Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Pollinators: Monitoring
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Government's National Pollinator Strategy, published in November 2014, what progress has been made on developing a pollinator indicator under the planned Biodiversity 2020 monitoring strategy.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 20 September 2017

The National Pollinator Strategy was launched in November 2014 and included commitments on measuring progress by developing an indicator on the status of pollinators and by evaluating Nature Improvement Areas (NIAs) and agri-environment schemes.

Defra has developed an indicator of the status of pollinating insects in partnership with the research community and the voluntary sector. The indicator was first published in 2014 and integrated into the suite of 24 indicators used to track progress with Biodiversity 2020: our Strategy for England’s Wildlife and Ecosystem Services. The indicator summarises trends for almost 400 pollinating insect species and was last published on3 August (www.gov.uk/government/statistics/england-biodiversity-indicators). It shows that the overall status of pollinating insects has declined since 1980. There are, however, early indications that this trend may have stabilised in recent years. We will continue to take action for pollinators as set out in our Pollinator Strategy and encourage others to do the same through our Bees’ Needs campaign.

The monitoring and evaluation framework for NIAs was updated in 2014 and included two voluntary indicators on population of threatened or widespread species, including a number of pollinating insects.

A report on monitoring and evaluation of NIAs was published in 2015 (www.gov.uk/government/publications/nature-improvement-areas-improved-ecological-networks/nature-improvement-areas-about-the-programme). This found no significant change in any of the species indicators in the NIAs over the short period involved. Collectively, however, the 12 NIAs secured beneficial management on over 13,500 ha of important wildlife habitats and put in place action to create 4,500 ha of new habitats, primarily species rich grasslands and heathland which will provide important sources of pollen and nectar for pollinating insects.

For agri-environment schemes, Natural England has a contract in place with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and the British Trust for Ornithology to provide a landscape-scale evaluation of the impact of Countryside Stewardship in England on mobile species, including pollinators. Initial findings are expected in 2018.

Since 2015, we have initiated a pollinator monitoring and research partnership with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, to strengthen pollinator monitoring across Great Britain and improve our capacity to understand trends in pollination services. Details of the partnership are available on the external Centre for Ecology and Hydrology website.

Grouped Questions: 10162
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 12 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Pollinators: Monitoring
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 32 of the National Pollinator Strategy, published by his Department in November 2014, what progress has been made on extending the monitoring and evaluation framework for nature improvement areas to include pollinators.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 20 September 2017

The National Pollinator Strategy was launched in November 2014 and included commitments on measuring progress by developing an indicator on the status of pollinators and by evaluating Nature Improvement Areas (NIAs) and agri-environment schemes.

Defra has developed an indicator of the status of pollinating insects in partnership with the research community and the voluntary sector. The indicator was first published in 2014 and integrated into the suite of 24 indicators used to track progress with Biodiversity 2020: our Strategy for England’s Wildlife and Ecosystem Services. The indicator summarises trends for almost 400 pollinating insect species and was last published on3 August (www.gov.uk/government/statistics/england-biodiversity-indicators). It shows that the overall status of pollinating insects has declined since 1980. There are, however, early indications that this trend may have stabilised in recent years. We will continue to take action for pollinators as set out in our Pollinator Strategy and encourage others to do the same through our Bees’ Needs campaign.

The monitoring and evaluation framework for NIAs was updated in 2014 and included two voluntary indicators on population of threatened or widespread species, including a number of pollinating insects.

A report on monitoring and evaluation of NIAs was published in 2015 (www.gov.uk/government/publications/nature-improvement-areas-improved-ecological-networks/nature-improvement-areas-about-the-programme). This found no significant change in any of the species indicators in the NIAs over the short period involved. Collectively, however, the 12 NIAs secured beneficial management on over 13,500 ha of important wildlife habitats and put in place action to create 4,500 ha of new habitats, primarily species rich grasslands and heathland which will provide important sources of pollen and nectar for pollinating insects.

For agri-environment schemes, Natural England has a contract in place with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and the British Trust for Ornithology to provide a landscape-scale evaluation of the impact of Countryside Stewardship in England on mobile species, including pollinators. Initial findings are expected in 2018.

Since 2015, we have initiated a pollinator monitoring and research partnership with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, to strengthen pollinator monitoring across Great Britain and improve our capacity to understand trends in pollination services. Details of the partnership are available on the external Centre for Ecology and Hydrology website.

Grouped Questions: 10029
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 14 September 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what terms of reference she has set for the study of the economic and social contributions and costs of EU citizens in the UK that she has commissioned from the independent Migration Advisory Committee; and whether other studies covering social and cultural contributions will be commissioned.
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department uses for assessments of humanitarian protection after refugees have been in the UK for five years; and what that guidance advises on the (a) retention of documents, (b) time to be taken for the process and (c) criteria by which decisions should be made; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 12 September 2017

Guidance is based on asylum policy “Settlement Protection”. This guidance explains the circumstances in which the Home Office will consider an application for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) following a grant of refugee status and leave or humanitarian protection (HP). The Settlement Protection Asylum Instruction is published policy, and therefore publically available on GOV.UK:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/settlement-protection-asylum-policy-instruction

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Department for Transport
Taxis: Registration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department plans to establish a national database of registered taxi and private hire vehicles in conjunction with the DVLA and police.
A
Answered by: Mr John Hayes
Answered on: 12 September 2017

The Government currently has no plans to establish a national database of registered taxi and private hire vehicles. However, at the recent Westminster Hall Debate on the ‘Regulation of working conditions in the private hire industry’ I announced my intention to set up a working group to consider the regulation of the sector. The group’s terms of reference and membership will be confirmed shortly.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Drinks: Plastics
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to promote the use of drinking straws made from non-polluting materials.
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Drinks: Plastics
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to encourage retailers and food outlets to eliminate the use of plastic straws.
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 September 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Pollinators
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 32 of the National Pollinator Strategy, published by his Department in November 2014, what interim measurements of progress against the aims of that strategy have so far been made.
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 September 2017
Department of Health
Benzodiazepines
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what data his Department collected on benzodiazepine dependence relating to 2016.
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
Visas: Married People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department provides for its caseworkers on (a) the timescale for, (b) the use of discretion in assessing and (c) assessment of the minimum income in applications for spouses to join someone with a legal right to live in the UK, including the timescale, the assessment of minimum income and the application of discretion.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 11 September 2017

The guidance for caseworkers on the minimum income requirement for spouse visas is published on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/chapter-8-appendix-fm-family-members

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
Immigration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her Department's definition of a complex case is with regard to immigration cases; and how the decision is taken for a case not to be subject to the timescale of six months for an immigration decision.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 11 September 2017

The Home Office has clear internal guidance on the management of asylum claims and the factors that can lead to a case being designated as ‘non straight forward’. These cases are proactively managed to ensure barriers are cleared and decisions are made as soon as possible. There are many factors that could lead to a case being designated as ‘non straight forward’ including medical issues with the claimant, non compliance from the claimant that delays case progression and referrals to specialist casework units.

The decision to designate a case as ‘non straight forward’ must be discussed and agreed by an officer at least the grade of a Senior Executive Officer and a case cannot be designated simply because the 6 month target cannot be met. Where a case is designated as ‘non straight forward the claimant will be informed of the delay to the decision.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
British Nationality: Assessments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that the Knowledge of Language and Life in the UK test is being correctly used in (a) Bristol and (b) elsewhere.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 11 September 2017

The Home Office has a number of measures in place to ensure testing around both English language and knowledge of life is correctly followed in all parts of the country. To maintain the integrity of the process we do not publicise the specific measures in place.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Department for Transport
Taxis: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to establish minimum requirements which all local authorities must abide by when granting licenses to taxi or private hire vehicle drivers.
A
Answered by: Mr John Hayes
Answered on: 11 September 2017

The Department has established a working group to consider current issues concerns relating to taxi and private hire vehicle licensing, and produce focussed recommendations for action. National standards were proposed by the Law Commission in its 2014 report on taxi and private hire licensing, and I have asked the working group to consider relevant Law Commission recommendations in its deliberations.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to commence the appointment process for the second Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner; and what criteria will be used to assess applicants.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 07 September 2017

The first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner was appointed by Government on a three-year fixed term contract which ends later this year. Decisions in relation to this appointment will be taken in accordance with the New Public Appointments Governance Code published on 16 December 2016.

