.

EU citizens on this pathway to settled status will continue to be able to access the same benefits that they can access now. If these individuals go on to acquire settled status, they will then be able to access benefits on the same terms as comparable UK residents.

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