Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 June 2017
Department for Education
Skilled Workers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government plans to take to prevent the potential loss of highly skilled workers in the UK after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 15 August 2017

The Prime Minister has been clear that we want to strike an early agreement about the rights of EU citizens living in the UK, and UK citizens living in the EU and give citizens as much certainty as possible, as early as possible. The Government’s policy paper (CM 9464), which was laid before Parliament on 26 June, sets out detailed proposals on safeguarding the position of EU nationals living in the UK.

The UK will remain an open and tolerant country; one that recognises the valuable contribution migrants make to our society and welcomes those with the skills and expertise to make our nation better. After we leave the EU, we will control immigration so that we continue to attract the brightest and the best to work or study in the UK, but will manage the process properly so that our immigration system serves the national interest.

We are considering the options for our future immigration system very carefully. As part of that, it is important that we understand the impacts of different options on different sectors of the economy and the labour market. We will build a comprehensive picture of the needs and interests of all parts of the UK and look to develop a system which works for all.

Q
Asked by Ian Austin
(Dudley North)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Closures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will list the schools that opened since 2010 that have closed; and how many pupils were on the school roll in each school at the time of closing.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 15 August 2017

The current school system has delivered places where they are needed, on time, to ensure that every child has a school place, with 735,000 new school places created between 2010 and 2016.

39 schools have been opened and then closed since 2010. These are listed in the attached table. The Department does not record the number of pupils on a school roll at the time of closing.

Schools opened and closed since 2010 (Excel SpreadSheet, 14.58 KB)
Q
Asked by Diana Johnson
(Kingston upon Hull North)
Asked on: 03 July 2017
Department for Education
Teachers: Qualifications
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 14 January 2013, Official Report, column 533W, on teachers: qualifications, how many people have obtained each type of school-based qualification in (a) music, (b) drama, (c) theatre-studies and (d) art in each year since 2009-10.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 14 August 2017

The number and percentage of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 achieving[1] each type of school based qualification in (a) Music, (b) Drama, (c) Theatre studies and (d) Art for the years 2013/14 - 2015/16 are shown in the attached table. Drama and Theatre Studies are grouped together as part of the school performance tables and are therefore presented together in the data.

The percentages of the total GCSE cohort entered for each subject are included in the attached table. The GCSE cohort is defined as all pupils who entered at least one GCSE subject and consists of 603,305 pupils in 2013/14, 597,477 pupils in 2014/15 and 584,013 pupils in 2015/16.

Caution should be taken when interpreting the ‘percentage of GCSE cohort entered for Art/Music/Drama & Theatre Studies’. GCSE Art, Music and Drama & Theatre studies are categories comprising more than one subject and a pupil may have been entered for multiple subjects, whereas, the GCSE cohort figures relate to individual pupils. Therefore, this figure slightly over-estimates the number of pupils entering these subject areas.

Data for the years 2009/10 – 2012/13 are not provided because collating this information is complex due to changes in the school performance tables and a lack of published content prior to 2012[2], therefore producing this data would incur a disproportionate cost.

The number of entries to the requested subjects, and grades achieved, is published at school level as part of the ‘Key Stage 4 performance tables’ underlying data[2].

Caution should also be used when comparing this data with that provided on 14 January 2013, Official Report, column 533W[3] due to methodological changes in the intervening years.

[1] ‘Achievement’ (or a pass) has been defined as any result which does not count as a ‘Fail’ or ‘Ungraded’ for that particular qualification. For more information on the grading structures in place for the different qualifications noted, see the Ofqual register: https://register.ofqual.gov.uk/.

[2] This data is available for download from: https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/download-data by selecting the year you require and downloading ‘Key stage 4 qualification and subject data’ for that year.

[3] https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmhansrd/cm130114/text/130114w0003.htm.

2651_table (Word Document, 14.49 KB)
Q
Asked by Ian Austin
(Dudley North)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Closures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will list the schools that opened since 2010 that have closed in the middle of the school year; and how many pupils were on the school roll in each school at the time of closing.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 14 August 2017

The current school system has delivered places where they are needed, on time, to ensure that every child has a school place, with 735,000 new school places created between 2010 and 2016.

The 13 schools that have been opened and have since closed in the middle of a school year since 2010 are listed in the table below. The Department does not record the number of pupils on a school roll at the time of closing.

Name of School

Opening Date

Closure Date

Type of School

1. Weston Academy[1]

01/04/2012

31/12/2015

Academy Converter

2. Discovery New School

08/09/2011

03/04/2014

Free School

3. The Durham Free School

02/09/2013

31/03/2015

Free School

4. Southwark Free School

01/02/2012

09/02/2017

Free School

5. Children's Support Centre, Wivenhoe

01/01/2010

31/03/2011

PRU

6. Children's Support Centre, Hadleigh

01/01/2010

31/03/2011

PRU

7. Riverside

15/02/2010

01/02/2011

PRU

8. Clissold Park School

01/09/2010

31/12/2012

PRU

9. The KS3 Pupil Referral Unit Burley Park Centre

01/09/2010

01/05/2016

PRU

10. Manchester KS3 and 4 PRU

01/02/2011

30/04/2011

PRU

11. Riverside

03/01/2012

31/12/2013

PRU

12. North Personalised Education Centre (NPEC)

01/08/2012

01/02/2013

PRU

13. Bassetlaw Learning Centre

31/08/2012

31/12/2014

PRU

[1] Weston Academy was an existing LA Community School that converted to become an academy and then closed during the period.

Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Bath University: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the challenges facing honeybees in the UK.
A
Answered on: 18 July 2016

There are 25 species of bumblebee resident in the UK, including the short-haired bumblebee which is currently being re-introduced under Natural England’s Species Recovery Programme.

In 2014 Defra published independent research on the status of pollinators in the UK. The study identified an overall decline in wild bee diversity over the last 50 years. This concluded that bumblebee species that have become less widespread are associated with the loss of flower-rich habitat, driven by changes in agricultural land use and urbanisation.

Both Environmental Stewardship and now the new Countryside Stewardship schemes fund the provision of food and habitat for wild pollinators. The new scheme in particular incorporates a Wild Pollinator and Farm Wildlife package which provides year-round food, winter shelter and nesting places essential for pollinators.

Although honeybees face many of these environmental pressures their population is driven by the number of beekeepers willing and able to keep bees. There is some evidence that the number of beekeepers, and therefore the number of honey bees, may have increased since 2009 as more keepers are registered on the National Bee Unit’s BeeBase and with beekeeping associations.

Grouped Questions: HL945
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Bath University: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of progress towards achieving a more diverse judiciary in the last six years.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 09 August 2017

Minister Johnson, the Minister for Universities and Science, in his speech at Reform on 20 July 2017, called on the sector to put an end to increasing vice chancellor pay and provide justification for the exceptional circumstances for large pay awards to improve value for money.

He also announced that he will be issuing new guidance to the Office for Students (OfS) to use its powers to address this problem.

Universities are autonomous bodies and it is their responsibility to determine pay arrangements for their staff. However, Minister Johnson has called for action to put an end to the upward spiral in vice chancellors’ pay.

The Government’s 2017/18 grant letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) stated:

“The Government is clear that efficiency includes demonstrating restraint in senior pay and remains concerned about the substantial upwards drift in salaries of some top management. We would like to see senior leaders in the sector exercise more pay restraint.”

HEFCE issued guidance to the sector on severance pay and the remuneration of senior staff in June 2017: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2017/CL,172017/ (copy attached).

It states that governing bodies and remuneration committees should always bear in mind the principles outlined and to record clearly the rationale behind their decisions, including any divergence from the guidance.

Grouped Questions: HL950 | HL946 | HL947 | HL948 | HL949 | HL950 | HL951
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Higher Education: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many judges have been appointed in each of the past six years; and how many of those were (1) from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, (2) women, and (3) disabled.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 18 July 2016

The Government is committed to improving judicial diversity and co-ordinates this effort through the Judicial Diversity Forum, a cross-stakeholder group with representatives from the Ministry of Justice, Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC), the judiciary and legal profession.

The Judicial Diversity Forum replaced the Judicial Diversity Taskforce in 2014 as the body responsible for encouraging judicial diversity; it has implemented a number of schemes to help improve judicial diversity. Recent examples include the 100 plus Diversity and Community Relations Judges doing invaluable work with the community to expel myths about working for the judiciary and interact with schools, universities and the legal professions. There is also a Judicial Mentoring Scheme where judges volunteer to be mentors; providing invaluable advice and guidance to those from under-represented groups seeking a judicial appointment or those wishing to progress in their judicial career.

Data on judicial appointments are published regularly on gov.uk. The below figures show how many candidates were recommended by the JAC for judicial appointment in each of the past six years and how many of those were (1) from black and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, (2) women and (3) disabled. As these figures are JAC recommendations, they may include a small number of candidates that do not go on to be appointed.

  • 2010- 759 candidates were recommended out of which 75 (10%) were from BAME, 309 (41%) were women and 41 (5%) were disabled.
  • 2011- 894 candidates were recommended out of which 91 (10%) were from BAME backgrounds, 406 (45%) were women and 34 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2012- 371 candidates were recommended out of which 48 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 152 (41%) were women and 22 (6%) were disabled.
  • 2013- 572 candidates were recommended out of which 38 (7%) were from BAME backgrounds, 303 (53%) were women and 81 (14%) were disabled.
  • 2014- 312 candidates were recommended out of which 40 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 134 (43%) were women and 11 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2015- 319 candidates were recommended out of which 28 (9%) were from BAME backgrounds, 143 (45%) were women and 10 (3%) were disabled.