Grouped Questions: 8408
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2017
Home Office
Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the process is for the appointment of the independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 07 September 2017

The first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner was appointed by Government on a three-year fixed term contract which ends later this year. Decisions in relation to this appointment will be taken in accordance with the New Public Appointments Governance Code published on 16 December 2016.

Grouped Questions: 6955
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Work Capability Assessment: Chronic Illnesses
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what guidance is given to work capability assessors who deal with claimants who suffer from chronic fluctuating conditions.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 07 September 2017

It is recognised that over time most conditions fluctuate to some degree and that it is therefore essential that the assessment works for people with fluctuating conditions. The Health Professional carrying out the assessment is directed not to focus on an individual’s ‘best day’ or take a ‘snapshot’ of their condition on the day of their face-to-face consultation but to take a view of the claimant’s ability over a longer period of time. This presents a more coherent picture of the disabling effects of the claimant’s health condition.

The Centre for Health and Disability Assessments (CHDA) engages with relevant stakeholders in developing their training for Health Professionals, who receive comprehensive training in disability analysis. This includes a functional evaluation as to how medical conditions and the long-term medical treatment of those conditions affect an individual over time.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 August 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, What assessment his Department has made of the appropriate ratio of staff to prisoners in each prison for operating a safe and rehabilitative prison regime.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 07 September 2017

There are arrangements in place in every prison, taking into account population and accommodation, to set staffing levels which are sufficient to maintain safe and decent conditions.

We are significantly increasing staff numbers by recruiting a net 2,500 extra prison officers by December 2018.

This will allow us to introduce a new key worker role, in which all prison officers on wings will support a small caseload of prisoners, improving the quality of staff-prisoner relationships and tackling the drivers of each prisoner’s offending.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department of Health
Weston Hospital: Accident and Emergency Departments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment has been made of the potential effect of the decision to close Weston General Hospital's accident and emergency department at night on the long-term staffing of that department.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 21 July 2017

Since the Trust Board’s decision temporarily to close Weston General Hospital’s accident and emergency department at night, North Bristol NHS Trust and University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UHB) have invested in additional staff shifts in their emergency departments and medical assessment units, and UHB has increased bed numbers. Additional community resources have also been made available in north Somerset to support people in their own homes.

Before the temporary closure, the Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Sustainability and Transformation Plan put in place a comprehensive set of actions to mitigate the impact. These included agreeing a bespoke policy whereby patients who are expected to stay in hospital for more than 48 hours are transported back to Weston General Hospital as soon as they are deemed clinically fit enough to travel, in order to reduce the burden on neighbouring hospitals.

Weston General Hospital is working with local general practitioners, community services, social care colleagues and neighbouring hospitals to strengthen, redesign and rebuild urgent and emergency care services in north Somerset. This includes exploring alternative staffing models for its emergency department.

By consolidating the small number of senior medical staff into daytime hours, the Trust is now able to deliver improved staff training and team building. The aim is that leadership will improve, making its emergency department a more attractive place to work. The Trust has already recruited two new consultants to work in its emergency department since the closure was announced.

Grouped Questions: 4696
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department of Health
Weston Hospital: Accident and Emergency Departments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what additional resources have been allocated to accident and emergency departments in neighbouring hospitals after the decision to close Weston General Hospital's accident and emergency department at night.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 21 July 2017

Since the Trust Board’s decision temporarily to close Weston General Hospital’s accident and emergency department at night, North Bristol NHS Trust and University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UHB) have invested in additional staff shifts in their emergency departments and medical assessment units, and UHB has increased bed numbers. Additional community resources have also been made available in north Somerset to support people in their own homes.

Before the temporary closure, the Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Sustainability and Transformation Plan put in place a comprehensive set of actions to mitigate the impact. These included agreeing a bespoke policy whereby patients who are expected to stay in hospital for more than 48 hours are transported back to Weston General Hospital as soon as they are deemed clinically fit enough to travel, in order to reduce the burden on neighbouring hospitals.

Weston General Hospital is working with local general practitioners, community services, social care colleagues and neighbouring hospitals to strengthen, redesign and rebuild urgent and emergency care services in north Somerset. This includes exploring alternative staffing models for its emergency department.

By consolidating the small number of senior medical staff into daytime hours, the Trust is now able to deliver improved staff training and team building. The aim is that leadership will improve, making its emergency department a more attractive place to work. The Trust has already recruited two new consultants to work in its emergency department since the closure was announced.

Grouped Questions: 4695
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
Avon Fire and Rescue Service: Equipment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of reductions to the numbers of Primary Crewed Aerial Appliances in Avon Fire and Rescue Service on the fire readiness of that service.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 20 July 2017

The Home Office has made no assessment. It is the responsibility of each fire and rescue authority to manage their resources across prevention, protection and operational response to mitigate effectively local risk.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will introduce a transparent system for monitoring her Department's performance on decision-making on applications for asylum support and publish the results, broken down by decision on section 95 (long-term cash or cash and accommodation support) and section 98 (emergency support) applications.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 20 July 2017

Asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute can apply for free accommodation and cash support to cover their essential living needs whilst their cases are considered. If they have an emergency need for accommodation they can ask to be put in initial accommodation whilst their support applications are being processed and the vast majority of such requests are processed on the same day. We aim to resolve Section 95 applications received from people in Initial Accommodation within 3 days and other applications from people staying in private accommodation within 10 days.

All cases are considered on their own merits, in some cases applicants are asked to provide further information before a decision on eligibility can reached. The Home Office monitors closely the performance of asylum support application decision making and we take seriously all complaints about performance failure. The department has robust procedures in place to inspect, investigate and resolve issues when specific information is received, however there are no plans to publish this performance or complaints data.

Grouped Questions: 5533
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish data on the performance of her Department on its decision-making on applications for asylum support broken down by section 95 and section 98 applications; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 20 July 2017

Asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute can apply for free accommodation and cash support to cover their essential living needs whilst their cases are considered. If they have an emergency need for accommodation they can ask to be put in initial accommodation whilst their support applications are being processed and the vast majority of such requests are processed on the same day. We aim to resolve Section 95 applications received from people in Initial Accommodation within 3 days and other applications from people staying in private accommodation within 10 days.

All cases are considered on their own merits, in some cases applicants are asked to provide further information before a decision on eligibility can reached. The Home Office monitors closely the performance of asylum support application decision making and we take seriously all complaints about performance failure. The department has robust procedures in place to inspect, investigate and resolve issues when specific information is received, however there are no plans to publish this performance or complaints data.

Grouped Questions: 5403
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department for Education
Higher Education: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment has been made of the effect of changes in immigration policy on levels of university recruitment.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 18 July 2017

Numbers of international students studying at UK universities are at record highs - over 170,000 entrants to UK higher education institutions for the sixth year running. The latest Home Office visa data also shows that, since 2011, university-sponsored visa applications have risen by around 11 per cent.

The Government fully recognises the important contribution that international students make to the UK’s higher education sector, both economically and culturally. There remains no limit to the number of international students who can come to the UK to study.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 06 July 2017
Department for Education
Special Educational Needs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure all maintained schools receive adequate funding for catering for children with special needs.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 17 July 2017

Mainstream schools are funded through the formula set by their local authority. The funding formula is decided by each local authority and often uses factors such as the prior level of attainment of the pupils in the school to give an estimate of the additional support for those with special educational needs (SEN) that the school will need to make available.

Local authorities are required to delegate funds to a level that enables schools to meet the additional cost of pupils with SEN up to £6,000 per annum, and when a school can demonstrate that the costs exceed this, the local authority should allocate top-up funding from its high needs budget.

The local authority can also use its high needs budget to give extra funding to schools with a disproportionate number of pupils with SEN.

We have provided local authorities with £130 million of additional funding for high needs this year.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department of Health
Breast Cancer: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of drugs for the treatment and post-treatment needs of breast cancer patients contain lactose; and what provision is made for breast cancer patients who are intolerant or allergic to lactose.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 17 July 2017

Lactose (milk sugar) is commonly used as a diluent in solid oral dosage forms such as tablets and capsules; however is rarely present in oral liquid presentations or parenteral dosage forms, such as injections. While no list of “lactose-free” medicines is maintained, the presence or absence of lactose in any licensed medicine, including those for breast cancer, can be readily identified.

Where a medicine contains lactose, this is highlighted, together with the quantity of lactose, within the Summary of Product Characteristics. The package leaflet for that medicine will also highlight in qualitative terms whether the medicine contains lactose. The package leaflet is provided with each pack of medicine sold or dispensed in the United Kingdom.

