Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
Asked by Jon Trickett
(Hemsworth)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Department for Communities and Local Government: Redundancy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2017 to Question 3360 on redundancy, how much of the £15,805,000 paid in redundancy payments was paid to (a) men and (b) women.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Total exit packages agreed by the Department for Communities and Local Government and its Agencies and NDPBs in 2015-16.

Male: 147

Female: 175

Total: 322

Under the Civil Service Compensation Scheme rules, there is a very clear formula that must be followed when setting the exit package for a member of staff.

In 2015/16, in line with the scheme rules, staff -

  • Received 4 weeks’ pay for every year of reckonable service, up to a maximum of 21 years.

  • Compensation was based on final FTE salary.

  • Reckonable service for part time workers would be based on actual hours worked during part time periods (Qualifying service x Actual hours worked / Full time hours).

Male (£)

Female (£)

Total (£)

Cost of Exit Packages agreed by core Department and its agencies and NDPBs in 2015/16

£7,933,500.00

£7,871,500.00

£15,805,000.00


The table below shows the average time spent in service at each grade for those that left on voluntary exit.

Grade

Male

Average Time in CS

Female

Average Time in CS

AO

4

17

4

15

EO

15

28

32

23

HEO

18

25

29

22

SEO

15

19

21

19

G7

21

26

28

18

G6

13

22

6

19

SCS

4

12

2

26

Total

90

23

122

20

Grouped Questions: 8372
Q
Asked by Jon Trickett
(Hemsworth)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Department for Communities and Local Government: Redundancy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2017 to Question 3360 on redundancy, how many of the 322 exits negotiated by the departmental group were for (a) men and (b) women.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Total exit packages agreed by the Department for Communities and Local Government and its Agencies and NDPBs in 2015-16.

Male: 147

Female: 175

Total: 322

Under the Civil Service Compensation Scheme rules, there is a very clear formula that must be followed when setting the exit package for a member of staff.

In 2015/16, in line with the scheme rules, staff -

  • Received 4 weeks’ pay for every year of reckonable service, up to a maximum of 21 years.

  • Compensation was based on final FTE salary.

  • Reckonable service for part time workers would be based on actual hours worked during part time periods (Qualifying service x Actual hours worked / Full time hours).

Male (£)

Female (£)

Total (£)

Cost of Exit Packages agreed by core Department and its agencies and NDPBs in 2015/16

£7,933,500.00

£7,871,500.00

£15,805,000.00


The table below shows the average time spent in service at each grade for those that left on voluntary exit.

Grade

Male

Average Time in CS

Female

Average Time in CS

AO

4

17

4

15

EO

15

28

32

23

HEO

18

25

29

22

SEO

15

19

21

19

G7

21

26

28

18

G6

13

22

6

19

SCS

4

12

2

26

Total

90

23

122

20

Grouped Questions: 8371
Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 06 September 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Travellers: Caravan Sites
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many affordable residential pitches have been (a) started and (b) completed in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The table below shows the number of new affordable residential traveller pitches (a) started and (b) completed in each of the last five financial years. Delivery during this period was recorded under the 2011-15 Traveller Pitch Funding programme and the 2015-18 Affordable Homes Programme.


2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17

a - started pitches 112 240 196 9* 34*


b - completed pitches 4 39 420 52 36*

* Relate to 15-18 AHP

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 06 September 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Travellers: Caravan Sites
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many (a) starts and (b) completions have occurred for Gypsy and Traveller sites under the Affordable Homes Programme 2015-18 in each local authority area.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The table below shows the number of new affordable residential pitches (a) started and (b) completed on traveller sites in each local authority area under the 2015-18 Affordable Homes Programme. All other local authority areas not listed in this table show a nil-return.

Local Authority

a) Started pitches

b) Completed pitches

Central Bedfordshire

2

2

Darlington

22

22

Harlow

12

12

Solihull

7

0

Total

43

36*

*36 total relates to the total amount of completed pitches in the programme of the 2015-18 Affordable Homes programme.

Q
Asked by Cat Smith
(Lancaster and Fleetwood)
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register: Disclosure of Information
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the timetable is to bring forward proposals to improve data-sharing in the voter registration process.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Electoral Returning Officers (EROs) already have wide powers to access data to improve
the quality of the register. The Cabinet Office is working with administrators and their
representatives and the Electoral Commission to investigate additional potential use of
data to aid EROs in their registration duties.

Q
Asked by Cat Smith
(Lancaster and Fleetwood)
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will conduct a review of all election and electoral registration deadlines which includes the consideration of deadlines for the registration of electors, overseas electors and absent voting.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Government keeps elections processes and policy under review and Cabinet Office
officials are actively discussing timetables and other processes with the Association of
Electoral Administrators and the Electoral Commission to understand the issues and
identify practicable solutions that put electors first.

Q
Asked by Cat Smith
(Lancaster and Fleetwood)
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Cabinet Office
Elections: ICT
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the (a) current use of electronic forms of electoral counting and (b) potential merits of introducing such electronic forms of counting for other types of elections.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Electronic counting is used in only a small number of polls. However, in considering
whether to extend the use of electronic counting, we would need to take into account the
cost, accuracy and integrity of adopting it more widely. In previous polls electronic counting
has been more expensive and has not been as quick as expected in some circumstances

We therefore currently have no plans to further its use.

Q
Asked by Norman Lamb
(North Norfolk)
Asked on: 14 September 2017
Cabinet Office
Cabinet Office: Government Chief Scientific Adviser
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings he has had with the Government Chief Scientific Adviser in the last three months.
A
Answered by: Damian Green
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The First Secretary has not had meetings with the Government Chief Scientific Adviser in
the last three months.

Q
Asked on: 02 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prison Service: Recruitment
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions the Secretary of State for Justice has had with the Prison Officers' Association regarding recruitment and retention in the Prison Service, and when he next plans to meet staff representatives.
A
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Much communication has taken place between the Secretary of State and the Prison Officers’ Association through written correspondence. The Secretary of State spoke with the POA on 21 June 2017 and met with them on 29 June 2017 to discuss several important subjects, including Prison Officer recruitment and retention.

The Prisons Minister also plans to meet with the POA on 23 October 2017.

Q
Asked on: 02 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prison and Probation Service: Mental Health Services
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment the Secretary of State for Justice has made of the current provision of mental health assessments and treatment in the prison and probation systems.
A
Answered on: 20 October 2017

We take mental health provision very seriously and are committed to working closely with health partners to ensure that offenders are assessed at the appropriate time and are able to access the treatment and support required for their mental health needs.

Health services in English prisons are commissioned by NHS England. In the community, NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups are responsible for commissioning health services, including mental health services, for the general population in their locality, including offenders on probation. NHS England are responsible for making assessments of the current provision of mental health assessments and treatment in the prison systems in England. We are committed to working closely with them to support this responsibility.

Mental Health is devolved to the Welsh Government and NHS Wales. Local Health Boards are commissioned to deliver these services in public sector prisons in Wales, which includes mental health assessments and treatment. There are separate arrangements for the private prison HMP Parc.

Q
(Cambridge)
Asked on: 06 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Community Plant Variety Office: National Institute of Agricultural Botany
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what talks he has had with the EU Commission to ensure that the Community Plant Variety Office continues commissioning variety testing contracts to the National Institute of Agricultural Botany after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The issue of the CPVO and their commissioning was discussed with the Commission on 26 September. Future arrangements for plant variety testing will be subject to negotiation with the EU.