The Government acknowledges that within the judiciary there is an under-representation of women, those who are disabled and those from a BAME background. However, recent statistics show some improvement which suggests ongoing diversity initiatives, co-ordinated by the Forum, are beginning to have an impact:

1) 12% of judges across Courts and Tribunals under 50 years of age are from a BAME background (around 14% of the UK population are from BAME groups).

2) JAC Official Statistics from April 2015 to March 2016 showed women made up 45% of those recommended for appointment overall (140 of 308 recommendations).

Grouped Questions: HL949
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Bath University: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what resources they have provided for diversity and equality initiatives in the judiciary; and what assessment they have made of the success of those initiatives to date.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 18 July 2016

The Government is committed to improving judicial diversity and co-ordinates this effort through the Judicial Diversity Forum, a cross-stakeholder group with representatives from the Ministry of Justice, Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC), the judiciary and legal profession.

The Judicial Diversity Forum replaced the Judicial Diversity Taskforce in 2014 as the body responsible for encouraging judicial diversity; it has implemented a number of schemes to help improve judicial diversity. Recent examples include the 100 plus Diversity and Community Relations Judges doing invaluable work with the community to expel myths about working for the judiciary and interact with schools, universities and the legal professions. There is also a Judicial Mentoring Scheme where judges volunteer to be mentors; providing invaluable advice and guidance to those from under-represented groups seeking a judicial appointment or those wishing to progress in their judicial career.

Data on judicial appointments are published regularly on gov.uk. The below figures show how many candidates were recommended by the JAC for judicial appointment in each of the past six years and how many of those were (1) from black and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, (2) women and (3) disabled. As these figures are JAC recommendations, they may include a small number of candidates that do not go on to be appointed.

  • 2010- 759 candidates were recommended out of which 75 (10%) were from BAME, 309 (41%) were women and 41 (5%) were disabled.
  • 2011- 894 candidates were recommended out of which 91 (10%) were from BAME backgrounds, 406 (45%) were women and 34 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2012- 371 candidates were recommended out of which 48 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 152 (41%) were women and 22 (6%) were disabled.
  • 2013- 572 candidates were recommended out of which 38 (7%) were from BAME backgrounds, 303 (53%) were women and 81 (14%) were disabled.
  • 2014- 312 candidates were recommended out of which 40 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 134 (43%) were women and 11 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2015- 319 candidates were recommended out of which 28 (9%) were from BAME backgrounds, 143 (45%) were women and 10 (3%) were disabled.

The Government acknowledges that within the judiciary there is an under-representation of women, those who are disabled and those from a BAME background. However, recent statistics show some improvement which suggests ongoing diversity initiatives, co-ordinated by the Forum, are beginning to have an impact:

1) 12% of judges across Courts and Tribunals under 50 years of age are from a BAME background (around 14% of the UK population are from BAME groups).

2) JAC Official Statistics from April 2015 to March 2016 showed women made up 45% of those recommended for appointment overall (140 of 308 recommendations).

Grouped Questions: HL948
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Higher Education: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to support the development and introduction of pre-appointment training for those from under-represented groups seeking judicial appointments.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 09 August 2017

Minister Johnson, the Minister for Universities and Science, in his speech at Reform on 20 July 2017, called on the sector to put an end to increasing vice chancellor pay and provide justification for the exceptional circumstances for large pay awards to improve value for money.

He also announced that he will be issuing new guidance to the Office for Students (OfS) to use its powers to address this problem.

Universities are autonomous bodies and it is their responsibility to determine pay arrangements for their staff. However, Minister Johnson has called for action to put an end to the upward spiral in vice chancellors’ pay.

The Government’s 2017/18 grant letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) stated:

“The Government is clear that efficiency includes demonstrating restraint in senior pay and remains concerned about the substantial upwards drift in salaries of some top management. We would like to see senior leaders in the sector exercise more pay restraint.”

HEFCE issued guidance to the sector on severance pay and the remuneration of senior staff in June 2017: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2017/CL,172017/ (copy attached).

It states that governing bodies and remuneration committees should always bear in mind the principles outlined and to record clearly the rationale behind their decisions, including any divergence from the guidance.

Grouped Questions: HL947 | HL946 | HL947 | HL948 | HL949 | HL950 | HL951
Q
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Transport
Higher Education: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect High Speed Two (HS2) Ltd to have completed its report on the potential maximisation of rail use for the handling of spoil and construction materials.
A
Answered on: 12 July 2016

An initial study has been undertaken to explore how to maximise, as far as reasonably practicable, the movement of material by rail at Euston. The study highlights a number of technical options which are now being assessed in detail with respect to their impact on passengers, their environmental and socio-economic impacts, and impacts on the HS2 programme. An initial decision on how to proceed will be made following the completion of this further assessment which is expected to be in advance of the HS2 Select Committee in the House of Lords hearing petitions in relation to Euston.

Q
Asked by Stephen Kerr
(Stirling)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Small Businesses: Scotland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Scottish Government on strategic initiatives to support small businesses in Scotland; and what the agreed steps to be taken were at those discussions.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017
Holding answer received on 17 July 2017

As set out in my responses to PQ 411 and PQ 2586 the UK and Scottish Governments have been in discussion at both ministerial and official levels.

Business support in Scotland is largely devolved however, the department engages with all the devolved regions on a number of initiatives aimed at supporting small businesses. Government programmes, backed by the British Business Bank (BBB), the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme (EFGS) and Innovate UK are investing over £700m to support around 4,500 Scottish companies including: -

  • BBB programmes are currently facilitating approximately £405m of finance in Scotland.
  • Over 2,600 loans totalling over £15m via the Start-Up Loans programme. The Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme is currently facilitating over £61m of finance to 700 businesses in Scotland.
  • The Investment Programme is currently facilitating over £214m of finance to over 1,000 businesses.
  • Innovate UK is committed to support some 206 innovation projects and to invest £28.8m.
Q
(Don Valley)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Iron and Steel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of how much steel required for the construction of High Speed 2 will be sourced in the UK.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017

It is anticipated that around two million tonnes of steel will be used across the HS2 programme. Last December, the Government issued updated guidance to public sector contracting authorities on how to ensure that they take full account of the value provided by UK steel producers when conducting their procurement activities.

To maximise British involvement in supply chain opportunities HS2 has engaged extensively with businesses of all sizes from a diverse range of sectors and across the UK; also working closely with UK Steel, British Constructional Steel Association, the Galvanisers Association and the Confederation of British Metalforming.

HS2 Ltd’s recently announced successful Main Works Contractor Tenderers have all confirmed they will comply with works information and further the requirements and spirit of HM Government Procurement Guidance on steel. HS2 will continue to engage with any British business that is interested in supporting its supply chain, throughout the lifetime of the programme.

This level of detail builds upon the work this Government has achieved in publishing details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects which shows how the Government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. This steel-specific pipeline complements the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline, which set out over £500 billion worth of planned private and public investment.

Q
(Don Valley)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Iron and Steel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to encourage UK companies to buy British steel.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017

We have commissioned independent research into future market opportunities for UK steel, which has involved substantial dialogue with existing and potential steel consumers across the whole of the UK. We are actively encouraging the UK steel sector to identify the capabilities it will need to act on the findings, and use this information to ensure they are well placed to plan and bid for future work.

This is further complemented by the Government publishing details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects which shows how the government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. This steel-specific pipeline further builds upon the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline, which set out over £500 billion worth of planned private and public investment; both which enable UK companies to anticipate material demand.

Q
(Don Valley)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Iron and Steel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether pipeline data will be made available to UK steel producers who may wish to meet steel requirements for High Speed 2; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017

All of the procurement details specifically for HS2’s current and future pipeline of direct contracts are publically available via the HS2 Contract Opportunities Table, on the HS2 website. The HS2 Contracts Opportunity Table is a live document which is updated weekly, identifying the procurement status for each contract, including contact details to facilitate dialogue with potential bidders.

Additionally, this shows where organisations have been shortlisted and awarded, ensuring suppliers are appropriately informed regarding procurement and the programmes, and enabling sub Tier 1 contractors a direct access route into organisations that have been awarded work on the HS2 programme.

This level of detail builds upon the Government’s published details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects which shows how the Government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. This steel-specific pipeline complements the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline, which set out over £500 billion worth of planned private and public investment.

Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
UK Border Force: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff were operational at the Border Force (a) Intelligence South East and Europe (Folkestone), (b) Intelligence Hub (Dover), (c) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Sheffield), (d) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Croydon), (e) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Solihull) and (f) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Glasgow) in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 08 August 2017

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

Grouped Questions: 5429
Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
UK Border Force: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many intelligence personnel were employed by Border Force in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 08 August 2017

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

Grouped Questions: 5189
Q
Asked by Kate Hollern
(Blackburn)
Asked on: 22 June 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Tenancy Agreements: Domestic Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to set out the circumstances under which local authorities may exercise discretion in transferring lifetime tenancies for those seeking escape from domestic violence.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017

Domestic abuse is a devastating crime and we are determined to ensure that women, regardless of their circumstances, should receive the support they need when they need it.

Our Manifesto included a commitment to ensure that those who have a lifetime tenancy and flee domestic violence are able to secure a new lifetime tenancy automatically. We are currently working on how we can deliver this, and an announcement will be made in due course.

We have already acted to put measures in place to support victims of domestic abuse. These include the securing of a dedicated fund totalling £40 million over four years (2016 - 2020), building on the £13.5 million provided between 2014 and 2016. The funding will provide provision for refuges and other specialist accommodation-based services to support victims of domestic abuse and service reform. On the 3 November 2016 we published our new ‘Priorities for Domestic Abuse Services’, developed with partners from the domestic abuse sector, which sets out for the first time what local areas need to do to ensure an effective response to meeting the needs of all domestic abuse victims.