The British National Formulary, a standard medical text in the UK, advises that the lactose content in most medicines is too small to cause problems in most lactose-intolerant patients. However, in patients with severe lactose intolerance, lactose content should be determined before prescribing especially if they are taking several products containing lactose.

Clinicians prescribe the medicines and drugs that are most appropriate for their patient, taking into account all relevant factors and guidance. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, which is responsible for the regulation of medicines in the UK, will help prescribers to establish the availability of a lactose free version of any particular medicine.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
HM Treasury
Economic Situation
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the economic effect of the enforcement of immigration policy on businesses in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 17 July 2017

The Treasury has not made any formal assessment of the economic effect of immigration enforcement on business.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department of Health
Weston Hospital: Accident and Emergency Departments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect on Bristol hospitals of the decision to close the accident and emergency department at Weston General Hospital overnight.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 17 July 2017

NHS Improvement and NHS England are working closely with the local health community to monitor and manage the impact on neighbouring trusts of the temporary overnight closure of the Weston Area Health NHS Trust’s emergency department.

Detailed modelling to evaluate the potential movement of patients to other acute providers overnight both in terms of attendances and admissions was undertaken prior to the decision being taken temporarily to close Weston’s emergency department at night. The situation is being monitored on a daily basis to understand actual patient movement overnight as well as the bed occupancy of each hospital.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department of Health
Gynaecology: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the average time taken from the presentation of symptoms to a GP to the start of treatment for fibroids.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 17 July 2017

NHS England publishes monthly data on referral to treatment waiting times to monitor performance against the legal right that patients have to start consultant-led treatment within a maximum of 18 weeks from referral for non-urgent conditions. The data that are published include the proportion of patients who waited within 18 high volume specialties but not individual procedures such as fibroids or benign testicular tumours. The information requested is therefore not available.

Grouped Questions: 4655
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 July 2017
Department of Health
Tumours: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the average time taken from the presentation of symptoms to a GP to the start of treatment for benign testicular tumours.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 17 July 2017

NHS England publishes monthly data on referral to treatment waiting times to monitor performance against the legal right that patients have to start consultant-led treatment within a maximum of 18 weeks from referral for non-urgent conditions. The data that are published include the proportion of patients who waited within 18 high volume specialties but not individual procedures such as fibroids or benign testicular tumours. The information requested is therefore not available.

Grouped Questions: 4654
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has carried out to ensure that the proposed £1,000 financial assistance offered to GP practices which accept the full repairing lease contract will be sufficient to cover the legal and survey work associated with those leases.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 13 July 2017

The £1,000 + VAT offered to general practitioner practices is intended to assist with the legal fees associated with documenting a lease. The calculation is based on the fact that the ‘template’ lease has already been negotiated and agreed with NHS Property Services and the British Medical Association, which minimises negotiations with practices.

The nature of lease – either Full Repairing and Insuring or Internal Repairs – determines the level of reimbursement for the current market rent. This includes both the lease rent and an element for upkeep of the tenanted areas. This is set out in the Premises Costs Directions 2013.

Ultimately, it is for the landlord and tenant to agree the terms of any lease to suit their specific circumstances.

Grouped Questions: 4036
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to review the Carr-Hill funding formula for GP practices with atypical populations.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 13 July 2017

NHS England recognises that atypical practices with a significantly skewed patient population will not necessarily have their workload reflected through the Carr-Hill Formula. It is for this reason that NHS England is exploring the additional demands on atypical practices, testing out in the first instance, the experiences of practices that serve university populations, practices with significant number of non-English speaking patients, and practices operating within remote or isolated areas.

Commissioner guidance was published in December 2016 and further analysis of the workload implications is being undertaken.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Buildings
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of increased service charges on GP surgeries which lease their buildings from NHS Property Services.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 13 July 2017

NHS England confirmed the introduction of the market rent model, applying the property sector’s standard method of charging, to the National Health Service in January 2016. It was part of a long-planned move across the public sector to improve utilisation and value for money in property occupancy by putting publicly-owned property on a level with privately-owned alternatives.

The Department agrees that understanding the real cost of running public service buildings has benefits for tenants and the wider NHS:

- It helps the NHS understand the true cost of occupation and reflect these transparently;

- It informs decisions about the best location for services and investment; and

- It drives better and more efficient use of space.

Customer invoices should be based on accurate property information. This includes the precise amount of space used, as well as reflecting an assessment of the facilities provided for that space, e.g. cleaning, reception services and maintenance. This data was not always available in predecessor Primary Care Trust or Strategic Health Authority records.

NHS Property Services owns only a small proportion of general practitioner (GP) surgeries in England and its approach is consistent with the way those with private sector landlords are treated. The company has endeavoured to improve the quality of its property data and to negotiate and agree lease terms with customers, providing them with the assurance they require. Transparently agreeing precise occupancy details is one reason why some GPs, are

seeing their costs increase, while others have seen a reduction. NHS Property Services recognises a requirement from its customers to explain any billing changes fully and accurately. It shares their wish to make invoicing totally transparent and is focussed on this quality improvement work.

Within the Premises Cost Direction 2013 under sections 46 and 47 there is the facility for the GP to apply to NHS England for transitional funding related to large increases to service charges.

It is only by improved understanding of the true costs that better informed decisions about the best location for NHS services can be made, as well as also encouraging the most efficient use of NHS space – both of which are important elements of securing best value for taxpayers from the health service estate.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect on GP funding of the proposed full repairing leases offered to GP surgeries.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 13 July 2017

The £1,000 + VAT offered to general practitioner practices is intended to assist with the legal fees associated with documenting a lease. The calculation is based on the fact that the ‘template’ lease has already been negotiated and agreed with NHS Property Services and the British Medical Association, which minimises negotiations with practices.

The nature of lease – either Full Repairing and Insuring or Internal Repairs – determines the level of reimbursement for the current market rent. This includes both the lease rent and an element for upkeep of the tenanted areas. This is set out in the Premises Costs Directions 2013.

Ultimately, it is for the landlord and tenant to agree the terms of any lease to suit their specific circumstances.

Grouped Questions: 4033
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department of Health
General Practitioners: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on what basis the deadline of October 2017 has been set for GP surgeries to agree full repairing leases with NHS Property Services.
A
Answered by: Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 13 July 2017

The Full Repairing and Insuring Lease is a standard, recognised property industry lease and as such is put forward as a starting point in the Standard Lease Agreement agreed between NHS Property Services (NHS PS) and the British Medical Association in 2016.

NHS England has committed to a date of 30 November 2017 by which it will offer certain additional benefits to general practitioner practices which enter into a Lease. These are as follows:

- NHS England will reimburse Stamp Duty Land Tax for an initial term of up to 15 years;

- NHS England will reimburse legal fees for conveyancing up to a maximum of £1,000, plus VAT; and

- NHS England will reimburse the Management Fee for Service Charges for both 2016/17 and 2017/18.

NHS PS is working with all GP practices to facilitate outcomes which work for both parties in all cases, using the framework as outlined by NHS England.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 June 2017
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to review the effectiveness of systems of integration for asylum seekers and refugees ensuring that all those granted refugee status have the best possible opportunity for integration.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 04 July 2017

We are working towards achieving more integrated communities and creating the conditions for everyone to live and work successfully alongside one another. This includes those who are recognised as refugees or granted Humanitarian Protection.

On 5 December 2016, Dame Louise Casey published her independent review of how to boost opportunity and integration in isolated and deprived communities. The Government will bring forward plans for tackling these issues in the coming months through a new integration strategy.

Those who are granted refugee status are given access to the labour market and benefits, and are encouraged to access organisations that can assist with integration. Each local authority region has a strategic migration partnership that provides coordination and support services for those organisations working with migrants. The Home Office also provides a dedicated integration loan directly to recognised refugees. The loan is designed to help refugees integrate into UK society by offering financial support towards housing costs, employment and training.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 June 2017
Home Office
UN Convention on the Status of Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with other parties to the UN Convention on Refugees on reforming the Convention to improve its response to the global refugee crisis; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 04 July 2017

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Department for International Development and the Home Office regularly discuss refugee issues with our counterparts. We are committed to the 1951 Refugee Convention and the UK has a proud history of providing protection to those who need it. Across Government, we engage comprehensively with partners on the response to the refugee crisis.