Q
(Gainsborough)
Asked on: 06 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
National Holocaust Memorial Centre and Learning Service
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions the Government had with Historic England on the proposal to build the Holocaust Memorial and Holocaust Learning Centre in Victoria Tower Gardens (a) before the site was announced and (b) subsequently; on what dates those discussions were held; and what observations Historic England has made of that proposal.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Historic England was consulted in August and September 2016 (ahead of the launch of the design competition in September 2016). They have subsequently played a formal role providing detailed input to the design competition assessing the design proposals, presenting to the shortlisted design teams at a site briefing session in November 2016 and contributing to the meetings of the Competition Jury’s Supporting Panel in February and March 2017.

Historic England’s role in the Supporting Panel was to help the Jury identify those proposals which have effectively acknowledged the heritage significance and its policy context, and conversely those which do not appear to have done so or where significant doubts or uncertainties remain.

The UK Holocaust Memorial Foundation also provided a briefing to the UNESCO Mission to Westminster in February 2017.

Q
(North East Fife)
Asked on: 06 October 2017
Home Office
British National (Overseas): Passports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many valid British National Overseas passports are currently in issue.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The number of valid British National Overseas passports in circulation as of 31 of December 2016 was 152,351.

Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Prior of Brampton on 15 February (HL5165), what are the greenhouse gas emissions targets, broken down by local authority; and what assessment they have made of progress against each of those targets over the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Local Authorities are not mandated to have greenhouse gas emissions reductions targets. However, many cities and places have set their own targets following the Paris Agreement. Over 30 places are members of international agreements such as the Covenant of Mayors and, within the UK, over 70 places have now signed up to UK100 with a political commitment to use 100% clean energy by 2050.

The Government has recently announced support for every Local Enterprise Partnership to develop their own energy strategy and we are developing plans to support local places to build the capacity to deliver more local low carbon projects across England over the next two years.

Asked on: 09 October 2017
Department for Education
Department for Education: Food
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total amount of food waste generated by DfE offices for each of the last five years.
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The amount of waste disposed of by composting or anaerobic digestion over each of the last five years was as follows:

  • 2012-13: 25 tonnes
  • 2013-14: 16 tonnes
  • 2014-15: 24 tonnes
  • 2015-16: 17 tonnes
  • 2016-17: 15 tonnes

The majority of this was food waste (which includes inedible waste such as fruit peel and coffee grounds) but also includes other compostable waste such as tissue paper.

Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Home Office
Domestic Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many incidents of domestic violence were reported to police authorities in England and Wales in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Office for National Statistics publishes information on the number of incidents of domestic abuse recorded by the police. This information is published in a cross government statistical bulletin ‘Domestic abuse in England and Wales: year ending March 2016’, which can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/domesticabuseinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2016

Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 09 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the monthly cost to the public purse is of the delay in the roll-out of the new Emergency Services Network for (a) charges to Airwave and (b) any other costs.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Any delay in rollout impacts the date by when the savings from ESN will start to be realised. These savings will represent 50% of the cost of Airwave. The cost of delay is therefore the opportunity cost of not being able to realise the cost savings of ESN sooner.

Up to the end of 2016/17, the Programme has already delivered £77m of cash releasing benefits on existing Airwave contracts. These are benefits that would not have been obtained under the previous contractual agreements.

Q
Asked by Lord Tebbit
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Detainees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many UK citizens are currently held in prisons in England and Wales (1) in detention without charge, and (2) without a date set for trial; and how many non-UK EU citizens are similarly detained.
A
Answered on: 20 October 2017

UK citizens are not normally detained in prison without charge. The number of UK citizens on remand awaiting trial as of 30 June 2017 was 5,242. It is not possible to state the numbers of these individuals who do not have a date set for trial because this data is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Individuals who are subject to extradition for charges brought by other jurisdictions can be held in prison pending extradition. As at 30 June 2017, the number of people in prison pending extradition was 105, of which 84 were non-UK EU nationals.

Foreign National Offenders (FNOs) who have served a sentence may continue to be held in prison beyond their sentence end date under immigration powers pending removal from the United Kingdom. As at 30 June 2017, the number of FNOs held in prison under immigration powers was 448 (including 122 non-UK EU nationals).

The Government is absolutely committed to increasing the number of FNOs removed from our prisons, and any foreign national who comes to our country and is sentenced to prison should be in no doubt of our determination to deport them. Increasing removals is one of our top priorities and all FNOs sentenced to custody are referred to the Home Office at the earliest opportunity to be considered for deportation.

Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Airwave Service
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of whether it will be possible to extend Airwave beyond March 2020.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. There will be no risks with public safety and there will be no gap in the emergency services’ communications provision. It will ultimately be for the emergency services themselves to confirm they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

The Airwave network will remain operational until the emergency services have transitioned to using the new Emergency Services Network.

The current agreement with Motorola can be extended equally for a fixed price per region per month. The regional extension price enables the Government to only buy additional Airwave service for those regions requiring the service for longer. In terms of funding of future ASL contract extensions falling to the police service in England and Wales, these decisions will be subject to ministerial consideration at that time as part of the annual police finance settlement.

In respect of costs to police forces I can confirm that the Home Office contributes 75% of the costs of setting up and operating the core network element of ESN to reflect the policing (England and Wales) share of the joint emergency service programme. This share of Core costs is met through a reallocation within the police funding settlement. Police & Crime Commissioners will meet certain local costs, such as new handsets for officers, from their general budgets as they do now.

This is cutting-edge technology, and the Programme has always been clear that it will not take any risks with public safety. The emergency services will transition when they consider the network ready. Greater clarity on the date ESN will be available is likely to be understood by the end of the year.

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Grouped Questions: 107020 | 106980 | 106960 | 106849 | 106850
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government plans to commence the transition from Airwave to ESMCP in December 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. There will be no risks with public safety and there will be no gap in the emergency services’ communications provision. It will ultimately be for the emergency services themselves to confirm they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

The Airwave network will remain operational until the emergency services have transitioned to using the new Emergency Services Network.

The current agreement with Motorola can be extended equally for a fixed price per region per month. The regional extension price enables the Government to only buy additional Airwave service for those regions requiring the service for longer. In terms of funding of future ASL contract extensions falling to the police service in England and Wales, these decisions will be subject to ministerial consideration at that time as part of the annual police finance settlement.

In respect of costs to police forces I can confirm that the Home Office contributes 75% of the costs of setting up and operating the core network element of ESN to reflect the policing (England and Wales) share of the joint emergency service programme. This share of Core costs is met through a reallocation within the police funding settlement. Police & Crime Commissioners will meet certain local costs, such as new handsets for officers, from their general budgets as they do now.

This is cutting-edge technology, and the Programme has always been clear that it will not take any risks with public safety. The emergency services will transition when they consider the network ready. Greater clarity on the date ESN will be available is likely to be understood by the end of the year.

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Grouped Questions: 107019 | 106980 | 106960 | 106849 | 106850
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of whether there will be a gap between the complete roll out of the Emergency Services Network and the shutdown of the Airwave system.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. There will be no risks with public safety and there will be no gap in the emergency services’ communications provision. It will ultimately be for the emergency services themselves to confirm they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

The Airwave network will remain operational until the emergency services have transitioned to using the new Emergency Services Network.

The current agreement with Motorola can be extended equally for a fixed price per region per month. The regional extension price enables the Government to only buy additional Airwave service for those regions requiring the service for longer. In terms of funding of future ASL contract extensions falling to the police service in England and Wales, these decisions will be subject to ministerial consideration at that time as part of the annual police finance settlement.

In respect of costs to police forces I can confirm that the Home Office contributes 75% of the costs of setting up and operating the core network element of ESN to reflect the policing (England and Wales) share of the joint emergency service programme. This share of Core costs is met through a reallocation within the police funding settlement. Police & Crime Commissioners will meet certain local costs, such as new handsets for officers, from their general budgets as they do now.

This is cutting-edge technology, and the Programme has always been clear that it will not take any risks with public safety. The emergency services will transition when they consider the network ready. Greater clarity on the date ESN will be available is likely to be understood by the end of the year.