Q
Asked by Alex Burghart
(Brentwood and Ongar)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Department for Education
Students: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost of abolishing university tuition fees.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 07 August 2017

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) has estimated that abolishing tuition fees would increase the fiscal deficit for the 2017/18 student cohort by around £11bn, with the long-term cost of student funding increasing by around £6.5bn.

The major reforms to English higher education in 2012 have significantly increased average per-student funding. Graduates do not start repaying loans until their annual incomes reach £21,000, and loans are written off after 30 years.

By enabling English universities to charge current tuition fees, the Government no longer has to ration access to higher education via a cap on student numbers. This enables it to offer more places, including to young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, who are now going to university at a record rate – they are 43% morelikely to go to university 43%more likely to go to university than they were in 2009.*

Graduates earn, on average, substantially more than people with A levels who did not go to university.

Various pieces of research show that Higher Education graduates earn, on average, at least £100,000 more over their lifetimes than those without a degree but with 2 or more A-Levels. The most recent BIS commissioned research shows that, on average, a male graduate could expect to earn £170,000 more and a female graduate £250,000 more over their lifetimes, than someone without a degree but with 2 or more A-levels, net of tax and other costs (2012 prices).

Abolishing tuition fees would be socially regressive: as well as unfairly burdening the general taxpayer, it would benefit mainly those students going on to well-paid jobs, who repay their loans in full.

*https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201617/ldselect/ldsecleg/92/9207.htm

Q
(East Renfrewshire)
Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Antisemitism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions the Government has had with the Scottish Government about the Government's proposals to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017

We have had no discussions with the Scottish Government about that Government’s adoption of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism. However, we welcome the recent decision of the Scottish Government to accept the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism, following discussions between them and the Board of Deputies of British Jews.

Q
Asked by Ms Karen Buck
(Westminster North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Homelessness: Social Rented Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what proportion of nominations to (a) local authorities and (b) registered social landlord properties were homeless households in each of the last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017
Holding answer received on 17 July 2017

DCLG collects information on allocations of social housing through the COntinuous REcording of social housing lettings and sales (CORE). Table 3g of the published summary tables, available at the link below, provides the percentage of all local authority and private registered provider lettings where the tenant had been statutorily homeless prior to the letting. This is broken down for general needs, social and affordable rented and supported housing lettings.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/social-housing-lettings-in-england-april-2015-to-march-2016

Q
(Bolton North East)
Asked on: 13 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Homelessness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent meetings he has had with (a) local authority leaders and (b) charity and voluntary sector representatives to discuss homelessness.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017

Ministers in my department visit a variety of projects, and meet with representatives of local authorities, voluntary and charity sector organisations, policy experts and other partners on a regular basis to discuss a range of issues including homelessness.

The Government publishes a list of all ministerial meetings with external bodies on departmental business on a quarterly basis. This is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dclg-ministerial-data

Q
(Tottenham)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Further Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the implications on individual testing entitlement for her policy of the recommendations of Professor Alison Wolf's report, Remaking Tertiary Education, published in November 2016.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 07 August 2017

We welcome contributions to our thinking from experts on, and from within, the education sector. We are committed to delivering high performing further, technical and higher education, which represents good value for people throughout their lives.

For example, we have legislated to remove the barriers to the provision of two-year degrees. We are also introducing a new maintenance loan for part-time undergraduate study for academic year 2018/19 and intend to offer maintenance loans to support students on further education courses at Levels 4 and 5 in National Colleges and Institutes of Technology. This year’s Spring Budget committed £40million to fund pilots that will test ambitious, new approaches to removing barriers adults might face when considering re-entering education.

Q
(Tottenham)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Mature Students
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to increase the number of individuals aged 24 and over in part-time and full-time education.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 07 August 2017

The Government is committed to ensuring all individuals have the opportunity to make the most of their potential. The Industrial Strategy Green Paper, published in January, outlined some of the challenges that adults face when considering re-entering education. This year’s Budget therefore committed £40million to fund pilots to test ambitious, new approaches to remove these barriers.

We want to increase participation in higher education by older and part-time students, and we have taken action to support those who choose to study part-time. These measures include:

  • From 2012, the offer of up-front fee loans for eligible part-time students, to level the playing field with undergraduate study;
  • From academic year 2018/19, the introduction of undergraduate part-time maintenance loans, to bring greater parity of support between part-time and full-time;
  • From 2015, the relaxation of Equivalent or Lower Qualification rules, so students who already hold an honours degree qualification and wish to study part-time on a second honours degree course in engineering, technology or computer science, have qualified for fee loans for their course. This is being extended for academic year 2017/18 to graduates starting a second part-time honours degree course in any STEM subject.

In addition, we are extending undergraduate maintenance loans to distance learners from academic year 2019/20, subject to the development of a robust control regime.

We are also removing barriers to accelerated courses. Evidence shows that accelerated courses appeal particularly to mature students who want to retrain and enter the workplace more quickly than a traditional course would permit. We have already made provisions in the Higher Education and Research Act 2017 to remove a key barrier to the growth of these courses, and will now consult on implementation and setting a new fee cap specifically for accelerated courses in secondary legislation.

The Office for Fair Access has also asked universities to consider the different barriers mature learners may face in accessing, succeeding in, and progressing from higher education, and to consider what more they can do to attract and support part-time learners across the whole student lifecycle as part of their Access Agreements.

Q
(Tottenham)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Lifelong Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of lifelong learning on (a) economic growth and productivity, (b) unemployment and (c) the health and wellbeing of people involved in lifelong learning.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 07 August 2017

The Government recognises the importance of lifelong learning as a way for individuals to upskill and reskill throughout their lives, letting them access and stay in secure employment in response to labour market shifts such as increasing automation. Allowing workers to respond to these shifts contributes to the country’s economic resilience and productivity. Continuing to learn can also play a role in wellbeing later in life.

Q
Asked by Diana Johnson
(Kingston upon Hull North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 June 2017
Home Office
Fire Prevention: Inspections
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many inspection and enforcement staff have been employed to audit premises under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 in each Fire Safety Authority in England in each year since 2009-10.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The Home Office does not hold information on how many inspection and enforcement staff have been employed to audit premises.

Q
Asked by Diana Johnson
(Kingston upon Hull North)
Asked on: 21 June 2017
Home Office
Fire Prevention: Prosecutions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions each fire safety authority brought prosecutions against persons under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 in each year since 2009-10.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The latest published information on Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 can be found in Table 1202 of the “Fire and rescue authorities: operational statistics bulletin for England 2015 to 2016” available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables

Data for 2009-10 are published in Appendix table 15 accompanying the 2009-10 release here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-and-rescue-authorities-operational-statistics-bulletin-for-england-2009-to-2010

Grouped Questions: 240 | 241
Q
Asked by Diana Johnson
(Kingston upon Hull North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 June 2017
Home Office
Fire Prevention
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) cautions, (b) Alteration Notices, (c) Enforcement Notices and (d) Prohibition Notices under Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 were issued by each Fire Safety Authority in England in each year since 2009-10.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The latest published information on Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 can be found in Table 1202 of the “Fire and rescue authorities: operational statistics bulletin for England 2015 to 2016” available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables

Data for 2009-10 are published in Appendix table 15 accompanying the 2009-10 release here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-and-rescue-authorities-operational-statistics-bulletin-for-england-2009-to-2010

Grouped Questions: 178 | 241
Q
Asked by Diana Johnson
(Kingston upon Hull North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 June 2017
Home Office
Fire Prevention: Inspections
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many inspections of premises under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 were carried out by each Fire Safety Authority in England in each year since 2009-10.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The latest published information on Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 can be found in Table 1202 of the “Fire and rescue authorities: operational statistics bulletin for England 2015 to 2016” available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables

Data for 2009-10 are published in Appendix table 15 accompanying the 2009-10 release here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-and-rescue-authorities-operational-statistics-bulletin-for-england-2009-to-2010

Grouped Questions: 178 | 240
Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
European Cybercrime Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre in each year since that centre's creation.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Grouped Questions: 1721
Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Europol
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many files the UK has sent to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Grouped Questions: 1562
Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Firearms: Liverpool
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that Merseyside Police has the funding necessary to tackle the recent change in the level of gun crime in Liverpool.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The Government takes gun crime very seriously. The legislative controls on firearms have recently been strengthened in the Policing and Crime Act 2017 and we are working with law enforcement partners to reduce the threat posed by gun crime.

We have introduced new offences to tackle the unlawful importation and supply of firearms, and the criminal use of imitation firearms and deactivated weapons. We have committed £2 million over two years to the development of new automatic threat detection technology at the UK Border. A multi-agency firearms unit has also been recently established, led jointly by the National Crime Agency and Counter Terrorism Policing, to coordinate law enforcement activity to disrupt the supply of illegal firearms and improve our understanding of the threat.

We are aware of concerns about gun crime on Merseyside and we are working with Merseyside Police and other partners to understand what lies behind the recent local increases in gun crime and whether there is more to be done to address these issues.

With regard to police funding, the 2015 Spending Review protected overall police spending in real terms. It is a matter for Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners to determine how to use their available resources according to local and national priorities.

Grouped Questions: 1870 | 1872 | 1873
Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Firearms: Merseyside
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to respond to the recent changes in the level of gun crime in Merseyside.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The Government takes gun crime very seriously. The legislative controls on firearms have recently been strengthened in the Policing and Crime Act 2017 and we are working with law enforcement partners to reduce the threat posed by gun crime.