We aim to support refugees as close to their homes as possible, to avoid dangerous journeys and enable returns in due course. We provide development and humanitarian assistance to refugees and the communities which host them. We have pledged £2.46 billion for Syria, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis.

Our resettlement programmes are focussed on the most vulnerable; we have committed to resettle 23,000 under the Syrian Vulnerable Persons and Vulnerable Children Resettlement Schemes. We are working with partners, including the UNHCR, on taking forward the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework established by the New York Declaration last September and are fully engaged in the negotiations on a UN Refugee Compact.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 June 2017
Department for Transport
Lawrence Hill Station: Disability
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the work at Lawrence Hill Station in Bristol to make that station accessible for people with mobility disabilities will be completed.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 03 July 2017

There is no set date for the completion of works at Lawrence Hill Station.

Network Rail are re-profiling the infrastructure works in and around Bristol, including Lawrence Hill Station.

No work has yet begun to make Lawrence Hill step free, however, Network Rail will be scheduling sessions later this year to develop options and to look at how best to progress this work as a choice for Government.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 27 June 2017
Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Music: Planning
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions her Department has had with the Department for Communities and Local Government on adopting the agent of change principle in planning regulations to help protect live music venues.
A
Answered by: Matt Hancock
Answered on: 03 July 2017

We are committed to supporting and promoting a thriving live music industry and grassroots music venues are an important part of this. DCMS is working closely with DCLG on the agent of change and other issues to help ensure the continued survival and growth of this vital and vibrant sector.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 June 2017
Department for International Development
Syria: Overseas Aid
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that food and medical supplies are reaching internally displaced persons in Syria; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 30 June 2017

The UK has supported the UN and international NGOs since the start of the conflict to deliver food, medical and other supplies to those in need, including internally displaced people. The UK has provided 19.7 million food rations, 6.7 million health consultations, and over 2 million vaccines to people in need across Syria. The UK continues to use its position in the UN Security Council and the International Syria Support Group to press the Assad regime and its backers to allow aid to reach those who need it, while maintaining the pressure for a political settlement to bring the suffering of the Syrian people to an end.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 June 2017
Department for International Development
Syria: Humanitarian aid
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment she has made of the humanitarian needs of the refugees in the Berm no-man's land between Syria and Jordan; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 30 June 2017

A comprehensive needs assessment has not been conducted at the Berm recently as security constraints have restricted access. However, our partners tell us that current priorities are to improve security and access to food and medical care. We welcome the progress made to enable the UN to restart deliveries of essential supplies. However, we remain concerned by delays to recent aid distributions and the low number of attendees at the UN health clinic.

We will not be making a further statement at this time.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 June 2017
Department for Education
Music: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of students in state maintained schools were (a) offered and (b) took up (i) musical instrument lessons, (ii) free or means-tested music tuition and (iii) free or means-tested access to musical instruments in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 29 June 2017

The National Curriculum sets the expectation that all pupils should be taught to play a musical instrument. Maintained schools must follow the National Curriculum; academies have greater flexibility.

The Government is investing £300 million for music education hubs in 2016 to 2020 to ensure all pupils, whatever their background, have access to a high quality music education, including learning to play musical instruments and having the opportunity to play and sing in ensembles. Hubs are also expected to ensure that clear progression routes are available and affordable to all young people and to provide an instrument loan service, with discounts or free provision for those on low incomes.

The Department does not hold the data in the format requested. The table below shows the number of pupils in Key Stages 1 to 5 that participated in music lessons that were organised by music education hubs. The data are for the 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15, which are the three most recent academic years for which data has been published.

Further data on music education hubs can be found on Arts Council England’s website: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/children-and-young-people/music-education-hubs-survey.

Access to music lessons by pupils in Key Stages 1 to 5 in England via music education hubs

Academic year

Individual singing/instrumental lessons

Singing/instrumental lessons in small groups

Singing / instrumental lessons in large groups (not including WCET)

Whole Class Ensemble Teaching (WCET)

2012/13

n/a

n/a

n/a

531,422

2013/14

n/a

n/a

n/a

596,820

2014/15

133,127

265,768

103,046

631,223

n/a = data not available Source: Music Education Hubs Survey

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 June 2017
Department for Transport
Great Western Railway Line: Electrification
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will review the decision to postpone electrification of the railway line between Bristol and Bath.
A
Answered by: Paul Maynard
Answered on: 28 June 2017

The programme of railway upgrades, including the railway line between Bristol and Bath, will continue to be subject to ongoing assessment of investment decisions.

This is so that passengers and taxpayers get maximum value and so that passenger benefits are delivered in the best way possible.

This includes consideration of what projects will be taken forward in the next rail investment period.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 June 2017
Home Office
Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will review the effect of the non-provision of documentation, such as National Insurance numbers, on destitution among people who have been granted refugee status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 28 June 2017

Asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute are supported by the Home Office. If they are granted refugee status this support ends 28 days later because they are now allowed to work and can apply for mainstream welfare benefits.

They are also provided with a Biometric Residence Permit and National Insurance Number to help them access these benefits. We are working closely with the Department for Work and Pensions to ensure that newly recognised refugees are able to swiftly access benefits and employment support services.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 June 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent steps he has taken to secure the release of Nazanin Zaghari-Radcliffe from prison and the return of her daughter to the UK.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 28 June 2017

The Prime Minister, my Rt Hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), has raised our strong concerns for Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe with Iranian President Rouhani several times, most recently on 24 May. The Foreign Secretary has also raised our concerns. I will continue to remind the Iranian authorities of these concerns, as I did in a phone call with the Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister on 21 June. We remain ready to facilitate Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's daughter's return to the UK if requested.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 April 2017
Home Office
Deportation: Iraq
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what arrangements are in place between the Government and the Government of Iraq for removing, by charter flight to Iraq, people who have been refused asylum in the UK.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 27 April 2017

There are no current plans for a charter flight returns operation to Iraq.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 March 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Land Use
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2017 to Question 5198, on housing: construction, what the sources are of the independent estimates of land ownership referred to.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 18 April 2017

The analysis comes from Savills (2016) and is based on land registered with Land Registry. The report is indicative of the magnitude of local government land ownership, including all registered operational land in the public sector. The report is available from Savills via the following link:

http://www.savills.co.uk/research_articles/141280/202113-0

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 March 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Land Use: Bristol
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2017 to Question 51988, what proportion of that Government land which is planned for release for building homes is within Bristol; what proportion of land in Bristol is owned by Government departments; and how much of that land so owned is suitable for the building of homes.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 18 April 2017

As set out in the Public Land for Housing Annual Report, by 30 September 2016 the total housing capacity of land either identified for sale or already sold by all departments contributing to the programme was 145,492, against a target of 160,000 units. A total of 101 of these units are in Bristol. This does not include local authority owned land.

Cabinet Office records show that central government owns 945 hectares of freehold land and buildings in Bristol, comprising of 145 separate sites. This represents 2.3 per cent of land in the area.

Not all of this is surplus and it would be for the local planning authority to determine what land is suitable for housing.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 March 2017
Women and Equalities
Gender Recognition: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 20 March 2017 to Question 68173, whether the review into the de-medicalising and streamlining of the Gender Recognition Act 2004 will include the effect of self-definition on (a) women's refuges, (b) women's health services, (c) women-only sports groups, (d) commissioning for specialist clinical services and emotional support for transgender people and (e) commissioning for clinical responses to and health-related research on illnesses which predominantly or solely affect men or women.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 18 April 2017

The Government is dedicated to promoting the equal rights of women and of transgender individuals.

In our work to review the Gender Recognition Act we are monitoring the implementation of alternative gender recognition processes in other jurisdictions and we are analysing the evidence placed before the Women and Equalities Committee. We are considering single-sex and other public services as part of the review.