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Grouped Questions: 107019 | 107020 | 106960 | 106849 | 106850
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to exercise the provision in the Airwave emergency services contracts to extend the contracts beyond the national shut down target date of 31 December 2019; and what estimate she has made of the monthly cost of exercising that provision.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. There will be no risks with public safety and there will be no gap in the emergency services’ communications provision. It will ultimately be for the emergency services themselves to confirm they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

The Airwave network will remain operational until the emergency services have transitioned to using the new Emergency Services Network.

The current agreement with Motorola can be extended equally for a fixed price per region per month. The regional extension price enables the Government to only buy additional Airwave service for those regions requiring the service for longer. In terms of funding of future ASL contract extensions falling to the police service in England and Wales, these decisions will be subject to ministerial consideration at that time as part of the annual police finance settlement.

In respect of costs to police forces I can confirm that the Home Office contributes 75% of the costs of setting up and operating the core network element of ESN to reflect the policing (England and Wales) share of the joint emergency service programme. This share of Core costs is met through a reallocation within the police funding settlement. Police & Crime Commissioners will meet certain local costs, such as new handsets for officers, from their general budgets as they do now.

This is cutting-edge technology, and the Programme has always been clear that it will not take any risks with public safety. The emergency services will transition when they consider the network ready. Greater clarity on the date ESN will be available is likely to be understood by the end of the year.

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Grouped Questions: 107019 | 107020 | 106980 | 106849 | 106850
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the cost of the upgrade to the Emergency Services Network; and how much of that cost will be incurred by police forces.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. There will be no risks with public safety and there will be no gap in the emergency services’ communications provision. It will ultimately be for the emergency services themselves to confirm they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

The Airwave network will remain operational until the emergency services have transitioned to using the new Emergency Services Network.

The current agreement with Motorola can be extended equally for a fixed price per region per month. The regional extension price enables the Government to only buy additional Airwave service for those regions requiring the service for longer. In terms of funding of future ASL contract extensions falling to the police service in England and Wales, these decisions will be subject to ministerial consideration at that time as part of the annual police finance settlement.

In respect of costs to police forces I can confirm that the Home Office contributes 75% of the costs of setting up and operating the core network element of ESN to reflect the policing (England and Wales) share of the joint emergency service programme. This share of Core costs is met through a reallocation within the police funding settlement. Police & Crime Commissioners will meet certain local costs, such as new handsets for officers, from their general budgets as they do now.

This is cutting-edge technology, and the Programme has always been clear that it will not take any risks with public safety. The emergency services will transition when they consider the network ready. Greater clarity on the date ESN will be available is likely to be understood by the end of the year.

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Grouped Questions: 107019 | 107020 | 106980 | 106960 | 106850
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 October 2017
Home Office
Emergency Services Network
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she expects the Emergency Services Network to come into force.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The new Emergency Services Network (ESN) will provide the dedicated teams who work so hard protecting the public and saving lives with the most advanced communications system of its kind anywhere in the world. There will be no risks with public safety and there will be no gap in the emergency services’ communications provision. It will ultimately be for the emergency services themselves to confirm they are content with the new ESN service, as the existing Airwave system will continue until transition on to the ESN is completed.

The Airwave network will remain operational until the emergency services have transitioned to using the new Emergency Services Network.

The current agreement with Motorola can be extended equally for a fixed price per region per month. The regional extension price enables the Government to only buy additional Airwave service for those regions requiring the service for longer. In terms of funding of future ASL contract extensions falling to the police service in England and Wales, these decisions will be subject to ministerial consideration at that time as part of the annual police finance settlement.

In respect of costs to police forces I can confirm that the Home Office contributes 75% of the costs of setting up and operating the core network element of ESN to reflect the policing (England and Wales) share of the joint emergency service programme. This share of Core costs is met through a reallocation within the police funding settlement. Police & Crime Commissioners will meet certain local costs, such as new handsets for officers, from their general budgets as they do now.

This is cutting-edge technology, and the Programme has always been clear that it will not take any risks with public safety. The emergency services will transition when they consider the network ready. Greater clarity on the date ESN will be available is likely to be understood by the end of the year.

The costs of upgrading to the Emergency Services Network and the costs to extend Airwave contracts for the emergency services are available in the public domain at:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Upgrading-emergency-service-communications-the-Emergency-services-Network.pdf

and

https://www.london.gov.uk/moderngov/documents/b15926/Minutes%20-%20Appendix%201%20-%20Transcript%20of%20Item%205%20Tuesday%2018-Jul-2017%2010.00%20GLA%20Oversight%20Committee.pdf?T=9

Grouped Questions: 107019 | 107020 | 106980 | 106960 | 106849
Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 10 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade: USA
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the cost to his Department was of producing the July 2017 report entitled UK trade and investment highlights in the 435 US Congressional districts.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The “UK Trade and Investment Highlights in the 435 US Congressional districts” report was developed as a tool to build support for further strengthening the UK-US trading relationship.

There was no direct cost to the Department for International Trade for producing the report.

The report is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/631648/congressional_report_print.pdf

Q
(Birmingham, Hall Green)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Autism: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress the Government has made on implementation of the recommendations of the working group on autism on the time taken to diagnose autism.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 October 2017

There is no formal working group currently looking specifically at the time taken for an autism diagnosis to be made. Information on current waiting times for an autism assessment is drawn from the Public Health England report of the 2016 Self-Assessment Framework exercise.

The Department continues to work with its partners to address long waiting times for an autism diagnosis. This includes work to ensure the inclusion of autism diagnosis and outcomes indicators in the Mental Health Services Dataset, with new robust data collected from 1 April 2018. This will bring more transparency and help to drive up performance on waiting times.

Q
(Birmingham, Hall Green)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Visas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to resolve the delays in processing settlement visa applications; and whether those delays are caused by staff shortages.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Settlement applications may be made overseas and in the UK. The percentage of straightforward out of country settlement visa applications which were completed within Service Standard was 96.5% in the first quarter of 2017 (against a target of 98.5%).

Whilst some cases have fallen outside the standard processing timescales, there are currently plans and resourcing in place to resolve outstanding cases and we expect that there will be a sustained improvement from this point onwards.

The Home Office endeavours to resolve all applications as promptly as possible, however it is also vital that the correct decisions are made, particularly with complex cases that require detailed consideration and verification of evidence. If an application is not straightforward and expected to take longer than the standard processing time, UKVI will write to the customer within the standard processing time and explain what will happen next.

The published information on processing times for visa applications is published as part of the Migration Transparency data, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-operations-transparency-data-august-2017

Q
Asked by Andrew Gwynne
(Denton and Reddish)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Justice
Counter-terrorism: USA
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has received information obtained by the US Administration by means of provisions within the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 20 October 2017

It is the longstanding policy of successive British Governments not to comment on intelligence matters.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
HM Treasury
Customs Officers
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of new customs officials that will be required as a result of leaving the Customs Union; and what the estimated additional annual cost to the public purse will be of employing those officials.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HMRC are considering the capacity of staff working in customs across government as part of their EU exit planning. The staffing levels and resources required by HMRC after the UK leaves the European Union will be dependent on the outcome of negotiations.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
HM Treasury
Customs Declaration Services Programme
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what contingency plans are in place in the event that the Customs Declaration Service is not fully operational before the UK is due to leave the EU in March 2019.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The delivery of the new Customs Declaration Service (CDS) is on target, and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) expects to meet its planned delivery date in January 2019. The progress of the programme is subject to rigorous and ongoing internal scrutiny.

Nevertheless, HMRC has robust contingency arrangements in place, including:

- A transition process between August 2018 and January 2019 where traders will start moving to CDS.

- Dual-running of the existing Customs Handling of Import and Export Freight (CHIEF) service with CDS.