We have introduced new offences to tackle the unlawful importation and supply of firearms, and the criminal use of imitation firearms and deactivated weapons. We have committed £2 million over two years to the development of new automatic threat detection technology at the UK Border. A multi-agency firearms unit has also been recently established, led jointly by the National Crime Agency and Counter Terrorism Policing, to coordinate law enforcement activity to disrupt the supply of illegal firearms and improve our understanding of the threat.

We are aware of concerns about gun crime on Merseyside and we are working with Merseyside Police and other partners to understand what lies behind the recent local increases in gun crime and whether there is more to be done to address these issues.

With regard to police funding, the 2015 Spending Review protected overall police spending in real terms. It is a matter for Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners to determine how to use their available resources according to local and national priorities.

Grouped Questions: 1869 | 1872 | 1873
Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Police: Merseyside
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential effect of the level of 2017 policing budget on police numbers in Merseyside for (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Every Police & Crime Commissioner who maximised their local precept income in 2016-17 and 2017-18 is receiving at least the same direct resource funding in cash than they received in 2015-16. In Merseyside, the PCC is receiving £0.5m more direct resource funding in 2017-18 than in 2015-16.

Decisions about local policing roles and officer numbers are for Chief Constables and PCCs. This discretion and flexibility has allowed for a range of targeted, more resilient approaches tailored to local needs, that is constantly held to account by the people officers serve.

Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Firearms: Liverpool
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent representations she has received from Merseyside Police on tackling gun crime in Liverpool.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The Government takes gun crime very seriously. The legislative controls on firearms have recently been strengthened in the Policing and Crime Act 2017 and we are working with law enforcement partners to reduce the threat posed by gun crime.

We have introduced new offences to tackle the unlawful importation and supply of firearms, and the criminal use of imitation firearms and deactivated weapons. We have committed £2 million over two years to the development of new automatic threat detection technology at the UK Border. A multi-agency firearms unit has also been recently established, led jointly by the National Crime Agency and Counter Terrorism Policing, to coordinate law enforcement activity to disrupt the supply of illegal firearms and improve our understanding of the threat.

We are aware of concerns about gun crime on Merseyside and we are working with Merseyside Police and other partners to understand what lies behind the recent local increases in gun crime and whether there is more to be done to address these issues.

With regard to police funding, the 2015 Spending Review protected overall police spending in real terms. It is a matter for Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners to determine how to use their available resources according to local and national priorities.

Grouped Questions: 1869 | 1870 | 1873
Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Firearms: Liverpool
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the potential effect of changes in funding for Merseyside Police on its capacity to tackle rising gun crime in Liverpool.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The Government takes gun crime very seriously. The legislative controls on firearms have recently been strengthened in the Policing and Crime Act 2017 and we are working with law enforcement partners to reduce the threat posed by gun crime.

We have introduced new offences to tackle the unlawful importation and supply of firearms, and the criminal use of imitation firearms and deactivated weapons. We have committed £2 million over two years to the development of new automatic threat detection technology at the UK Border. A multi-agency firearms unit has also been recently established, led jointly by the National Crime Agency and Counter Terrorism Policing, to coordinate law enforcement activity to disrupt the supply of illegal firearms and improve our understanding of the threat.

We are aware of concerns about gun crime on Merseyside and we are working with Merseyside Police and other partners to understand what lies behind the recent local increases in gun crime and whether there is more to be done to address these issues.

With regard to police funding, the 2015 Spending Review protected overall police spending in real terms. It is a matter for Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners to determine how to use their available resources according to local and national priorities.

Grouped Questions: 1869 | 1870 | 1872
Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the potential effects of changes in the level of funding to Merseyside Fire and Rescue Authority on its ability to respond effectively to large-scale disasters.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Fire and Rescue Authorities have delivered significant savings since 2010.

Fire incidents in Merseyside are down by a third since 2010. Merseyside Fire and Rescue Authority will receive a broadly flat settlement, with core spending power reducing by one percent in cash terms over this spending review period. Merseyside held £28.2 million of non-ringfenced reserves at March 2016, up by £10.4 million since 2010/11.

The Government provides funding and equipment for national resilience capabilities which gives the fire and rescue sector the resources necessary to respond to specific types of large scale incidents. In 2017/18 Merseyside received £0.8 million to support the capabilities they host.

Grouped Questions: 1860
Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Home Office
Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential effect of changes to the level of revenue support grant received by Merseyside Fire and Rescue Authority on its ability to respond effectively to large-scale disasters.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Fire and Rescue Authorities have delivered significant savings since 2010.

Fire incidents in Merseyside are down by a third since 2010. Merseyside Fire and Rescue Authority will receive a broadly flat settlement, with core spending power reducing by one percent in cash terms over this spending review period. Merseyside held £28.2 million of non-ringfenced reserves at March 2016, up by £10.4 million since 2010/11.

The Government provides funding and equipment for national resilience capabilities which gives the fire and rescue sector the resources necessary to respond to specific types of large scale incidents. In 2017/18 Merseyside received £0.8 million to support the capabilities they host.

Grouped Questions: 1859
Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Domestic Appliances: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will commission research into the reasons for the growth in the number of electrical fires.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The number of accidental primary fires in England where the fire and rescue service recorded the ignition power source for the fire as electric decreased from 34,431 in 2010/11 to 30,136 in 2015/16. There are no plans to commission research on this topic.

The number of accidental dwelling fires where the ignition power source was ‘electric’ decreased from 19,603 in 2010/11 to 18,288 in 2014/15. The Home Department has not estimated the costs of these fires.

See fire statistics table FIRE0605. (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables#cause-of-fire)

Grouped Questions: 2124
Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Domestic Appliances: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the cost to the public purse of electrical fires in the home.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

The number of accidental primary fires in England where the fire and rescue service recorded the ignition power source for the fire as electric decreased from 34,431 in 2010/11 to 30,136 in 2015/16. There are no plans to commission research on this topic.

The number of accidental dwelling fires where the ignition power source was ‘electric’ decreased from 19,603 in 2010/11 to 18,288 in 2014/15. The Home Department has not estimated the costs of these fires.

See fire statistics table FIRE0605. (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables#cause-of-fire)

Grouped Questions: 2098
Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Electronic Equipment: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her policy is on the inclusion of (a) mobile phone chargers and (b) e-cigarettes in fire statistics released by her Department.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Mobile phone chargers are currently captured under the category ‘battery charger’ in the Incident Recording System, tablets under the ‘pc’ category and e-cigarettes can be recorded in an ‘other’ category.

Home Office officials have regular discussions with fire and rescue services and other users of fire statistics, including the Fire and Rescue Statistics User Group. Feedback from these groups, including how to best capture new technology, will be used to inform an update of the categories in the Incident Recording System at the next opportunity. Any additions to fire data collections are governed by the Single Data List process to ensure that the burden of any new data collection is considered.

Grouped Questions: 2145 | 2146
Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Electronic Equipment: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with fire and rescue services on the inclusion of (a) mobile phone chargers and (b) e-cigarettes in their incident recording and statistical collation systems.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Mobile phone chargers are currently captured under the category ‘battery charger’ in the Incident Recording System, tablets under the ‘pc’ category and e-cigarettes can be recorded in an ‘other’ category.

Home Office officials have regular discussions with fire and rescue services and other users of fire statistics, including the Fire and Rescue Statistics User Group. Feedback from these groups, including how to best capture new technology, will be used to inform an update of the categories in the Incident Recording System at the next opportunity. Any additions to fire data collections are governed by the Single Data List process to ensure that the burden of any new data collection is considered.

Grouped Questions: 2144 | 2146
Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Fires: Electronic Equipment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what consideration the Fire and Rescue Statistics User Group has given to improving the statistical collation of modern technology incidents and fires from (a) mobile phone chargers, (b) tablets and (c) e-cigarettes.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Mobile phone chargers are currently captured under the category ‘battery charger’ in the Incident Recording System, tablets under the ‘pc’ category and e-cigarettes can be recorded in an ‘other’ category.

Home Office officials have regular discussions with fire and rescue services and other users of fire statistics, including the Fire and Rescue Statistics User Group. Feedback from these groups, including how to best capture new technology, will be used to inform an update of the categories in the Incident Recording System at the next opportunity. Any additions to fire data collections are governed by the Single Data List process to ensure that the burden of any new data collection is considered.

Grouped Questions: 2144 | 2145
Q
Asked by Dawn Butler
(Brent Central)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Football: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to increase representation of black and minority ethnic individuals in the football coaching profession.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Sport England is investing £2 million per year into the Football Association to support their work to enhance the quality and diversity of the coaching workforce in football, including providing bursaries to support women and Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) coaches to develop their coaching abilities from the grassroots to the elite levels of the game.

Coaching across all sports forms a key element of the government's sport strategy, which aims to promote physical and mental wellbeing and individual, community and economic development through sport and physical activity. With 37 per cent of BAME people playing sport once a week but only five per cent of qualified coaches being from BAME backgrounds, Sport England's Coaching Plan for England, published in November 2016, aims to create a more diverse coaching workforce so that more participants are able to be coached by people who are immediately empathetic to their needs and reflective of their social environment.

The coaching plan is available at

https://www.sportengland.org/media/11317/coaching-in-an-active-nation_the-coaching-plan-for-england.pdf.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
EURATOM
Lords
Her Majesty's Government why they propose to withdraw from membership of Euratom.
Answered on: 04 August 2017

Euratom is a separate treaty-based community, it shares a common institutional framework with the EU, including a role for the Commission, the Courts of Justice of the European Union and the Council of Ministers. This makes Euratom and the EU uniquely legally joined. Therefore, on withdrawal from the EU, the UK will also be withdrawing from the Euratom Community. Article 106a of the Euratom Treaty makes Article 50 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union applicable to the Euratom Community in identical terms.