All public authorities have to comply with the requirements of the Equality Act 2010 and the Public Sector Equality Duty in the development of policy, commissioning and provision of services. This includes paying due regard not only to the needs of men and women but also transgender individuals. We will comply with these requirements in all our work.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 27 March 2017
Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Charitable Donations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the effect on charitable donations of the Information Commissioner's Office investigation into wealth screening by fundraising services.
A
Answered by: Mr Rob Wilson
Answered on: 03 April 2017

The Information Commissioner’s Office’s investigations into charities’ fundraising practices, including wealth screening, have focused on non-compliance with the Data Protection Act 1998 and the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003. We have not made an assessment of any effect on charitable donations resulting from compliance with existing law.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 27 March 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what correspondence he has had with leaders of Core Cities on the negotiations for the UK to leave the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 30 March 2017

The Government has been clear that we will not provide a running commentary on negotiations and the department has no plans to change policy regarding publication of correspondence. DExEU is regularly engaging with leaders of local government and cities.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 27 March 2017
Department of Health
Chronic Illnesses: Employment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress the Work and Health Unit has made in assessing the extent of possible barriers to employment for people with (a) myalgic encephalomyelitis and (b) other chronic fluctuating conditions.
A
Answered by: Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 30 March 2017

The Government wants all disabled people and people with a long term health condition to have the opportunity to work and share in the economic and health benefits that work brings, including people with myalgic encephalomyelitis and other chronic fluctuating conditions. That is why we published ‘Improving Lives the Work: Health and Disability Green Paper’ to set out the action we plan to take to achieve this and start a far-reaching, national debate on what more we can do to ensure everyone is supported to reach their full potential.

We held a public consultation on the Green Paper between 31 October and 17 February 2017. We are now considering over 4,000 consultation responses and the next steps for reform.

Government support to employers to help them recruit and retain disabled people and people with health conditions includes the Disability Confident campaign, the Access to Work scheme and the Fit for Work service. Following the Green Paper, we are now considering what more should be done.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 March 2017
Church Commissioners
Churches: Yoga
Commons
To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what guidance is issued to churches on allowing church premises to be used for yoga classes.
A
Answered by: Dame Caroline Spelman
Answered on: 23 March 2017

The Church of England takes a flexible approach to yoga classes in church halls, with decisions left to the discretion of the local Parochial Church Council. Advice and guidance is available for parishes that are considering hiring their church hall out, which can be found here https://www.churchofengland.org/media/59302/NRM%20guidance.doc

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 March 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Ivory: Sales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government's proposed consultation on the domestic ivory trade will commence.
A
Corrected answer by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Corrected on: 22 March 2017
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 22 March 2017.
The correct answer should have been:

We intend to consult on our proposals on ivory this year.

We will be consulting on our proposals in this area shortly.

A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 22 March 2017

We intend to consult on our proposals on ivory this year.

We will be consulting on our proposals in this area shortly.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 March 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Pensions: Females
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps the Government is taking to encourage more women to enrol in pensions at a younger age.
A
Answered by: Richard Harrington
Answered on: 27 March 2017

Automatic enrolment was designed specifically to help those underrepresented in pension saving - including women.

And encouragingly, in 2015 for the first time the proportion of eligible women (70%) participating in private sector workplace pensions was greater than the proportion of eligible men (69%).

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 March 2017
Home Office
Asylum: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2017 to Question 65067, on asylum: children, how many places offered by local authorities for unaccompanied child asylum-seekers remained unfilled in each local authority as at 7 March 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 20 March 2017

We are very grateful for the way in which local authorities have stepped up to provide places for unaccompanied asylum seeking children under the National Transfer Scheme and we will continue to work closely with local authorities to increase participation. All offers of placements for unaccompanied asylum seeking children will be used to fulfil our existing commitments including ensuring a fairer distribution of children between local authorities.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 March 2017
Women and Equalities
Gender Recognition: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2017 to Question 64967, on gender recognition: health services, which single-sex services will be considered as part of the Government's review of the Gender Recognition Act 2004; and when the Government plans that review to commence.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 20 March 2017

In the Government’s response to the Women and Equalities Select Committee inquiry into transgender equality, we committed to reviewing the Gender Recognition Act to determine whether changes can be made to improve it in order to streamline and de-medicalise the gender recognition process. The internal review is already underway.

As part of this work, we are monitoring the implementation of alternative gender recognition processes in other jurisdictions and analysing the evidence placed before the Committee; this will inform our consideration of single-sex services as part of the review.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 March 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Social Security Benefits: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2017 to Question 63202, on jobcentres: refugees, and with reference to his Department's internal review in 2016, what the reasons were for refugees not applying for benefits sufficiently early to enable their benefit claim to be processed before their asylum assistance ceased; and what steps are being taken in the Government's pilot project to alleviate or prevent those reasons arising.
A
Answered by: Damian Hinds
Answered on: 20 March 2017

There are many reasons as to why a refugee, once granted status, may not immediately make a claim to benefit.

The process we are currently piloting involves a facilitated transfer for those who have been granted leave to remain in the UK, from asylum support to mainstream welfare provision, encouraging them to make contact with DWP at the earliest opportunity.

The pilot has been extended until the end of March 2017 and will then be evaluated to determine if this additional support has resulted in an application to benefits being received sufficiently early to enable it to be processed before the refugee’s asylum support ceases.

DWP will write to the Work and Pensions Select Committee with an update later this year.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 February 2017
Home Office
Further Education: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer given by the Prime Minister to Question 58 at the Liaison Committee meeting on 20 December 2016, how many colleges have ceased to operate since 2010 because they have been found to be not offering an education; and if she will place a list of those colleges in the Library.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 28 February 2017

The number of educational institutions which have had their Tier 4 sponsor licence revoked between 1 May 2010 and up to 7 October 2014 is available and can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tier-4-sponsors-whose-status-appeared-as-revoked-from-2010-to-2014

This means that these institutions cannot bring in non-EEA students to study in the UK under the Tier 4 route. The Home Office is planning to publish up to date data shortly.

Revoking an institution’s Tier 4 sponsor licence does not prevent them from operating.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 22 February 2017
Home Office
Asylum: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what consultation her Department has had with local authorities on the number of unaccompanied refugee children to be resettled as required by the Immigration Act 2016; how many local authorities have (a) responded and (b) not responded to those consultations; and of those that have responded how many have said they (i) can place a child or children and (ii) cannot place any children.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 28 February 2017

In accordance with the Immigration Act 2016 the Government conducted a comprehensive consultation with local authorities across the UK in order to assess capacity for the care of unaccompanied children. On 13 May 2016, the then Immigration Minister wrote to all local authorities to provide an update on the launch of the National Transfer Scheme (NTS) and to encourage local authorities to participate in all schemes designed for children. On 7 June 2016, the then Immigration Minister, the Minister for Vulnerable Children and Families and the then Minister with responsibility for Syrian Refugees attended a national launch event in London which was attended by local authorities from across the UK. This was followed by regional events in England and in Scotland and Wales.

On 8 September last year, the Immigration Minister wrote to all local authorities in England, Wales and Scotland asking them to confirm how many places they could offer to accommodate unaccompanied asylum seeking children. Home Office officials also maintained an ongoing dialogue with individual local authorities and regional Strategic Migration Partnerships throughout.

This is a voluntary scheme whereby local authorities sign up to accept unaccompanied asylum seeking children on a voluntary basis.

We asked local authorities to consider carefully whether they have the infrastructure and support networks needed to ensure the appropriate care of these unaccompanied children before participating in the NTS.


Our consultation with local authorities indicated that there was capacity for an additional 400 UASC. This is in addition to the unaccompanied children already in local authority care. We estimate that at least 50 of the family reunion cases will require a local authority placement in circumstances where the reunion does not work out.We estimate that at least 50 of the family reunion cases transferred from France as part of the Calais clearance will require a local authority placement in cases where the family reunion does not work out.We estimate that at least 50 of the family reunion cases transferred from France as part of the Calais clearance will require a local authority placement in cases where the family reunion does not work out.

Every region in England is participating in the NTS and we are working very closely with local authorities in Scotland and Wales who have also responded positively.

It is for individual local authorities to decide the number of children they are able to accommodate but we continue to work with those not currently participating in the NTS to support them to do so at the earliest opportunity.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 February 2017
Home Office
Refugees: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the written statement of 8 February 2017, HCWS467, what estimate she and her counterparts in Europe have made of the number of unaccompanied child asylum seekers in Europe (a) not in care of national authorities, (b) without official protection and (c) otherwise at large; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 27 February 2017

The European Commission has recently published the ninth report on relocation and resettlement which includes estimates of the number of unaccompanied children currently in Europe. The report can be found here: https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20170208_ninth_report_on_relocation_and_resettlement_en.pdf

The Government has a clear strategy for addressing the migration crisis; we invest significantly in upstream interventions and we resettle the most vulnerable directly from the affected regions, including children. We are clear that we do not want to incentivise perilous journeys across Europe, particularly by the most vulnerable children. That is why we have committed to resettle 20,000 Syrian nationals through the Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme and 3,000 of the most vulnerable children and family members under the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme over the course of this Parliament.