- Ensuring CHIEF can handle larger volumes of declarations.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
HM Treasury
Customs Declaration Services Programme
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the new Customs Declaration Service will be fully operational by January 2019; and whether it will have been fully tested to ensure that it is able to manage any increase in the volume of declarations associated with leaving the Customs Union.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The delivery of the new Customs Declaration Service (CDS) is on target, and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) expects to meet its planned delivery date in January 2019. CDS is undergoing comprehensive testing to ensure that it can manage an increase in the volume of declarations. HMRC is following industry best practice in carrying out that work, by performance testing the individual software components first and gradually building up to test across the whole of the CDS system.

Q
Asked by Andrew Gwynne
(Denton and Reddish)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Fire Regulations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 20 September 2017 to Question 7325, if his Department will issue additional fire safety advice in the period before the reviews and inquiry are complete.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Government will continue to work with the Expert Panel to publish advice for building owners, as needed, in order to help them to protect their residents from fire. All advice is published on the Building Safety Programme webpage: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/building-safety-programme

Q
Asked by Oliver Dowden
(Hertsmere)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Shops: Wheelchairs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment his Department has made of the relative accessibility to wheelchair users of shops in England.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Government has commissioned research to evaluate the effectiveness of regulatory guidance about accessibility and we will publish the results in due course. We have not undertaken a separate assessment of the relative accessibility of shops for wheelchair users.

Q
Asked by Oliver Dowden
(Hertsmere)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Shops: Wheelchairs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that high street shops are wheelchair accessible.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Part M (Access to and use of buildings) of the Building Regulations requires that where building work takes place, including the erection or extension (and in some case material alteration) of a building, reasonable provision is made for access to and use of the building and its facilities. Approved Document M (Access to and use of Buildings) provides guidance on common ways of demonstrating compliance with this requirement. The Equality Act 2010 also places duties on building owners and service providers to make anticipatory reasonable adjustments to the physical features of buildings where a disabled person may be placed at a substantial disadvantage compared to a non-disabled person.

Grouped Questions: 107182
Q
Asked by Oliver Dowden
(Hertsmere)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Travellers: Caravan Sites
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local authorities have appropriate powers to re-coup the cost of repairing damage caused by unauthorised Traveller encampments.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Local authorities have extensive powers to deal with unauthorised encampments, and Travellers can be ordered by a court to pay the court costs of the claim. We signalled our intention to issue a consultation on what more can be done to improve the effectiveness of enforcement powers, and will consider all suggestions carefully.

Q
Asked by Oliver Dowden
(Hertsmere)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Travellers: Caravan Sites
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to enable local authorities to expedite the removal of unauthorised Traveller encampments.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

We intend to consult on the effectiveness of enforcement against unauthorised developments and encampments. We will seek views on whether there is anything that would ensure existing powers can be used more effectively. We will set out further details in due course.

Q
Asked by Oliver Dowden
(Hertsmere)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Shops: Wheelchairs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what his policy is on statutory provisions to ensure that all shops in England have facilities to enable wheelchair access; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Part M (Access to and use of buildings) of the Building Regulations requires that where building work takes place, including the erection or extension (and in some case material alteration) of a building, reasonable provision is made for access to and use of the building and its facilities. Approved Document M (Access to and use of Buildings) provides guidance on common ways of demonstrating compliance with this requirement. The Equality Act 2010 also places duties on building owners and service providers to make anticipatory reasonable adjustments to the physical features of buildings where a disabled person may be placed at a substantial disadvantage compared to a non-disabled person.

Grouped Questions: 107183
Q
Asked by Jo Stevens
(Cardiff Central)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Sports: Discrimination
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information her Department holds on cases of discrimination on the basis of (a) race, (b) gender and (c) sexual orientation in elite sport.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport does not hold any information on cases of discrimination in elite sport. Although UK Sport does not hold disaggregated data on discrimination, since 2013, UK Sport has received two complaints on the basis of race discrimination (one of which was related to grassroots sport), one gymnastics-related complaint on the basis of gender, and multiple cycling-related complaints on the basis of gender against a cycling coach's alleged comments to a female rider. UK Sport has received no complaints regarding sexual orientation.

There is no place for racism, sexism, homophobia or any other kind of discrimination in sport. Tackling discrimination lies at the heart of the cross-government sport strategy "Sporting Future" and we want sport to be at the forefront of equality. Government continues to work with National Governing Bodies and organisations such as Kick It Out, Stonewall and Women in Football to tackle discrimination in local, national and international sport. Our aim is to increase diversity among sporting organisations and to help the sport sector be more inclusive and welcoming to its spectators, participants and people in its workforce. Our Code for Sport Governance stipulates that funded sporting organisations should publish information about their work to foster all aspects of diversity within their leadership and decision-making.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Gaming Machines: Ellesmere Port and Neston
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will estimate the amount spent each year on fixed-odds betting terminals in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Neither the Department nor the Gambling Commission hold information concerning the number of Fixed-Odds Betting Terminals and, therefore spend, on Fixed-Odds Betting Terminals in individual constituencies.

Grouped Questions: 107237
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Gaming Machines: Ellesmere Port and Neston
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many fixed-odds betting terminals are licensed in Ellesmere Port and Neston constituency.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Neither the Department nor the Gambling Commission hold information concerning the number of Fixed-Odds Betting Terminals and, therefore spend, on Fixed-Odds Betting Terminals in individual constituencies.

Grouped Questions: 107236
Q
Asked by Jon Trickett
(Hemsworth)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 10 October 2017 to Question 10447, on Ministry of Defence: procurement, to which firms those 20 civil servants within the Government Commercial Function were seconded.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The 20 civil servants within the Government Commercial Function were seconded to NATO Eurofighter and Tornado Management Agency and the Organisation for Joint Armament Cooperation.

Q
Asked by Luke Pollard
(Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Defence
HMS Prince of Wales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether HMS Prince of Wales has been designed to operate in littoral waters.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers have been designed to operate as part of a Maritime Task Group in both the Carrier Strike and Littoral Manoeuvre roles, offering a significant basing option for the projection of air and amphibious power.

For operational security reasons, we do not comment on specific capabilities, as this would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

Q
(Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Shropshire
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if the additional £3.7 million allocated to Shropshire schools was previously allocated to another area of her Department's spending.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

We have an announced an additional £1.3bn investment in core schools funding across 2018-19 and 2019-20, including an additional £3.7m for schools in Shropshire.

This additional £1.3bn investment will be funded in full from efficiencies and savings from within the Department's budget. We believe it is right to prioritise core schools funding, even as we continue the vital task of repairing the public finances. Making savings and efficiencies allows us to maximise the funding which is allocated directly to schools, which can ensure that it is spent where it will have the greatest impact. It will not be possible to attribute funding increases in specific areas to particular savings and efficiencies.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
NHS: Managers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish the list of (a) invitees and (b) attendees for the meeting of NHS leaders on 18 September 2017; and what criteria was used to select those invitees.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The system leaders from the most challenged systems on Accident and Emergency were invited to attend the meeting on 18 September 2017. The Chairs and Chief Executives of the relevant trusts and the Chairs and Accounting Officers of the relevant clinical commissioning groups were invited.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Health Services: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many agreements have been signed by clinical commissioning groups which are not subject to the tariff system.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Information is available on the number of local variation templates received by NHS Improvement and can be found in the table below.

Year

Number of local variation templates

2014/15

186

2015/16

278

2016/17

106

Notes:

Local variations are adjustments to a national price or a currency, agreed by one or more commissioner and one or more provider. Variations can vary in scope from single procedures to groups of services.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
NHS: Managers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish the (a) agenda and (b) minutes of his meeting with NHS leaders on 18 September 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The agenda of the meeting my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health attended on 18 September 2017 is provided below. No minutes were taken of this meeting. National NHS leaders regularly meet regional leaders to discuss operational matters. This is a normal part of business.