Moving forward, the UK has enjoyed a successful relationship with Euratom for over 40 years and we want that relationship to continue. The shape of the UK’s future relationship with Euratom is subject to negotiations with the EU and our aim, throughout these negotiations, will be to maintain our mutually successful civil nuclear cooperation with Euratom and the rest of the world.

Q
Asked by Mr Steve Reed
(Croydon North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 June 2017
Cabinet Office
Lobbying: Fines
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many organisations have been fined for failing to comply with regulations on third party campaigning set out in the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014.
A
Corrected answer by: Chris Skidmore
Corrected on: 03 August 2017
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 27 June 2017.
The correct answer should have been:

One organisation has been fined for failing to comply with regulations on third party campaigning set out in the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014. The Electoral Commission announced on 19 April 2017 that it had imposed a civil monetary penalty on Greenpeace Ltd, as the organisation did not register with the Electoral Commission at the 2015 General Election. Greenpeace Ltd was fined a total of £30,000.

The rules on third party campaigning at elections are set out in the Political Parties Elections and Referendums Act 2000. These rules were amended by the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014.

Since the amendments made by the 2014 Act came into force, three organisations have been fined by the Electoral Commission. On 19 April 2016, the Electoral Commission announced that it had fined Steve Hart from the Centre for Labour and Social Studies £1100 for failing to deliver two donations reports on time. On 19 April 2017, the Commission announced that it had fined Greenpeace Limited a total of £30,000 and Friends of the Earth Limited £1000. Both organisations did not register with the Electoral Commission at the 2015 UK Parliamentary General Election before spending in excess of the registration threshold.

A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 27 June 2017

One organisation has been fined for failing to comply with regulations on third party campaigning set out in the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014. The Electoral Commission announced on 19 April 2017 that it had imposed a civil monetary penalty on Greenpeace Ltd, as the organisation did not register with the Electoral Commission at the 2015 General Election. Greenpeace Ltd was fined a total of £30,000.

The rules on third party campaigning at elections are set out in the Political Parties Elections and Referendums Act 2000. These rules were amended by the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014.

Since the amendments made by the 2014 Act came into force, three organisations have been fined by the Electoral Commission. On 19 April 2016, the Electoral Commission announced that it had fined Steve Hart from the Centre for Labour and Social Studies £1100 for failing to deliver two donations reports on time. On 19 April 2017, the Commission announced that it had fined Greenpeace Limited a total of £30,000 and Friends of the Earth Limited £1000. Both organisations did not register with the Electoral Commission at the 2015 UK Parliamentary General Election before spending in excess of the registration threshold.

Q
(Central Suffolk and North Ipswich)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Electronic Warfare
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle global cyber terrorism.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 03 August 2017

In November 2016 the Government published a new five year National Cyber Security Strategy, which is supported by £1.9billion of transformational investment which includes a programme of active cyber defence; the creation of the National Cyber Security Centre, and a dedicated ability to counter-attack in cyber space.

The Home Office works closely with both the National Cyber Security Programme and the National Cyber Security Centre to ensure that we have a consistent and joined up understanding of, and approach to the terrorist cyber threat. As set out in the Gracious speech, our counter-terrorism strategy will be reviewed. We will look at our whole counter-terrorism approach across Government, police, local authorities and the security services to ensure they have what they need to protect our country.

Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 29 June 2017
Home Office
Drugs: Counterfeit Manufacturing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) websites have been shut down, (b) goods have been seized, (c) arrests have been made and (d) medicine units have been seized in the UK under Operational Pangea in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The Home Office does not hold this information. INTERPOL releases information annually detailing the total results of Operational Pangea from all participating countries.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 30 June 2017
Home Office
Grenfell Tower: Fires
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if the Government will grant indefinite leave to remain for residents of Grenfell Tower who apply for that status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 August 2017

On 5 July, the Government launched a new scheme to allow individuals who were directly affected by the Grenfell fire to be granted 12 months’ limited leave to remain outside the Immigration Rules if they meet the eligibility requirements.

We believe that 12 months is a reasonable and proportionate timescale to allow individuals to get back on their feet, access the benefits and services they need and consider future options. They will be able to apply for further leave in that time. Individuals who qualify for other forms of leave under the Immigration Rules will be granted leave beyond the 12 month period.

Q
(Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Home Office
Asylum: Accommodation Centres
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her target is for the maximum amount of time asylum seekers spend in initial accommodation; and in what proportion of cases that target has been met since May 2015.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The Home Office aims to move asylum seekers from Initial Accommodation to Dispersed Accommodation within 19 days. However, some asylum seekers stay in Initial Accommodation for shorter or longer periods depending on their individual needs The Home Office closely monitors the length of stay in Initial Accommodation, however historic statistics on the proportion of people who have remained in initial accommodation for longer periods could only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual records.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Home Office
Visas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue was accrued to the public purse from the premium visa service in 2015-16.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The statement of accounts for the Home Office is published on the .GOV.UK website. The annual accounts provide a financial and narrative summary of the activities of the Home Office.

A link to the most recent available data is provided here;

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ho-annual-reports-and-accounts

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

Grouped Questions: 4550
Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Home Office
Visas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue was accrued to the public purse from the premium visa service in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2012-13, (c) 2013-14 and (d) 2014-15.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The statement of accounts for the Home Office is published on the .GOV.UK website. The annual accounts provide a financial and narrative summary of the activities of the Home Office.

A link to the most recent available data is provided here;

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ho-annual-reports-and-accounts

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

Grouped Questions: 4553
Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Home Office
Passports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for (a) passport renewal and (b) a first passport were classified as in progress in each month since January 2017.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The table below contains information on applications that are classed as work in progress. These are applications where Her Majesty’s Passport office is not waiting for a response from the customer.

Applications in Progress

Renewals

First Times

Jan-17

29,695

26,884

Feb-17

41,920

31,695

Mar-17

49,873

38,773

Apr-17

53,389

37,051

May-17

36,495

36,609

Jun-17

65,399

44,561

Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for International Trade
Service Industries: Overseas Trade
Lords
Her Majesty's Government which aspects of the UK's trade in services with non-EU countries are (1) covered by WTO agreements, and (2) not covered by WTO agreements.
A
Answered by: Lord Price
Answered on: 03 August 2017

(1) There are 135 non-EU WTO members. The UK’s trade in services with WTO members is covered by the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). On joining GATS, each WTO Member makes its own specific commitments to providing services market access and non-discriminatory treatment. These commitments are made sector-by-sector. Additionally, eighteen non-EU WTO members have made commitments under the Government Procurement Agreement (GPA) on best-practice procurement procedures and non-discrimination.

(2) GATS does not cover services supplied in the exercise of governmental authority nor services directly related to air transport rights. Both GATS and GPA contain exceptions, for example relating to protection of life or to international emergencies.

Q
Asked by Lord Bird
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Poverty
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how they define, monitor and assess (1) poverty, and (2) the root causes of poverty, in the UK.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 03 August 2017

This Government is committed to an approach that tackles the root causes of poverty and disadvantage. Through Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families, published on 4 April, it published its evidence and analysis on the root causes of disadvantage and the impact they can have on children’s lives. It also set out nine national indicators and underlying measures to track progress in tackling these disadvantages and to drive continued action on improving outcomes for disadvantaged children and families, now and in the future.

The most commonly used measure of poverty is ‘relative low-income’. Estimates on the number and proportion of people in low income are published annually in the ‘Households Below Average Income’ series. It measures how the incomes of one group compare to median incomes in the UK, with those incomes below 60 per cent of the median classified as being in relative low-income.

For more details on the definitions of low income please see the latest Households Below Average Income report attached.

HBAI Report (PDF Document, 815.57 KB)
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Rape: Convictions
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many persons have been convicted of rape in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The number of offenders found guilty of sexual offences, broken down to those found guilty of rape and of other sexual offences, in England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016 can be viewed in the table below.

Offenders found guilty at all courts of sexual offences, England and Wales, 2012 to 2016 (1)(2)

Offence

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

All

5,728

5,665

6,251

6,885

7,511

of which

Rape

1,145

1,121

1,164

1,297

1,352

Others

4,583

4,544

5,087

5,588

6,159

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

Grouped Questions: HL1128
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Sexual Offences: Convictions
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many persons have been convicted of a sexual offence other than rape in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The number of offenders found guilty of sexual offences, broken down to those found guilty of rape and of other sexual offences, in England and Wales, from 2012 to 2016 can be viewed in the table below.

Offenders found guilty at all courts of sexual offences, England and Wales, 2012 to 2016 (1)(2)

Offence

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

All

5,728

5,665

6,251

6,885

7,511

of which

Rape

1,145

1,121

1,164

1,297

1,352

Others

4,583

4,544

5,087

5,588

6,159

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

Grouped Questions: HL1127
Q
Asked by Lord Hain
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Social Security Benefits: EEA Nationals
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what evidence they have, if any, that EEA migrants come to the UK for the specific purpose of claiming benefits.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 03 August 2017

While the Government checks the immigration status of benefit claimants to ensure the benefit is paid properly and to prevent fraud, the Department does not collect information of an individual’s specific purpose for coming to the UK and so this information is not available.

Q
Asked by Lord Hain
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Social Security Benefits: EEA Nationals
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many EEA migrants who have had benefit applications refused have brought a claim to the Social Entitlement Chamber Tribunal in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Baroness Buscombe
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Convention on Choice of Court Agreements
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to become a signatory to the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The UK is currently bound by the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements (2005) by virtue of our membership of the EU. The Government recognises the importance of certainty in civil justice matters, and we are considering carefully the range of international agreements on civil judicial cooperation.