The UK has established a £10 million Refugee Children’s Fund to support the needs of vulnerable refugee and migrant children arriving in Europe.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 February 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fisheries: Conditions of Employment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to strengthen the accreditation scheme for fishing vessels to ensure no-one is employed in conditions of slavery.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 27 February 2017

Seafish, the UK-wide levy-funded Non-Departmental Public Body, launched the Responsible Fishing Scheme (RFS) in January 2016. It is a voluntary vessel-based programme certifying high standards of crew welfare and responsible catching practices on fishing vessels. The RFS does not currently have the capability to audit, or the legal authority to police serious labour and human rights abuses at sea.

The RFS is overseen by an independent Oversight Board, which decided on 14 February 2017 that the health, safety & welfare elements of the standard should be strengthened and that the “crew voice” should be included in the audit methodology. This proposal will be put to the Seafish Board, as the Standard holder, for a decision at its meeting on 7 March.

If a case of modern slavery is reported or suspected at sea, within UK territorial waters, the police will investigate as they would any other criminal offence. The Modern Slavery Act gave law enforcement agencies, including the police and Border Force, new powers to investigate modern slavery offences at sea, including the power to stop, board, divert, detain and search a vessel, and to make arrests and seize any relevant evidence.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 February 2017
Women and Equalities
Gender Recognition: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what research has been conducted on the effect of men self-defining as women on (a) women-only services, (b) organisations solely for girls and young women, (c) health commissioning for conditions which are sex-specific and (d) healthcare and other services for people who are transitioning from one sex to another.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 27 February 2017

This Government has rightly raised the profile of transgender equality in the past few years as many transgender people still encounter prejudice and discrimination. However, this focus has not been to the detriment to women. The Government is dedicated to promoting the equal rights of women and of transgender individuals.

The Government Equalities Office in November 2015 issued “Providing services for transgender customers: a guide” which sets out guidance and good practice examples on the provision of services to trans individuals. It also aims to help service providers comply with the law.

All public authorities, including NHS England, have to comply with the requirements of the Equality Act 2010 and the Public Sector Equality Duty in the development of policy, commissioning and provision of services. This includes paying due regard not only to the needs of men and women but also trans individuals.

While the Government Equalities Office has not commissioned specific research on the access of trans individuals to gender specific services, this will be considered as part of our review into the demedicalising and streamlining of the Gender Recognition Act.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 February 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Magnox: Pensions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to protect Magnox workers affected by reforms to final salary pension schemes across the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Estate.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 27 February 2017

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) is undertaking a consultation with its workforce on potential options for pension reform, after which the NDA will take account of the consultation responses and make proposals for the Government to consider. The NDA estate is part of the public sector, as classified by the Office of National Statistics, in that it receives over £2bn of funding from the UK taxpayer every year.

The Government recognises the unique context that Site Licence Companies and their workforces operate in. During the consultation period the NDA have continued to lead discussions with the Trade Unions on the best approach to pension reform; one that balances the legitimate concerns of taxpayers about the present and future costs of pension commitments, with the workforce’s concern to maintain levels of retirement income for people who have dedicated their working lives to the nuclear decommissioning industry.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 February 2017
Home Office
Refugees: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her oral contribution of 9 February 2017 on unaccompanied child refugees, Official Report, columns 637-652, what the evidential basis is for her determination that the need for the scheme arising from the Dubs assessment has ceased.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 22 February 2017

Under the Immigration Act we made a commitment to transfer a specified number of unac-companied refugee children to the UK. On February 8, the Government announced that we will transfer the specified number of 350 children to the UK under section 67 of the Immigra-tion Act following consultation with local authorities on capacity. This includes the more than 200 children already transferred under section 67 from France as part of the UK’s support for the Calais camp clearance.


The Government has a clear strategy for addressing the migration crisis; we invest signifi-cantly in upstream interventions and we resettle the most vulnerable directly from the affected regions, including children. It is right to focus our efforts on resettling refugees from the region, and thereby avoiding perilous journeys to Europe, particularly by the most vulnerable children. That is why we have committed to resettle 20,000 Syrian nationals through the Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme and 3,000 of the most vulnerable children and family members under the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme over the course of this Parliament.


We will continue to meet our obligations under the Dublin Regulation. Furthermore, the UK has established a £10 million Refugee Children’s Fund to support the needs of vulnerable refugee and migrant children arriving in Europe.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 February 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Jobcentres: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to page 10 of the Government response to the Work and Pensions Committee report on Benefit Delivery, published on 12 July 2016, HC 522, what evaluation his Department has carried out on changes to guidance for jobcentre staff handling claims from refugees; and when he plans to publish the findings of that evaluation.
A
Answered by: Damian Hinds
Answered on: 09 February 2017

The Department carried out an internal review in 2016. This confirmed the findings of an earlier DWP/Home Office review into why a significant number of asylum seeking refugees who are granted leave to remain, do not have benefits in payment at the end of their 28 day period of asylum support. The key finding was that they do not contact DWP early enough to enable their benefit claim to be processed before Home Office support ends.

These internal reviews are informing a DWP/Home Office pilot of an assisted transition from asylum support to benefits. The Department will write to the Work and Pensions Select Committee with an update later this year.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 November 2016
Department for Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps the Government is taking to release more publicly-owned land to local authorities for the building of homes.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 01 February 2017
Holding answer received on 14 November 2016

Through its public sector land programme, the government plans to dispose of sufficient land for 160,000 homes over the course of this Parliament. Local authority land has the potential to make a real difference to local housing supply. For example, independent estimates suggest that a third of the land in Bristol is owned by local government bodies, and, although not all of this land will be suitable for development, this does offer potential to unlock land to help increase housing supply.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 24 January 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Written Questions: Government Responses
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 14 November 2016 to Question 51988, on housing construction; when he plans to provide an Answer to that Question.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 01 February 2017

I replied to the hon Member for Bristol West today.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 January 2017
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Furs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of (a) extending the ban on the sale of cat, dog and seal fur to other species and (b) improving guidance on fur labelling for consumer products; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 31 January 2017

Some skin and fur products may never be legally imported into the UK for commercial use. These include seal skins and products and cat and dog fur and products.

If the fur is from an endangered species protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), its import and trade will be subject to CITES controls, as will any body part of that species also being imported or traded. These controls are implemented by the EU Wildlife Trade Regulations. The Government has no plans to remove these controls.

Labelling of fur products for consumers is already covered by The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 24 January 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the size is of the cap on borrowing to invest in new homes in each core city.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 30 January 2017

There was £3.4 billion of borrowing headroom in 2015-16.

You can find the last published information on borrowing headroom for each local authority in 2014-15 in: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/local-authority-capital-expenditure-and-receipts-in-england-2014-to-2015-final-outturn

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 January 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Bristol West
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 14 December 2016 to Question 56753, what mechanisms the national funding formula will use to account for the cost pressures which schools face.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 30 January 2017

The Government places a high priority on education, recognising its importance to productivity and social mobility. At the 2015 Spending Review the overall envelope for schools funding to 2019-20 was set, taking into account anticipated new costs on schools. At the Spending Review, the core schools budget[1] was protected in real terms - as a result, throughout this Parliament, the money available for our schools will increase as pupil numbers rise.

The new, fairer National Funding Formula will ensure that the resources allocated at the Spending Review is distributed fairly, consistently and transparently across the country to match school and pupil need. This will end the current system where pupils and schools in identical circumstances attract differing funding levels due to where they live.