10:00

Arrival and registration

Speaker

10:15

Welcome and Purpose

Pauline Philip, National Director For Urgent and Emergency Care

10:25

Keynote Speech

Jeremy Hunt MP, Secretary of State for Health

10:45

National Expectations of Boards and CEOs

Jim Mackey, Chief Executive, NHS Improvement Simon Stevens, Chief Executive, NHS England

11:15

Best Practice Presentations from Trusts

12:10

Accident and emergency and Care Quality Commission

David Behan, Chief Executive, Care Quality Commission

12:20

Outline of winter operations function and expectations of winter planning

National Director For and Urgent Emergency Care

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Regional working sessions

Led by NHS England and NHS Improvement Regional Directors

16:00

Close

Grouped Questions: 107225
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
NHS
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the NHS leaders meeting that he attended on 18 September 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The agenda of the meeting my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health attended on 18 September 2017 is provided below. No minutes were taken of this meeting. National NHS leaders regularly meet regional leaders to discuss operational matters. This is a normal part of business.

10:00

Arrival and registration

Speaker

10:15

Welcome and Purpose

Pauline Philip, National Director For Urgent and Emergency Care

10:25

Keynote Speech

Jeremy Hunt MP, Secretary of State for Health

10:45

National Expectations of Boards and CEOs

Jim Mackey, Chief Executive, NHS Improvement Simon Stevens, Chief Executive, NHS England

11:15

Best Practice Presentations from Trusts

12:10

Accident and emergency and Care Quality Commission

David Behan, Chief Executive, Care Quality Commission

12:20

Outline of winter operations function and expectations of winter planning

National Director For and Urgent Emergency Care

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Regional working sessions

Led by NHS England and NHS Improvement Regional Directors

16:00

Close

Grouped Questions: 107224
Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department of Health
Organs: Donors
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what safeguards will be put in place to ensure that the Government's policy for opt-out for organ donation does not contravene the religious beliefs of those who may not have opted out.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 October 2017

We have announced that we will launch a 12 week consultation, before the end of this year, on increasing rates of organ donation, including a new “opt out” system of consent for England. The consultation will seek views on:

- How to increase rates of organ donation, particularly from Black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities;

- How the issue of consent should be managed within the National Health Service;

- How technology could help people to discuss their preferences with family; and

- How opt out could work in practice, the safeguards needed and how families could be supported.

The major religions in the United Kingdom support the idea of organ donation and transplantation. However, the Government will carefully consult, listen and take account of the views from people from a diverse range of ethnic, religious and cultural communities when considering any changes to the law.

We are still committed to campaigns to raise awareness, and encourage families and friends to discuss their wishes on organ donation.

More information about religious views and principles on organ donation can be found at:

http://www.organdonation.nhs.uk/about-donation/what-does-my-religion-say/

Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of membership of a proscribed organisation under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of possessing an article for terrorist purposes under section 57 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of wearing a uniform under section 13 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of supporting a proscribed organisation under section 12 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of directing a terrorist organisation under section 56 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of finance and money laundering in relation to terrorism acts under sections 15, 16, 17 and 18 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of weapons training under section 54 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of collecting information under section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of providing or receiving instruction or training for terrorism under section 6 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of the encouragement of terrorism under section 1 of the Terrorism Act 2000 in each year since 2000.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107149 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of disseminating terrorist publications under section 2 of the Terrorism Act 2006 in each year since 2006.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107150 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of attendance at a place for terrorist training under section 8 of the Terrorism Act 2006 in each year since 2006.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107151
Q
Asked by Fiona Bruce
(Congleton)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Home Office
Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged with, (b) prosecuted for and (c) convicted of preparing acts of terrorism under section 5 of the Terrorism Act 2006 in each year since 2006.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Home Office publishes data on the number of persons charged, prosecuted and convicted, following an arrest for a terrorism-related offence, in the quarterly ‘Operation of police powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and subsequent legislation’ statistical release. Data, broken down by the legislation under which an individual is charged/prosecuted/convicted, are available from 11 September 2001, when the data collection began.

The data can be found alongside the release in the accompanying data tables, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000

Data on charges of those arrested for terrorism-related offences can be found in table A.05a and data on convictions can be found in table A.08a; these data are supplied by the National Counter Terrorism Police Operations Centre.

Data on prosecutions of persons for terrorism-related offences can be found in table C.02, which contains data provided by the Crown Prosecutions Service Counter Terrorism Division (data available since July 2010).

The data are based on the principal offence rule, whereby when an individual is charged/convicted/prosecuted for more than one offence at a time, only the most serious offence is counted in the data.

Grouped Questions: 107139 | 107142 | 107143 | 107144 | 107145 | 107140 | 107141 | 107146 | 107147 | 107148 | 107149 | 107150
Q
Asked by Kate Hoey
(Vauxhall)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Prime Minister
Brexit
Commons
To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to her Oral contribution of 9 October 2017, Official Report, column 55, what sea area she referred to as coastal waters.
A
Answered by: Mrs Theresa May
Answered on: 20 October 2017

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Minister of State for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, my hon. Friend the Member for Camborne and Redruth (Mr Eustice) on 10 July 2017, UIN 2642.

Q
Asked by Tom Brake
(Carshalton and Wallington)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Police: Ethiopia
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much of his Department's financial assistance to Ethiopia is dedicated to be passed on to Ethiopian (a) police or security forces and (b) organisations that have oversight over that country's police or security forces.
A
Answered by: Mark Garnier
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Department for International Trade has not provided any financial assistance to Ethiopia that is dedicated to be passed on to Ethiopian (a) police or security forces and (b) organisations that have oversight over that country's police or security forces.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Trade Agreements
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how the Government plans to negotiate and sign new trade deals while still operating within an interim customs arrangement with the EU and while the UK's future trading relationship with the EU remains undecided.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 20 October 2017

As part of seeking a time-limited interim period with the EU, the UK would intend to pursue new trade negotiations with other countries during this period. It would not bring into effect any new arrangements with third countries which were not consistent with the terms of the interim agreement.

Q
Asked by Leo Docherty
(Aldershot)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Ministry of Defence
European Fighter Aircraft: Saudi Arabia
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to support the sale of a second tranche of Typhoon aircraft to Saudi Arabia.
A
Answered by: Mr Tobias Ellwood
Answered on: 20 October 2017

This Government recognises fully the potential benefits of securing future export orders for Typhoon aircraft. In respect of Saudi Arabia, Ministers and officials are in regular contact with their counterparts to discuss how the UK might help meet that nation's legitimate defence and security requirements. These discussions have included a potential second batch order for Typhoon aircraft.

Q
(Aberavon)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Trade
Antidumping
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans he has to replicate EU Anti-dumping legislation when the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Once the UK has exited the EU, we will be able to operate our own independent trade policy. As part of this, the Government is committed to establishing an effective trade remedies system to provide a safety net for domestic producers if dumping, subsidisation or unexpected surges of imports cause injury.

Our ambition is to not just replace the current EU system, but to put in place a framework that will work for the UK.

Q
Asked by Andrew Gwynne
(Denton and Reddish)
Asked on: 11 October 2017
Department for International Trade
UK-US Trade and Investment Working Group
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 15 September 2017 to Question 9154, if he will publish the agenda of the plenary session of the first meeting of UK-US Trade and Investment Working Group that he chaired in July 2017.
A
Answered by: Greg Hands
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The initial meeting of the UK-US Trade and Investment Working Group, including the plenary session chaired by my Rt. Hon Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade and the US Trade Representative, Ambassador Robert Lighthizer, discussed a range of trade issues This included ensuring commercial continuity for business as the UK leaves the EU, exploring possible ways to strengthen trade and commercial ties consistent with the EU's common commercial policy, and preparing the ground for a potential future trade agreement once the UK leaves the EU.