Grouped Questions: HL1145
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Convention on Choice of Court Agreements
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they will make a public statement on whether they intend to become a signatory to the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The UK is currently bound by the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements (2005) by virtue of our membership of the EU. The Government recognises the importance of certainty in civil justice matters, and we are considering carefully the range of international agreements on civil judicial cooperation.

Grouped Questions: HL1144
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Civil Proceedings: Cross Border Cooperation
Lords
Her Majesty's Government when they expect to publish further details about their proposals for future co-operation on civil justice matters with the EU.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 03 August 2017

As the Government’s White Paper makes clear, civil judicial cooperation is an important issue, which underpins the resolution of cross-border disputes in the fields of civil and commercial, and family, law; supports the attractiveness of UK laws and UK courts; and contributes to the UK legal and financial services economies.

The UK intends to keep working with others, including stakeholders, in order to ensure a smooth implementation of future arrangements.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Insulation: Fire Prevention
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they will begin discussions with local authorities on how those authorities should replace any insulation material deemed unsafe with new material that meets both safety and energy conservation standards.
Answered on: 03 August 2017

Immediately after the Grenfell Tower fire, the Government convened a meeting of independent experts, who advised that the immediate priority was a testing programme on Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) cladding on high-rise residential buildings, which is one element of a wall cladding system. Following further advice from the Independent Expert Advisory Panel, the Government has now commissioned the Building Research Establishment to test different wall cladding systems using three common types of ACM panelling with two commonly used types of insulation. The results will provide further evidence of how some commonly used wall systems using ACM perform in a fire. This evidence will be used to produce further advice to inform building owners’ decisions on whether they need to take any additional action to make their building safe.

If owners decide, on the basis of professional advice and in light of further tests results, to remove their cladding and / or insulation, then this needs to be properly planned. In these instances it is even more important that building owners implement the interim measures on fire safety that have been set out by the Department on 22 June 2017 to help ensure the safety of residents during that period.

The Government’s expectation is that landlords will fund measures designed to make a building fire safe, and will draw on their existing resources to do so. Where a local authority has concerns about funding essential fire safety measures, they should approach us as soon as possible to discuss the position. Where works have been advised by local fire services to be essential to ensure the fire safety of a building, we will ensure that current restrictions on the use of financial resources will not prevent them going ahead. This does not include general improvements or enhancements to buildings which go beyond this.

Q
Asked by Lord Jones
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Manufacturing Industries: Staff
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is their estimate of the number of workers employed in the UK in (1) the aerospace industry, and (2) the motor industry.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 03 August 2017

Based on data from the Office for National Statistics in 2016, the Aerospace industry, covering the manufacture, maintenance and repair of aircraft, directly accounted for 120,000 jobs. Automotive Manufacturing accounted for 159,000 jobs and separately recorded, the Wholesale, Retail and Repair of Motor Vehicles accounted for 634,000 jobs.

These figures cover direct employment only excluding indirect jobs that these industries may support in other sectors of the economy, through their supply chains.

Q
Asked by Lord Jones
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for International Trade
Manufacturing Industries: Exports
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is the value of exports from the UK that is accounted for by (1) the areospace industry, and (2) the motor industry.
A
Answered by: Lord Price
Answered on: 03 August 2017

In 2016, the value of UK goods exported by the aerospace industry (CPA category 30.3) was £29.6 billion and by the motor industry (CPA category 29) was £40.1 billion. Data on services exported by the aerospace and motor industries are not available.

Source: ONS UK trade in goods by classification of product by activity (CPA), published 14 June 2017.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Food: Labelling
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to support the food industry through better food labelling (1) before, and (2) after, the UK's withdrawal from the EU.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The Government is fully committed to promoting UK food and drink. The UK led calls for mandatory country of origin labelling on fresh meats and has also argued, within the EU, for country of origin labelling on lightly processed foods, such as some dairy products.

We are considering how to build on existing approaches to help consumers better identify high-quality British food as we leave the EU.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Food Poverty
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they are planning to hold discussions with the governments of (1) the Republic of Ireland, (2) Canada, and (3) the United States, with a view to (a) learning lessons for, and (b) seeking improvements in, the UK's processes for monitoring levels of food insecurity.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

We have no immediate plans to discuss processes for monitoring levels of food insecurity with Republic of Ireland, Canada and the United States. However, the UK Government through the Department for International Development contributes to and supports financially the work of The Food Insecurity Experience Scale (FIES). FIES was developed by the ‘Voices of the Hungry’ project of the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and is used to collect data on household food security in up to 150 countries, including the UK, Republic of Ireland, Canada and the United States.

The UK is also an active participant in the Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) platform established by the G20. AMIS focuses on enhancing global market transparency and improving policy coordination to help prevent unexpected price spikes and thereby strengthen global food security.

The Living Costs and Food Survey, which informs the UK Family Food publication, includes questions on household spend on food, including that of the lowest 20 per cent income households.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Plastics: Recycling
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to (1) reduce waste going to landfill, and (2) increase recycling of plastic cups and bottles.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

As a country we are moving away from landfill to more environmentally beneficial and higher value uses for waste. We are making good progress with diverting waste from landfill with the amount of local authority waste in England going to landfill falling by over 70% between 2000/01 and 2015/16. Landfill tax is the main driver in diverting residual waste from landfill and is currently £86.10 per tonne.

Defra is also investing £3 billion in a number of local authority projects through Waste Infrastructure Grants. This is contributing towards the reduction of waste sent to landfill, promoting renewable energy, recycling and stimulating growth.

England has already achieved a lot in the area of recycling, increasing household recycling from 11% in 2000 to 44% in 2015.

In September 2016, the Waste and Resources Action Programme and an industry advisory group published a framework for greater consistency, encouraging councils to recycle a common set of materials, as well as setting out actions to rationalise packaging, particularly plastics, into items that can be collected for recycling while supporting innovation in packaging design.

Current Packaging policies and regulations have resulted in recycling of packaging rising from around 46% in 2005 to 60% in 2015. We have also announced our intention to increase obligated businesses’ packaging recycling targets to over 75% by 2020. As part of this, we have made great progress in boosting recycling rates for plastic bottles. Their collection for recycling has increased dramatically, from less than 13,000 tonnes in 2000 to over 330,000 tonnes in 2015, and almost all local councils now collect plastic bottles as part of their general waste collection services.

As part of the Litter Strategy for England, published on 10 April, we have established a working group to look at different voluntary and economic incentives to improve recycling and reuse of packaging, and to reduce the incidence of commonly littered items. The working group’s first investigation will consider voluntary models or regulatory options and measures to target drinks containers, including plastic bottles.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Plastics: Recycling
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with business regarding incentives to reduce the use of non-recyclable plastic bottles and cups; and what, if any, such incentives they are planning to introduce.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

Plastic bottles and plastic cups are usually recyclable. More than 45 packaging companies and retailers are working together through the Paper Cup Manifesto to significantly increase paper cup recycling by 2020.

As part of our Litter Strategy we have established a working group to look at potential voluntary and regulatory measures to reduce litter and improve recycling behaviour by consumers. This working group is looking at drinks containers.

Grouped Questions: HL1180
Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Plastics: Recycling
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what incentives they are putting in place in conjunction with manufacturers to deliver wholly recyclable plastic bottles and cups.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

Plastic bottles and plastic cups are usually recyclable. More than 45 packaging companies and retailers are working together through the Paper Cup Manifesto to significantly increase paper cup recycling by 2020.

As part of our Litter Strategy we have established a working group to look at potential voluntary and regulatory measures to reduce litter and improve recycling behaviour by consumers. This working group is looking at drinks containers.

Grouped Questions: HL1179
Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Dogs: Imports
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what enforcement and controls they have put in place on the import of puppies.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

Dogs must be over 15 weeks of age to be imported into the United Kingdom. Those imported from EU Member States are required to have an Intra Trade Animal Health Certificate (ITAHC) and valid pet passport. These documents confirm their health preparation and, along with a microchip, the animals’ identity. Dogs being imported into the UK must have an examination prior to embarkation from an Official Veterinarian (OV). The OV confirms it meets the import requirements of the UK and issues an ITAHC.

Dogs imported from non-EU countries go through a similar process. The health preparation requirements and certification, however, differ according to the disease status of the country of origin.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) carry out risk-based checks on dogs that have been imported into Great Britain. During these checks, APHA ensures that these dogs meet the import requirements. Local authorities are responsible for taking enforcement action when dogs are not compliant with the import rules. Should APHA checks identify that a dog has been imported, but is not compliant with the import rules, the relevant local authority will be informed.

Dogs and puppies moving into the country with their owners must meet the requirements of the pet travel scheme, meaning that they must be accompanied by a pet passport or certificate confirming that they have undergone adequate health preparation to enable them to enter the UK safely.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
South Sudan: Press Freedom
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of South Sudan concerning that government's decision to block Radio Tamazuj and Sudan Tribune.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

Freedom of expression has an essential role to play in the establishment of peace and stability in South Sudan. We are concerned that the block on Radio Tamazuj and the Sudan Tribune remains.

The UK Government condemns the closing of political space and the clamping down on freedom of expression and access to information, which appears to be worsening in South Sudan. We raised our concern over the block on Radio Tamazuj and the Sudan Tribune on 20 July in a statement to the UN Security Council. We have also raised our concerns over the government's actions through two recent joint statements with international partners. We will continue to lobby the government to allow local and international journalists in South Sudan to report without fear of retribution.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
South Sudan: Crimes against Humanity
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the progress made on the establishment of the Hybrid Court in South Sudan; whether they have discussed that issue with the African Union; and if so, when and with what result.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The 2015 Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan mandated the creation of an African Union led Hybrid Court for the prosecution of the most serious crimes in South Sudan.