We are also committed to providing support for schools to make the most of their money. In January, we published a wide range of tools and support available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/schools-financial-health-and-efficiency, and we recently launched a school buying strategy to support schools to save over £1bn a year by 2019-20 on their non-staff spend.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/spending-review-and-autumn-statement-2015-documents

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 January 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Aerospace Industry
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to build on the UK's strengths in aerospace innovation and manufacturing before and after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 30 January 2017

The Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has allocated £1.95bn to 2026 to co-fund aerospace related R&D activities: 160 technology projects worth £1.3 billion are currently under way, spanning wings, engines, aero structures and advanced systems. This involves 195 different companies and organisations, including over 100 SMEs. In addition the Government is also helping the sector develop its supply chain by investing £80m in the Sharing in Growth supply chain performance improvement programme; the lead 43 companies have already won in excess of £1.4 billion of contracts as a result of this work. The Government also supports the National Aerospace Technology Exploitation programme to help SMEs innovate, develop and market technology.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 January 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Aerospace Industry
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the contribution of the aerospace industry to economic growth in the (a) South West and (b) UK.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 30 January 2017

The aerospace sector has an annual turnover of around £30 billion, supporting 113,000 direct, high-skilled jobs across the UK, 22,400 of them in the South West. Average salary levels, at £38,600, are over 35% higher than the national average. Between 2009 and 2015, productivity growth has been six times more than the whole economy.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 January 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Aerospace Industry
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that the aerospace sector remains globally competitive after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 30 January 2017

The UK will continue its longstanding support for the aerospace sector, including co-funding £1.95bn to 2026 for research and development activities, and a number of other measures to support the UK supply chain.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 January 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Aerospace Industry
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that companies in the aerospace supply chain benefit from increasing aircraft orders before and after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 30 January 2017

Officials are working closely with the UK aerospace industry to understand the impacts and opportunities of leaving the EU. The Government is investing £80m in the Sharing in Growth supply chain performance improvement programme; the lead 43 companies have already won in excess of £1.4 billion of contracts as a result of this work. The Government also supports the National Aerospace Technology Exploitation Programme, which help SMEs innovate, develop and market technology. The Government has also supported industry development of the Supply Chain Competitiveness Charter, where larger aerospace companies commit to share growth opportunities with suppliers in return for continued improvement in their operational performance.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 24 January 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 14 November 2016 to Question 51987, whether he plans to review his Department's policy on borrowing caps on local authorities' housing revenue accounts.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 27 January 2017

We will shortly be publishing a Housing White Paper, which will set out our thoughts about how we can help local authorities to build more homes.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 January 2017
Department for Education
Children: Day Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 November 2016 to Question 53754, on early years funding, when the Department expects to publish the results of the consultation referred to in that Answer.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 27 January 2017

I refer the hon. Member to the Secretary of State’s Written Ministerial Statement, Early Years Education (HCWS306), on 1 December, which can be found at: http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2016-12-01/HCWS306/

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 24 January 2017
Home Office
Police: Stun Guns
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance and training her Department recommends that police forces provide for officers on the use of tasers.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 27 January 2017

The deployment of Conductive Energy Devices is an operational matter for Chief Officers. The College of Policing sets standards of practice and guidance, including on the use of the Taser X26, and is the professional body for those working in policing in England and Wales. The following is a link to the relevant part of the College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice: www.app.college.police.uk/app-content/armed-policing/conducted-energy-devices-taser/

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 January 2017
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 14 November 2016 to Question 52038, on staff, what the size of the trade policy team was on 24 June 2016; and how many of those staff have had experience of negotiating trade agreements.
A
Answered by: Mark Garnier
Answered on: 27 January 2017

On 24 June 2016 the trade policy team numbered 45 civil servants. These individuals were all focused on UK trade policy in the context of providing input to the European Commission’s trade negotiations.

At this stage our primary focus is on developing our policy positions, international relationships and approach to future trade negotiations. We are recruiting high quality individuals with a range of policy, negotiation and trade-specific skills and experience.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 January 2017
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 16 November 2016 to Question 52038, how many members of staff with previous experience of negotiating trade agreements have been recruited since 24 June 2016.
A
Answered by: Mark Garnier
Answered on: 27 January 2017

The Trade Policy group has a strong core of trade policy officials and this has quadrupled in size since 24 June and is continuing to grow. To date, recruitment has primarily been from within the Civil Service but we are now running an external recruitment campaign.

At this stage our primary focus is on developing our policy positions, international relationships and approach to future trade negotiations. We are recruiting high quality individuals with a range of policy, negotiation and trade-specific skills and experience.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 January 2017
Department of Health
Dense Deposit Disease: Eculizumab
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 7 November 2016 to Question 51102, on Dense Deposit Disease: eculizumab, when he plans for the new policy proposition for the use of eculizumab in treating Dense Deposit Disease before a patient has had a kidney transplant to be considered during 2017; and when the Clinical Priorities Advisory Group will report on its consideration of the policy on the treatment of C3 glomerulopathy after kidney transplant.
A
Answered by: David Mowat
Answered on: 25 January 2017

The Clinical Priorities Advisory Group (CPAG) considered the policy proposition on the treatment of C3 glomerulopathy after kidney transplant in November 2016 but this was not supported, primarily on the grounds of affordability. It was agreed that this policy would be given further consideration by CPAG in spring 2017.

A policy proposition for pre-transplant patients to receive eculizumab was considered by the NHS England Specialised Commissioning Clinical Panel in December 2016. The Clinical Panel concluded there was insufficient evidence to support development of a policy and, therefore, this topic will not enter the policy work programme at this stage. NHS England will liaise with the National Institute for Health Research to discuss the potential for an international clinical group to develop an international trial.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 16 January 2017
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Employment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which private companies have used labour from the prison population, and for what roles, in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Mr Sam Gyimah
Answered on: 24 January 2017

The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

We want prisons to be places of hard work, rigorous education and high ambition, with incentives for prisoners to learn and for prison staff to prioritise education and work. We work with a significant number of private companies to provide opportunities for offenders to work and learn new skills which can help them find a job on release and support their rehabilitation. This includes supporting work in prison, providing work placements in the community on temporary licence and employment on release.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 December 2016
Home Office
Refugees: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many unaccompanied and separated children have been (a) identified, (b) assessed and (c) transferred under sub-section 1 of section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 22 December 2016

We are continuing to work closely with partners across Europe to identify unaccompanied asylum seeking children who may be eligible to come to the UK.

The Government has transferred more than 750 children to the UK in support of the French operation to clear the Calais camp, including children who meet the criteria for section 67 of the Immigration Act.

The Dubs process has not ended. More eligible children will be transferred from Europe, in line with the terms of the Immigration Act, in the coming months. Following consultation with local authorities on capacity to host unaccompanied children, we will be announcing the specified number in due course.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 December 2016
Home Office
Refugees: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) refugee children and (b) families or carers of such children have been resettled under the Vulnerable Children's Resettlement Programme since that programme began.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 20 December 2016

The Home Office is committed to publishing data in an orderly way as part of the regular quarterly Immigration Statistics, in line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. The figures for the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme (VCRS) will be published in the usual way, and will feature in future releases of the Home Office’s immigration quarterly statistics.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 December 2016
Home Office
Refugees: Greece
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) identified, (b) assessed and (c) transferred under the family unity provisions of the Dublin III Regulation from Greece to the UK since January 2016.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 19 December 2016

We will always fully consider cases passed to us under the Dublin Regulation, and have made significant progress in improving and speeding up the existing processes via Dublin especially since the beginning of the year. Any request to unite family members under the Dublin Regulation is carefully considered. Where someone seeking asylum elsewhere in the EU can demonstrate they have close family members legally in the UK, we will take responsibility for that claim. At present we do not publish data on cases covered by the Dublin Regulation. The latest release of published data on asylum can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/572374/asylum1-q3-2016-tables.ods

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 December 2016
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Crimes of Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support her Department has provided to the UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: James Wharton
Answered on: 16 December 2016

The UK has supported the Fund since 2014 providing £2 million in 2014, £2.25 million in 2015 and £3.75 million in 2016. This support helps to fund local organisations across the world to tackle violence against women, improve access to services such as legal assistance and healthcare, and strengthen laws that protect women and girls.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 06 December 2016
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Slavery
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, which organisations her Department is working with to end modern day slavery.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 14 December 2016

DFID has a key part to play in helping to end modern slavery in all its forms. Tackling modern slavery will require partnering both with countries where the problem in its various forms exists, and with a wider set of partners including other countries, multilateral organisations including the United Nations, non-governmental organisations, businesses, academia, charities and faith groups.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 06 December 2016
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Human Trafficking
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much her Department has spent on anti-human trafficking programmes in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 14 December 2016

The information about the total amount DFID has spent on anti-human trafficking in each year since 2010 is not available in the form requested. DFID is committed to tackling trafficking and exploitation and is, for example, supporting a regional “Work in Freedom” programme led by the International Labour Organisation which supports safe migration and government capacity building in Asia. The programme helps stop women and girls from being trafficked through prevention, protection and empowerment. To date it has helped provide over 90,000 women with training to help them make informed migration decisions, reducing their risk of being trafficked from India, Nepal and Bangladesh.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 December 2016
Department for Education
Schools: Bristol West
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government plans to take to protect state maintained schools in Bristol West from the effect on their budgets of rising (a) staff and (b) other costs and real-terms funding reductions in 2016-17 and in 2017-18.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 14 December 2016

The Government recognises the importance of investing in education, and at the Spending Review confirmed a real terms protection for the core schools budget. Throughout this Parliament, the money available for our schools will increase as pupil numbers rise.