Q
Asked by Lord Truscott
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Foreign Investment in UK: National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what checks are in place to monitor the safeguarding of UK national security each time a foreign firm invests in the UK.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Under the Enterprise Act 2002, the Government has powers to intervene in mergers on the grounds of national security. The Act sets out the processes which are followed in such cases.

More generally, the Government considers carefully any national security issues raised by foreign investments on a case by case basis.

The Government published a Green Paper, ‘National Security and Infrastructure Investment Review’, on Tuesday 17 October setting out its review of current powers and how these might be amended in the short, and long, term to ensure national security is protected. The Government welcomes respondents’ views on its proposals and options for reform.

The Green Paper is available on Gov.uk and in the Libraries of the House.

Q
Asked by Lord Truscott
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Foreign Investment in UK: National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have any plans to introduce a dedicated body with responsibility for scrutinising those foreign investments which may impact on national security.
A
Answered by: Lord Prior of Brampton
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Government published a Green Paper, ‘National Security and Infrastructure Investment Review’, on Tuesday 17 October setting out its review of current powers and how these might be amended in the short, and long, term to ensure national security is protected. The Government welcomes respondents’ views on its proposals and options for reform.

The Green Paper is available on Gov.uk and in the Libraries of the House.

Q
(Dover)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Border Planning Group
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the terms of reference of the HM Revenue and Customs Border Planning Group.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Border Planning Group is a cross-Whitehall group of senior officials set up by Permanent Secretaries. It does not report to the Chancellor directly. Its work is focussed on planning for border related EU exit issues. Further information about the Border Planning Group’s remit will be published on GOV.UK in due course.

Q
(Aberdeen North)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Treasury: Trade Agreements
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many officials employed in his Department in June 2016 had substantial experience of international trade negotiation.
A
Answered by: Andrew Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HM Treasury has a strong and capable trade policy function which has grown significantly over the past year. In particular we have a dedicated team working on trade policy as well as a team focused on international trade in Financial Services. HM Treasury continues to work closely with other government departments, including the Department for International Trade, to build a world class trade policy that can deliver the best outcomes for the UK.

Q
(North Swindon)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Soft Drinks: Taxation
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate his Department has made of the revenue accrued to the public purse from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy in each year from 2018 to 2022; and what proportion of that revenue will be allocated to (a) England and (b) the devolved administrations.
A
Answered by: Andrew Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

As published in Table 2.2 of the Spring Budget 2017, the levy is expected to raise approximately £385m per year from April 2018. This is less than originally expected at Budget 2016, reflecting the OBRs judgement that producers will reformulate a higher proportion of their products towards lower sugar content.

In total, the Government has provided extra funding across the UK of almost £1.2 billion up to 2020, linked to the levy. This is split with almost £1 billion allocated to the Department for Education in England, and the remainder to the Devolved Administrations. The government is therefore committed to providing more funding to 2020 than the levy is forecast to raise, as the Chancellor guaranteed at Spring Budget 2017.

Every penny of England’s share of the spending funded by the levy will continue to be spent on giving school-aged children a better and healthier future, including through doubling the Primary Sports Premium and providing extra funding for breakfast clubs. Whilst still meeting this commitment, the Secretary of State for Education announced in July that she would reprioritise £315m in healthy pupils capital funding, redirecting it to core schools funding. This is a major boost for our schools. DfE’s overall budget has not been cut and there has been no change to funding for the Devolved Administrations as a result of this reprioritisation.

Grouped Questions: 107380 | 107381
Q
(Dover)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Border Planning Group
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Borders Planning Group has made any recommendations to date.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Border Planning Group made recommendations to ministers but the details will not be disclosed as these relate to the formulation or development of government policy and are ministerial communications.

Q
(Dover)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Border Planning Group
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many full-time equivalent officials report to the Borders Planning Group.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The role of the Border Planning Group is to provide oversight of and assurance of departmental planning for border related issues arising from leaving the EU. The Border Coordination Team within HMRC supports the work of the Border Planning Group and reports into it. This team currently has 18 full time equivalent staff who work with the large number of different teams across Government departments working on border related EU exit matters.

Q
(Dover)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Border Planning Group
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which Departments the Border Planning Group report to in addition to his Department.
A
Answered by: Mel Stride
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Border Planning Group does not report to the Chancellor. The Border Planning Group is a group of senior cross-Whitehall officials, whose members report to their own ministers

Q
(North Swindon)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Soft Drinks: Taxation
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much and what proportion of the Soft Drinks Industry Levy allocated to England is allocated for spending on school sports and healthy living initiatives.
A
Answered by: Andrew Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

As published in Table 2.2 of the Spring Budget 2017, the levy is expected to raise approximately £385m per year from April 2018. This is less than originally expected at Budget 2016, reflecting the OBRs judgement that producers will reformulate a higher proportion of their products towards lower sugar content.

In total, the Government has provided extra funding across the UK of almost £1.2 billion up to 2020, linked to the levy. This is split with almost £1 billion allocated to the Department for Education in England, and the remainder to the Devolved Administrations. The government is therefore committed to providing more funding to 2020 than the levy is forecast to raise, as the Chancellor guaranteed at Spring Budget 2017.

Every penny of England’s share of the spending funded by the levy will continue to be spent on giving school-aged children a better and healthier future, including through doubling the Primary Sports Premium and providing extra funding for breakfast clubs. Whilst still meeting this commitment, the Secretary of State for Education announced in July that she would reprioritise £315m in healthy pupils capital funding, redirecting it to core schools funding. This is a major boost for our schools. DfE’s overall budget has not been cut and there has been no change to funding for the Devolved Administrations as a result of this reprioritisation.

Grouped Questions: 107383 | 107381
Q
(North Swindon)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
HM Treasury
Soft Drinks: Taxation
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to make up in funding for his Department any shortfall from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy in the event that it accrues less revenue for the public purse than it was estimated to do; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Andrew Jones
Answered on: 20 October 2017

As published in Table 2.2 of the Spring Budget 2017, the levy is expected to raise approximately £385m per year from April 2018. This is less than originally expected at Budget 2016, reflecting the OBRs judgement that producers will reformulate a higher proportion of their products towards lower sugar content.

In total, the Government has provided extra funding across the UK of almost £1.2 billion up to 2020, linked to the levy. This is split with almost £1 billion allocated to the Department for Education in England, and the remainder to the Devolved Administrations. The government is therefore committed to providing more funding to 2020 than the levy is forecast to raise, as the Chancellor guaranteed at Spring Budget 2017.

Every penny of England’s share of the spending funded by the levy will continue to be spent on giving school-aged children a better and healthier future, including through doubling the Primary Sports Premium and providing extra funding for breakfast clubs. Whilst still meeting this commitment, the Secretary of State for Education announced in July that she would reprioritise £315m in healthy pupils capital funding, redirecting it to core schools funding. This is a major boost for our schools. DfE’s overall budget has not been cut and there has been no change to funding for the Devolved Administrations as a result of this reprioritisation.

Grouped Questions: 107383 | 107380
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Social Rented Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many (a) bungalows and (b) four bedroom homes were available for social rent in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Department’s English Housing Survey collects information about the type of housing stock in the social rented sector, irrespective of whether it is available to rent.

The English Housing Survey can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/english-housing-survey-2015-to-2016-headline-report.

In 2015 (the latest date for which data are available), there were an estimated 421,000 bungalows in the social rented sector. There were an estimated 138,000 four bedroom homes in the sector.