The UK has called for the Hybrid Court to be established without delay. We continue to urge the African Union to accelerate its implementation, and most recently raised the issue with the African Union High Representative for South Sudan, during a meeting with the Troika (the UK, US and Norway) in June. We also urge the Government of South Sudan to work with the African Union towards its speedy implementation.

We have jointly led a resolution at the Human Rights Council in Geneva, which extended the mandate of the South Sudan Human Rights Commission to gather evidence for eventual use in a court of law.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
South Sudan: Assets
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what steps are being taken by (1) the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and (2) HMRC, to ensure that financial assets held abroad by South Sudanese leaders are subject to appropriate UK and international scrutiny.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The UK took a leading role in securing a UN sanctions regime in 2015 for individuals who pose a threat to peace and stability in South Sudan. We strongly support the sanctioning of individuals where we judge that this can help change behaviour.

We regret that in December 2016 there were not enough votes in the UN Security Council to implement an arms embargo, or designate additional sanctions on key individuals. We will continue to lobby for UN action.

In the meantime, we are working with our EU partners to extend the current EU sanctions regime to include more individuals. We continue to support additional targeted sanctions and an arms embargo.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, with regard to the rights of citizens being negotiated with the EU-27, what progress has been made to date; what are their negotiating red lines; and when they anticipate that those negotiations will conclude.
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The Citizens’ Rights Working Group completed a technical note that maps the alignment between the EU and UK positions, to prioritise future discussions. It can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/joint-technical-note-on-the-comparison-of-eu-uk-positions-on-citizens-rights.

There is much common ground between the UK’s and the EU’s positions on citizens’ rights. We are both clear that we want to protect the broad range of rights and entitlements currently enjoyed by both EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU. However, there are, naturally, points on which our positions differ.

We are making a fair and serious offer, and want to reach a reciprocal agreement as quickly as possible.

Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Cabinet Office
Personal Records: Disclosure of Information
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government has the capacity to provide citizens with all the data it holds on them.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 02 August 2017

Under the Data Protection Act 1998, which is the responsibility of the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, any individual can request the personal data held on them by a public body. Public bodies are required to carry out a reasonable and proportionate search for the requested information. Where the information is in unstructured paper records, then a cost limit applies. Each public body is a separate data controller, and each request is dealt with on an individual basis.

Asked on: 18 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what is their response to the decision by the High Court of Hong Kong to disqualify four democratically elected members of the Legislative Council; and what representations they are making to the government of China regarding that case.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

In November 2016 the Government expressed concern at the decision by the National People's Congress Standing Committee to express its interpretation of the Basic Law before the conclusion of legal proceedings in Hong Kong against two legislators-elect regarding the validity of their oath-taking.

The four cases referred to are a matter for the Hong Kong Courts. We understand that the legislators may appeal against this judgement. It would therefore not be appropriate to comment on what is an ongoing legal matter. We will continue to follow developments closely.

Q
Asked by Lord Kinnock
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by Baroness Anelay of St Johns on 13 July (HLWS43), what are (1) the UK obligations to the EU, and (2) the EU obligations to the UK, "that will survive the UK's withdrawal"; and how they intend to resolve those obligations.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The terms of the UK’s departure from the EU will depend on negotiations with the EU and other Member States. There is no established precedent for leaving the EU.

We are focussed on securing the best possible deal for the United Kingdom as we leave the European Union.

The UK is a country that meets its international obligations and we will work with the EU to determine a fair settlement of the UK’s rights and obligations as a departing Member State, in accordance with the law and in the spirit of our continuing partnership.

Q
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to Turkish authorities to seek the release of Idil Eser, the director of Amnesty International's Turkish branch.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

We are very concerned by the arrest on 5 July and remanding in custody of Amnesty International's Turkey Director Idil Eser and five other human rights defenders in Turkey. We also remain deeply concerned at the detention of Taner Kilic, Amnesty International's Turkey Chair. The Foreign Secretary urged their release in his speech in Sydney on 27 July. As the Minister for Europe and the Americas set out in his recent statement on these arrests, both the Foreign Secretary and the Prime Minister have raised these arrests in recent discussions with Turkish counterparts. He has also raised the matter with the Turkish Ambassador to London. We continue to urge the Turkish authorities to uphold international standards with regard to the rule of law, including the presumption of innocence, and to protect fundamental rights including freedom of expression and assembly.

Q
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they have had any discussions with the government of United States with regard to the Paris Agreement on climate change and the US's intention to withdraw, since President Trump's press conference with President Macron on 13 July.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

Officials at the British Embassy in Washington have regular discussions with representatives of the US Administration on a range of issues, including climate change.

Q
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have hade with the government of India and the government of China to help to defuse current tensions on the Dolam Plateau.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

We are monitoring developments in the Doklam region closely. The Minister for Asia and the Pacific raised it with the Indian High Commissioner on 19 July, and UK officials have recently discussed it with the Government of China. Both expressed concern and the UK's hope that India and China reach a peaceful resolution.

We call on all parties to exercise restraint and ensure channels of dialogue remain open as a means to resolving differences.

Asked on: 18 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to prepare for the 2018 UN High Level Conference on Disarmament.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Government firmly believes that the best way to achieve a world without nuclear weapons is through gradual multilateral disarmament negotiated using a step by step approach and within the framework of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. We will consider our approach to the 2018 UN High Level Conference closer to the time.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department of Health
NHS Property Services: Income
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the income was of NHS Property Services Ltd in each of the last three years.
A
Corrected answer by: Mr Philip Dunne
Corrected on: 02 August 2017
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 24 July 2017.
The correct answer should have been:

A summary of income extracted from the audited accounts for NHS Property Services for the financial years 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 is set out in the following table.

Year ending 31 March 2015 (£ million)

Year ending 31 March 2016 (£ million)

Year ending 31 March 2017 (£ million)

Income

746

685

685 792

A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 24 July 2017

A summary of income extracted from the audited accounts for NHS Property Services for the financial years 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 is set out in the following table.

Year ending 31 March 2015 (£ million)

Year ending 31 March 2016 (£ million)

Year ending 31 March 2017 (£ million)

Income

746

685

685 792

Q
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
UK Relations with EU
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, what is their assessment of the reported comments made by the City of London’s special representative to the EU, Jeremy Browne, that the government of France is seeking the weakening of Britain and the City of London; and what action they are taking to ensure that EU member states maintain good relations with the UK and the City of London following Brexit.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

We are going to make the most of the opportunities that leaving the EU presents. We recognise that the City is a global centre of excellence in finance, corporate law and insurance, which EU companies will wish to continue to access. We will be aiming to maintain the City's leading position as one of the key centres of global finance.

The government is keenly aware of the importance of the financial services sector to the UK economy. The government has set out its intention to pursue a bold and ambitious free trade agreement with the European Union, and for that agreement to be of greater scope and ambition than any such agreement before it so that it covers sectors crucial to our linked economies such as financial services.

Our focus is on working closely with our EU partners to negotiate a successful outcome and the best deal for the UK and the EU. We are confident that such an outcome is in the interests of both sides.

Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
EU Immigration: Migrant Workers
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what proposals they have to protect the acquired rights of (1) European Union and (2) United Kingdom cross-border and cross-frontier workers, when entering the EU post-Brexit from (a) the UK, (b) Gibraltar, and (c) the Crown dependencies.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

We recognise that frontier workers enjoy rights under EU law. We are considering in detail the EU proposals for current frontier workers and will share more detail on our position in due course.

As stated in the joint technical note on the comparison of EU-UK positions on citizens' rights, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/631038/Joint_technical_note_on_the_comparison_of_EU-UK_positions_on_citizens__rights.pdf, the UK will consider making reciprocal arrangements for EU citizens in Britain and UK nationals in Europe.

Q
Asked by Lord Adonis
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
UK Joint Delegation to NATO
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what was the total cost of the Office of the UK's Permanent Representative to NATO in 2016-17.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

​The 'Cost of Post' to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) for the UK Delegation to NATO in Brussels in Financial Year 2016-17 was £2,953,128. This figure represents the Total Direct Expenditure including Management and Support activity.

Q
Asked by Lord Adonis
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
UK Joint Delegation to NATO
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, as at 1 July, how many staff were attached to the UK Permanent Representation to NATO.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

There are 18 FCO UK-based members of staff and five FCO Locally Engaged members of staff working in UKDel NATO.

The Ministry of Defence also supports 18 military personnel and 10 civilian staff in the joint Delegation.

Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Building Regulations
Lords
Her Majesty's Government which parts of the building regulations they intend to review; when this review will commence; and to what timetable.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Government announced on 28 July that, following the Grenfell Tower tragedy, Dame Judith Hackitt will chair an independent review to examine current building regulations and fire safety with a particular focus on high rise residential buildings. It will report jointly to the Communities Secretary and the Home Secretary, and will examine:

  • the regulatory system around the design, construction and on-going management of buildings in relation to fire safety;
  • related compliance and enforcement issues;

  • international regulation and experience in this area.

Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Service Industries: UK Trade with EU
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of relying on agreements under the WTO for trade with the EU27 should an agreement with the EU not be reached by April 2019 in the following services sectors: (1) financial services, (2) professional business services, (3) digital services, (4) creative services, (5) air services, (6) tourism, (7) education, and (8) health-related travel services.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Department for Exiting the EU is working with officials across government and undertaking a programme of analytical work to assess the economic impacts of exiting the European Union across a range of scenarios.