Q
Asked by Vernon Coaker
(Gedling)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Battle of Cambrai: Anniversaries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to mark the centenary of the Battle of Cambrai; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Whilst the Government has no plans to deliver a specific event to commemorate the Battle of Cambrai, the Royal Tank Regiment (RTR) will be commemorating the centenary of the battle over the weekend of 24 to 26 November, with a series of events for both serving and former members of the Regiment. They will include a Drumhead service at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's Louverval Military Cemetery and a parade through Cambrai to mark the Regiment’s Freedom of the Town.

Q
Asked by Lucy Frazer
(South East Cambridgeshire)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Teachers: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the prevalence of recruitment agencies cold-calling teachers on school telephone lines during school hours and contacting teachers on their professional email addresses.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Department is undertaking user research to strengthen its understanding of the issues schools face when advertising teacher vacancies and the challenges teachers have finding and applying for jobs. The research will also be used to inform the development and design of a new national teacher vacancy service. This service will aim to reduce the time schools spend on publishing vacancies and the cost of recruiting new teachers; make it easier for teachers to find jobs quickly and easily; and increase the availability and quality of data on teacher recruitment.

This research is highlighting concerns in schools about the cost and practices of recruitment agencies, which we will explore further.

The Department is in the planning phase of a new commercial framework for the use of schools engaging with supply agencies. As part of this we are proposing to include measures designed to improve the conduct of some agencies.

Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Music: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have been taught music in schools in each constituency in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Department does not record the number of pupils being taught particular subjects. The Department records the number of pupils entering into GCSE and A level examinations for each subject. This provides the best proxy for the figure requested; this figure is for local authorities and not constituencies.

The figures for the past three years (2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16) are published online[1].

The figures for 2016/17 entries are not available yet and will be published in January 2018[2].

The Department’s national network of 120 music education hubs ensures that all pupils aged 5 to 18 have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument; to make music with others and learn to sing.

[1]https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/download-data - Select the year, then ‘all of England’, ‘key stage 4 qualification and subject data’ and then download the Excel file. You can then sum the entries in music, for each school, within each local authority

[2]The data will be available here: https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/download-data

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Home Education: GCSE
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the median cost was for a home-schooled student to sit five GCSEs, including mathematics and English in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

There is provision in the Education Act 1996 to support parents who decide to have their children home-schooled. In doing so, parents are also accepting full responsibility for the consequences, including any costs incurred.

The Department does not collect data on the charges made by schools to private GCSE candidates. These costs are decided by the individual exam centre at which the pupil sits their examinations, and will include fees charged by the awarding organisations for their work in developing, processing and awarding qualifications. Exam centres are likely to include an administrative fee to cover costs incurred for providing facilities for a private candidate.

The Department does not collect data on the number of home-schooled children or the quality of their education and so no assessment can be made of the impact of the costs on the educational achievements of home-schooled children.

Grouped Questions: 107437
Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Home Education: Assessments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of exam (a) boards and (b) centres charging home-schooled student to sit exams on the educational achievements of those students.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

There is provision in the Education Act 1996 to support parents who decide to have their children home-schooled. In doing so, parents are also accepting full responsibility for the consequences, including any costs incurred.

The Department does not collect data on the charges made by schools to private GCSE candidates. These costs are decided by the individual exam centre at which the pupil sits their examinations, and will include fees charged by the awarding organisations for their work in developing, processing and awarding qualifications. Exam centres are likely to include an administrative fee to cover costs incurred for providing facilities for a private candidate.

The Department does not collect data on the number of home-schooled children or the quality of their education and so no assessment can be made of the impact of the costs on the educational achievements of home-schooled children.

Grouped Questions: 107436
Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Pupils: Per Capita Costs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons funding that was previously directed to support specific additional needs is now to be directed towards minimum levels of per pupil funding.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The national funding formula protects the £5.9 billion total for funding directed towards additional needs, as proposed in our consultation. It distributes that funding in line with the best available evidence: using a broad measure of deprivation to include all those who are likely to need extra help; and increasing the proportion of additional needs spending allocated on the basis of low prior attainment, to give additional support to those who need help to catch up.

We heard throughout the consultation that we could do more through our formula to support those schools that attract the lowest levels of per pupil funding. We have listened carefully, and with the additional investment of £1.3 billion, have decided that it is appropriate both to raise the basic amount that each pupil attracts, and to target additional funding to the lowest funded. We believe that this will help ensure that every school has the resources it needs to provide appropriate support to all of its pupils. None of this additional funding has been found by reducing funding directed towards additional needs.

Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the level of funding in the new funding formula for schools that have a large number of pupils with additional needs and those that do not.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The national funding formula allocates the majority of funding, 72.9%, through the basic per-pupil allowance, while protecting the funding directed towards children with additional needs, with a total spend of £5.9 billion and overall weighting of 17.8%.

Funding will be distributed according to the individual needs and characteristics of every school in the country. This will direct resources where they are needed most, and provide transparency and predictability for schools.

The attached table shows the unit values, total funding and proportion of funding for each factor in the formula.

unit values, total funding and proportion (PDF Document, 110.55 KB)
Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Education
Secondary Education: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the Government's policy is on secondary school inclusion; and how that policy has been taken account of in the new funding formula.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 20 October 2017

We are committed to an inclusive education for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), and progressively removing the barriers to education and participation in mainstream education. The Children and Families Act 2014 secures the general presumption in law of mainstream education in relation to decisions about where children and young people with special educational needs should be educated; and the Equality Act 2010 provides protection from discrimination for disabled people. The 2014 Act also requires local authorities to ensure the views, wishes and feelings of children, young people and parents are taken into account when deciding what support children and young people with SEND need.

The introduction of national funding formulae for schools and high needs is supported by significant extra investment of £1.3 billion across 2018-19 and 2019-20, over and above the budget announcement at the 2015 spending review. We are therefore able to provide additional funding for every school and allocate extra high needs funding to every local authority, both of which will support schools in providing for their pupils, including those with SEND. Both schools and high needs national funding formulae reflect the number of children and young people with SEND who are attending mainstream or specialist provision.

Q
(Gower)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Apples: Exports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) Royal Gala and (b) other types of apples were exported to non-EU countries in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HMRC trade data is unable to identify Royal Gala apples by name. The following table shows the volume of apples exported from the UK to EU member states, at the greatest level of detail available, in the last 5 years for which full data is available:

tonnes

Apple type

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Cider

123

27

1,658

1,328

1,456

Other

20,608

21,113

15,886

19,745

16,277

Total

20,731

21,140

17,544

21,074

17,733

Table Source: HMRC

Grouped Questions: 107447 | 107448 | 107449 | 107450
Q
(Gower)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Apples: Imports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) Royal Gala and (b) other types of apples were imported to the UK from EU member states in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HMRC trade data is unable to identify Royal Gala apples by name. The following table shows the volume of apples exported from the UK to EU member states, at the greatest level of detail available, in the last 5 years for which full data is available:

tonnes

Apple type

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Cider

123

27

1,658

1,328

1,456

Other

20,608

21,113

15,886

19,745

16,277

Total

20,731

21,140

17,544

21,074

17,733

Table Source: HMRC

Grouped Questions: 107446 | 107448 | 107449 | 107450
Q
(Gower)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Apples
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department has taken to encourage farmers to increase the production of apples for (a) home markets, (b) export to the EU and (c) export to non-EU countries.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HMRC trade data is unable to identify Royal Gala apples by name. The following table shows the volume of apples exported from the UK to EU member states, at the greatest level of detail available, in the last 5 years for which full data is available:

tonnes

Apple type

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Cider

123

27

1,658

1,328

1,456

Other

20,608

21,113

15,886

19,745

16,277

Total

20,731

21,140

17,544

21,074

17,733

Table Source: HMRC

Grouped Questions: 107446 | 107447 | 107449 | 107450
Q
(Gower)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Apples: Imports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) Royal Gala and (b) other types of apples that were imported to the UK from non-EU countries in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HMRC trade data is unable to identify Royal Gala apples by name. The following table shows the volume of apples exported from the UK to EU member states, at the greatest level of detail available, in the last 5 years for which full data is available:

tonnes

Apple type

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Cider

123

27

1,658

1,328

1,456

Other

20,608

21,113

15,886

19,745

16,277

Total

20,731

21,140

17,544

21,074

17,733

Table Source: HMRC

Grouped Questions: 107446 | 107447 | 107448 | 107450
Q
(Gower)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Apples: Exports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) Royal Gala and (b) other types of apples were exported to EU member states in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 20 October 2017

HMRC trade data is unable to identify Royal Gala apples by name. The following table shows the volume of apples exported from the UK to EU member states, at the greatest level of detail available, in the last 5 years for which full data is available:

tonnes

Apple type

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Cider

123

27

1,658

1,328

1,456

Other

20,608

21,113

15,886

19,745

16,277

Total

20,731

21,140

17,544

21,074

17,733

Table Source: HMRC

Grouped Questions: 107446 | 107447 | 107448 | 107449
Q
(Aberdeen North)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Trade Agreements
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many officials employed in his Department in June 2016 had substantial experience of international trade negotiation.
A
Answered by: Mark Field
Answered on: 20 October 2017

A significant proportion of FCO officials, both in the UK and overseas, have worked on roles relevant to the prosperity agenda, within which international trade is included. The FCO is also investing further to equip its and other HMG staff with the necessary skills through the Trade Policy and Negotiations Faculty of the Diplomatic Academy​.

Q
Asked by Jared O'Mara
(Sheffield, Hallam)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Israel: Arms Trade
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the humanitarian effect on Palestinians of UK arms sales to Israel.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 20 October 2017

​While we have not made any assessment on this issue, the Government takes its defence export responsibilities extremely seriously and operates some of the most robust export controls in the world. We only approve equipment which is for Israel's legitimate self defence and where we are satisfied it would be consistent with the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria and other relevant commitments. We continue to assess the situation in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories and take into account the latest circumstances when assessing licence applications.

Q
Asked by Jared O'Mara
(Sheffield, Hallam)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Palestinians: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what his policy is on Palestinian refugees' right of return to Israel and the Occupied Palestian Territories.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Government's policy is that the question of the right of return of Palestinian refugees needs to be addressed in a final status agreement, negotiated between the two parties, and including a just, fair and agreed settlement for refugees.

Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Israel: West Bank
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what plans he has to make representations to the Government of Israel on the demolition of the two Palestinian West Bank villages at Khan Al Ahmar and Susiya.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 20 October 2017

​The Government remains gravely concerned about continued demolition of Palestinian property by the Israeli authorities including proposals to demolish the Bedouin villages of Khan al-Ahmar and Susiya.

The UK continues to call on the Israeli authorities to halt proposals to demolish Khan al-Ahmar and Susiya. Prior to the most recently scheduled Israeli High Court hearing about Khan al-Ahmar on 25 September –subsequently postponed - our Embassy in Tel Aviv raised our concerns with the Israeli authorities on 24 September. The Foreign Secretary expressed our concern about the proposals when he met Prime Minister Netanyahu in Israel on 8 March.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Homelessness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the process is for helping people with no fixed abode and no identification documents seeking an ordinary residence determination.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 20 October 2017

Entitlement to free National Health Service care is principally based on being ‘ordinarily resident’ in the United Kingdom. Broadly, this means living here on a lawful and properly settled basis for the time being, with non-European Economic Area nationals subject to immigration control also being required to have an immigration status of ‘indefinite leave to remain’. Overseas visitors, who are not ordinarily resident in the UK, are chargeable for NHS care unless an exemption applies.

There is no one single identification document that is required to be presented as evidence of ordinary residence. Guidance to NHS decision makers includes a tool with which to assess whether a person is likely to be ordinarily resident in the UK. This makes clear that a person of no fixed abode may still be considered ordinarily resident here, and the NHS should work collaboratively with the patient and consider all the facts of their circumstances in making an ordinarily resident determination. As regards whether or not a person has indefinite leave to remain in the UK, NHS staff may request this information from the Home Office, solely to assist them in making the ordinarily resident determination.

Q
(Jarrow)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
NHS: Tyne and Wear
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment he has made of the financial sustainability of NHS services in (a) Tyne and Wear and (b) South Tyneside.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The National Health Service leadership bodies have developed their own plan for delivering financial balance and sustainability for the NHS. We support that plan and have invested in the NHS to do so, with funding set to increase by £8 billion per year by 2020-21 compared to 2015-16. But it is for local leaders in Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP) areas, working together with NHS England and NHS Improvement, to deliver against their own plans to achieve financial sustainability.

We are keenly aware that local issues exist within the national plan, but as with all public services, local NHS areas need to live within their means. NHS England and NHS Improvement will continue to work with areas to balance their financial plans.

Progress is being made. The NHS has worked hard to manage its finances in a challenging period, reporting significant improvements compared to previous years. Nationally, the overall deficit, the size of individual deficits and the number of trusts reporting a deficit, are all significantly down.

We are advised that the financial position of the Northumberland, Tyne and Wear and North Durham STP footprint (which includes both South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust and the broader Tyne and Wear region) is deteriorating versus 2016-17, although Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust and Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust are predicted to maintain a substantial, if reduced, surplus.

Q
(Bridgend)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department of Health
Medical Treatments: Innovation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to promote opportunities for patients to participate in clinical research; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The development of new and better treatments would not be possible without patients and the public taking part in research, and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is committed to their active involvement in National Health Service, public health and social care research. In 2015/16, more than 605,000 people participated in clinical research studies through the NIHR Clinical Research Network. INVOLVE, the NIHR’s national advisory group on patient and public involvement in research, help members of the public to advise on NIHR research, helps to identify and prioritise research topics, assess funding proposals, and carry out and disseminate findings. INVOLVE is also at the forefront of a growing international public involvement movement seeking to collectively promote and advance public involvement in health and social care research around the world.

The Government also supports the work of the James Lind Alliance, which brings patients, carers, clinicians and medical research charities together to identify and prioritise research topics. In addition, we fund the UK Clinical Trials Gateway and Join Dementia Research to enable patients and clinicians to find out about clinical trials that may be of interest to them.

Q
(Jarrow)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Transport
Transport: Infrastructure
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to tackle funding disparities in transport infrastructure between North and South England.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Government is carrying out the biggest investment in transport in the North for a generation, and remains committed to ensuring that the whole country gets the transport infrastructure that it needs. Most recently, on 2 October, the Government announced an additional £100m for local road schemes in the North to tackle congestion pinch-points and speed up journeys, while an extra £300m will help push forward plans for Northern Powerhouse Rail to bolster links between Northern towns and cities with more frequent and faster services.

The Government is already providing better rail journeys through the Great North Rail Project, new Northern and TransPennine franchises, and High Speed 2, the first new North-South railway in this country for over a century. This will greatly increase capacity and connections for millions of people, with high speed stations in Manchester, Leeds, Crewe and Sheffield.

Q
(Jarrow)
Asked on: 12 October 2017
Department for Transport
Transport: Public Expenditure
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding from the public purse his Department has allocated to transport per head of population in (a) the North East, (b) Greater London and (c) the South East.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 20 October 2017

The Department for Transport does not allocate funding to transport on a per head of population basis.

Investment decisions are made based on a rigorous and fair appraisal process that ensures spending goes to the projects and programmes where it is most needed. As the Department emphasised in the Transport Investment Strategy, investment decisions should reflect a clear understanding of the particular needs of the country. The Department would value more involvement from regional transport bodies, such as Transport for the North, in deciding how best to invest in transport in their region.

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