As part of our analysis we are looking at more than 50 sectors within the areas of goods; services; financial services; network industries; and agriculture and fisheries as well as cross-cutting regulations. This will inform the UK's position for the negotiations with our EU partners.

However, Parliament has asked the Government to protect information that could undermine the UK's negotiating position and the Government will respect this.

Q
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Radioisotopes: Imports
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what terms they are seeking to agree with the European Union to ensure that no additional delays or restrictions are placed on imports of molybdenum-99 to the UK following the UK's departure from Euratom.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The UK’s ability to import medical isotopes from Europe and the rest of the world will not be affected by withdrawal from Euratom.

The import or export of medical radioisotopes, including molybdenum-99 is not subject to any Euratom licensing requirements.These isotopes are governed and regulated under the Euratom framework; however, Euratom places no restrictions on the export of medical isotopes to countries outside the EU.

It is in everyone’s interest to not disrupt the timely access of treatment to patients; and to ensure that cross-border trade with the EU and Euratom is as frictionless as possible.

Q
Asked by Lord Empey
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Libya: Politics and Government
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whom they recognise as the legitimate government of Libya.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The UK remains committed to the Government of National Accord and the Libyan Political Agreement (LPA). An inclusive political deal negotiated within the framework of the LPA is the best way of stabilising Libya. We continue to work in support of the Libyan Political Agreement framework through our discussions with Libyan parties, and by working with our international partners and the UN Special Representative of the Secretary General.

Q
Asked by Lord Empey
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Libya: Terrorism
Lords
Her Majesty's Government when they last held discussions with the government of Libya about compensation for UK victims of weapons supplied by Colonel Gaddafi to the IRA; and what was the outcome of those discussions.
A
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Foreign Secretary raised the issue of compensation for the victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism during his meeting with Prime Minister Serraj in Tripoli on 4 May 2017. He emphasised again the importance the UK places on this issue and encouraged the Libyan authorities to engage with UK victims' groups and their representatives. Prime Minister Serraj expressed sympathy with those who had suffered from the previous regime, but it was also clear from his discussion with the Foreign Secretary that the Libyan Government continues to face numerous challenges and that progress on the issue of compensation is likely to remain slow. We continue to make clear to the Libyan authorities that this is a priority issue for the UK.

Q
Asked by Baroness Gale
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department of Health
Parkinson's Disease
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to improve access to timely and appropriate support for people with Parkinson's disease who are experiencing anxiety or depression.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 02 August 2017

As set out in Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health the expansion of Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services will focus on people with long term conditions, including neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s, and/or medically unexplained symptoms. New psychological therapy provision will see physical and mental health care provision co-located. Therapy will be integrated into existing medical pathways and services – either primary care, or secondary care services including neurology.

Although the majority of people with Parkinson’s can be cared for through routine access to primary and secondary care, NHS England commissions the specialised elements of Parkinson’s care that patients may receive from 24 specialised neurological treatment centres across England. Within these centres neurological multidisciplinary teams ensure patients can access a range of health professionals, including neurologists, neurosurgeons, clinical nurse specialists, psychologists, and that they can receive specialised treatment and support, according to their needs.

The Neurology Advisory Group will ensure that there is system alignment and a national approach when considering the recommendations, which will be of benefit to patients.

NHS England is also working with the Neurological Alliance, following the publication on 5 July 2017 of their report on mental health and neurological conditions, Parity of esteem for people affected by neurological conditions: meeting the emotional, cognitive & mental health needs of neurology patients.

A copy of the report is attached.

Q
Asked by Lord Hain
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Home Office
Exclusion Orders: EEA Nationals
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many EEA nationals were prevented from entering the UK on the grounds of (1) public policy, (2) public security, and (3) public health, in each of the last five years, under the derogations provided for by Article 27 of the Citizens' Rights Directive 2004/38/EC.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

Due to the way in which data is recorded for the refusal of admission of European Economic Area nationals, it is not possible to provide figures on refusals by reason of public policy, public security and public health


To establish this information would incur a disproportionate cost as it would involve the examination of individual records.

Q
Asked by Lord Hain
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Home Office
Deportation: EEA Nationals
Lords
Her Majesty's Government how many EEA nationals were deported from the UK on the grounds of (1) public policy, (2) public security, and (3) public health, in each of the last 5 years, under the derogations provided for by Article 27 of the Citizens' Rights Directive 2004/38/EC.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Home Office does not hold the data requested.

Data on the number of EU nationals returned by type are published by the Home Office. The latest 12 months Q3 2016 to Q1 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Year

Total enforced returns

Enforced removals

Other returns from detention

Voluntary returns (excluding returns from detention)

Assisted returns

Controlled returns

Other verified returns

Total refused entry at port and subsequently departed

2016 Q3

1,259

1,215

44

211

0

189

22

516

2016 Q4

1,299

1,222

77

202

0

181

21

606

2017 Q1

1,475

1,339

136

180

0

165

15

801

Table: Returns of EU nationals by type. Information has been extracted from rt_02q of the Returns tables of the latest Immigration Stats release, https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/615156/returns1-jan-mar-2017-tables.ods

Q
Asked by Lord Hain
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Home Office
Free Movement of Labour
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what analysis they have conducted on the impact of restricting the EU right to free movement to those who already hold a job in the UK.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

There are a number of options as to how EU migration might work once we have left the EU. We are considering various options and it would be wrong to set out further positions at this stage.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
EU Action: Parliamentary Scrutiny
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, for each government department, from January to June, on how many occasions the Scrutiny Reserve Resolution was overridden in (1) the House of Lords, and (2) the House of Commons; and in respect of how many documents an override occurred in (a) both Houses, (b) the House of Lords, and (c) the House of Commons.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

Between January and June 2017, 476 EU proposals and other documents were submitted for scrutiny.

Across both Houses there were 66 occasions when the Government supported decisions in the EU Council of Ministers before the scrutiny procedures had been completed by either one or both Scrutiny Committees.

In each case the Government explained to the Scrutiny Committees why it was important for the proposal to be supported before clearance had been provided. This period of reporting coincided with the dissolution of Parliament where between the prorogation of Parliament between 27 April and 30 June there was no opportunity for scrutiny by the Commons European Scrutiny Committee and the Committee has yet to be reappointed in the new Parliament. However, Lord Boswell of Aynho was reappointed as Chair of the Lords European Union Committee on 21 June and began considering EU documents and EMs submitted to the Committee on 27 June. As with previous six-monthly periods, the largest category of instrument was fast-moving and sensitive CFSP and EU restrictive measures where there were 29 such instruments adopted before scrutiny could be completed. There was also a package of 27 measures on which HM Treasury submitted EMs on the 2017 National Reform Programmes of Member States other than Greece, which were endorsed by Heads of Government at the June European Council without the opportunity for clearance by either Scrutiny Committee.

The figures requested are set out below:

Department

(1) & (b). House of Lords Override

(2) & (c). House of Commons override

(a). No. of overrides in both Houses

Total no. of overrides

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

1

2

1

2

Culture, Media and Sport

1

1

1

1

Communities and Local Government

1

1

1

1

Foreign and Commonwealth Office*

24

31

24

31

HM Treasury

27

30

27

30

Home Office

1

1

1

1

Totals

55

66

55

66


* In addition to the formal overrides listed here, there were 20 occasions when Council Decisions were adopted prior to scrutiny by the House of Commons European Scrutiny Committee due to their limité marking (ie. internal EU limited distribution marking for content not intended to be in the public domain).

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Insulation: Fire Prevention
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to revise building regulations in the light of tests carried out by the Building Research Establishment on three different types of aluminium composite material cladding combined with different types of insulation; and if so, when.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Government announced on 28 July that, following the Grenfell Tower tragedy, Dame Judith Hackitt will chair an independent review to examine current building regulations and fire safety with a particular focus on high rise residential buildings. It will report jointly to the Communities Secretary and the Home Secretary, and will examine:

  • the regulatory system around the design, construction and on-going management of buildings in relation to fire safety;

  • related compliance and enforcement issues;

  • international regulation and experience in this area.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Insulation: Fire Prevention
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the difference between (1) the tests that their Expert Advisory Panel commissioned from the Building Research Establishment following the Grenfell Tower fire, and (2) tests conducted by the building industry which informed decisions relating to the refurbishment of that block.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

We cannot comment on issues specifically related to Grenfell Tower, as these are matters for the public inquiry and the on-going police investigation.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Insulation: Fire Prevention
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made as to why those responsible for fire safety within the building industry did not carry out the tests that their Expert Advisory Panel commissioned from the Building Research Establishment following the Grenfell Tower fire on the performance of three different types of aluminium composite material cladding combined with different types of insulation material.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

We cannot comment on tests that have been carried out independently to the current Building Research Establishment testing programme commissioned by the Expert Panel. The Industry has acknowledged that it needs to help co-ordinate the construction industry’s response to the challenges of implementing recommendations from the Expert Advisory Panel and Government. An Industry Response Group has been established to take this forward.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Insulation: Fire Prevention
Lords
Her Majesty's Government on how many occasions they were formally approached by (1) academics, and (2) other persons or bodies, requesting that they conduct additional tests on the flammability of the cladding added to high rise buildings such as Grenfell Tower when used in combination with different types of insulation; and whether they intend to revise the guidance relating to such tests and processes.
Answered on: 02 August 2017

The Department has received representations from a number of bodies about the tests which have been carried out on cladding, and now cladding and insulation installed on high rise buildings. The Government’s approach to these tests is set out in the most recent explanatory note, which can be found (attached) here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/explanatory-note-on-safety-checks-and-testing

Explanatory note on safety checks (PDF Document, 352.16 KB)
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