As with other public services, we recognise that schools are facing cost pressures from salary increases, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases to employers’ National Insurance and Teachers’ Pension Scheme contributions and general inflation.

We are introducing a National Funding Formula to give greater certainty on funding and allow schools to plan ahead effectively. This is to ensure that resources are matched fairly and consistently across the country to school and pupil need.

We are also committed to providing support for schools to improve their levels of efficiency. In January we published a wide range of tools and support available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/schools-financial-health-and-efficiency, and we will launch a school buying strategy to support schools to save over £1bn a year by 2019-20 on their non-staff spend.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 December 2016
Home Office
Refugees: Syria
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many refugees have resettled in the UK under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme in the most recent period for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 08 December 2016

The Home Office is committed to publishing data in an orderly way as part of the regular quarterly Immigration Statistics, in line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. Latest statistics published on 01 December confirmed that a total of 4,414 Syrians have been resettled under the scheme since it began, 4,162 of these arriving in the 12 months to the end of September 2016.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 22 November 2016
Department for Communities and Local Government
Homelessness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assistance his Department provides to homeless people to help them access the private rented sector.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 30 November 2016

One person without a home is one too many and we are committed to do all we can to prevent homelessness. That is why we have increased central investment to tackle homelessness over the next four years to £149 million. At Budget 2016, we went further and announced £100 million to deliver low cost ‘move on’ accommodation to enable people leaving hostels and refuges to make a sustainable recovery from a homelessness crisis, providing at least 2,000 places for vulnerable people to enable independent living.

We made a significant investment of nearly £14 million from 2010 to 2016 for Crisis to develop a programme to help single homeless people access private rented sector accommodation. Over 9,000 people had been helped, with over 90% maintaining tenancies for at least 6 months.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department of Health
Hepatitis: Bristol West
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people in Bristol West constituency (a) he estimates have undiagnosed and (b) have diagnosed hepatitis C; and how many people who have been so diagnosed have access to the latest treatments for hepatitis C.
A
Answered by: Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 28 November 2016

There is no routine national notification system in place to capture cases diagnosed with current hepatitis C infection. However, there are a number of systems and programmes in place that provide robust information on samples of the population which allow us to generate estimates at both a national and local level.

Estimates of the number of people with undiagnosed hepatitis C are available at local authority level. The estimated number of people in the city of Bristol with current undiagnosed hepatitis C infection is approximately 750.

Information on the number of people diagnosed with hepatitis C who have access to the latest treatment is not held centrally.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department of Health
Hepatitis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 8 November 2016 to Question 51807, for what reasons access to the new treatments for hepatitis C that have been approved as cost-effective by NICE has been limited to 10,011 people in 2016-17.
A
Answered by: Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 28 November 2016

The guidance issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in relation to new direct acting antivirals for hepatitis C recommends that the decision to treat, and prescribing decisions, are made by multidisciplinary teams in the operational delivery networks put in place by NHS England. These prioritise treatment for people with the highest unmet clinical need.

NHS England’s commitment to treat 10,000 patients in 2016/17, increasing to 12,500 in 2017/18, is in line with NICE’s estimate of activity included in the costing tools published to support implementation of the guidance.

Grouped Questions: 53767
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department of Health
Hepatitis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions his Department has had with NHS England on its decision to limit the number of people able to access new hepatitis C treatments to 10,011; and on what basis that number was chosen.
A
Answered by: Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 28 November 2016

The guidance issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in relation to new direct acting antivirals for hepatitis C recommends that the decision to treat, and prescribing decisions, are made by multidisciplinary teams in the operational delivery networks put in place by NHS England. These prioritise treatment for people with the highest unmet clinical need.

NHS England’s commitment to treat 10,000 patients in 2016/17, increasing to 12,500 in 2017/18, is in line with NICE’s estimate of activity included in the costing tools published to support implementation of the guidance.

Grouped Questions: 53772
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department of Health
Hepatitis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the World Health Organisation's Global Health Sector Strategy on Viral Hepatitis, whether he plans to produce a national strategy for the elimination of hepatitis C by 2030.
A
Answered by: Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 28 November 2016

The United Kingdom has a comprehensive surveillance system in place combining laboratory diagnoses data, risk/behaviour data, outcome data, statistical modelling and service evaluation to monitor the cascade of care, detect outbreaks, and generate burden estimates. The UK already has a comprehensive national programme of screening of blood donors and blood transfusions for blood-borne viruses, including hepatitis C, to ensure safe supplies – 100% of blood donors are screened with quality assured methods. There is national guidance and legislation around infection control in healthcare settings including a policy for healthcare workers to prevent nosocomial transmission of blood-borne viruses. Prevention efforts in minimising harm in people who inject drugs is focused on access to opiate substitution therapies and needle syringe exchange programmes, and disinfection tablets in prisons.

Public Health England has published hepatitis C metrics for the report “Hepatitis C in the UK 2016 report - Working towards its elimination as a major public health threat”. The report is available at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/541317/Hepatitis_C_in_the_UK_2016_report.pdf

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department for Work and Pensions
Pensioners: British Nationals Abroad
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many UK pensioners live in (a) other EU countries, (b) Commonwealth countries and (c) the rest of the world; and how many of those people have an address in Bristol West constituency as their most recent UK residence.
A
Answered by: Richard Harrington
Answered on: 24 November 2016

The table below shows the number of pensioners in receipt of the UK State Pension living in the country groupings requested. Please note that residents in Cyprus and Malta appear in both the European Union and Commonwealth totals.

Country Group

Number of UK State Pensioners

European Union (excluding UK)

474,130

Commonwealth (excluding UK)

565,770

Rest of the world

218,580

Source: DWP Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study May 2016.

Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

The information in relation to those who reside overseas and previously lived at an address in Bristol West constituency is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department for Communities and Local Government
Licensed Premises: Noise
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps the Government plans to take (a) through guidance to property developers and local authorities and (b) otherwise to protect the capacity for nightclubs and live music venues to continue to trade when planning permission is being considered for converting existing offices nearby to residential properties.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 23 November 2016

Where permitted development rights apply, in considering the prior approval on noise for a change of use from office to residential (under Class O of Schedule 2 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015, local planning authorities will have regard to those relevant parts of the National Planning Policy Framework and supporting planning guidance on noise, as would be the case under a planning application. Prior approval may be refused where any impacts of noise from commercial premises identified are not sufficiently mitigated by the proposed measures, as consistent with national policy. Links to the National Planning Policy Framework and Guidance can be found here - http://planningguidance.communities.gov.uk/. A local planning authority cannot consider matters other than those for which their prior approval may be given, as listed in Class O.

When determining a planning application for a change of use from office to residential where permitted development rights do not apply, local planning authorities must take into account the policies and guidance listed above, and must determine the application in accordance with the development plan, unless material considerations indicate otherwise.

Separate regimes apply to licencing and statutory nuisance, which are the responsibility of the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs respectively.

Grouped Questions: 53756
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department for Communities and Local Government
Licensed Premises: Noise
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 7 November 2016 to Question 51986, what guidance the Government plans to issue to (a) local authorities, (b) nightclubs, (c) residents of existing properties and (d) property developers applying for planning permission to convert offices to residential properties on their respective rights and responsibilities in relation to noise.
A
Answered by: Gavin Barwell
Answered on: 23 November 2016

Where permitted development rights apply, in considering the prior approval on noise for a change of use from office to residential (under Class O of Schedule 2 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015, local planning authorities will have regard to those relevant parts of the National Planning Policy Framework and supporting planning guidance on noise, as would be the case under a planning application. Prior approval may be refused where any impacts of noise from commercial premises identified are not sufficiently mitigated by the proposed measures, as consistent with national policy. Links to the National Planning Policy Framework and Guidance can be found here - http://planningguidance.communities.gov.uk/. A local planning authority cannot consider matters other than those for which their prior approval may be given, as listed in Class O.

When determining a planning application for a change of use from office to residential where permitted development rights do not apply, local planning authorities must take into account the policies and guidance listed above, and must determine the application in accordance with the development plan, unless material considerations indicate otherwise.

Separate regimes apply to licencing and statutory nuisance, which are the responsibility of the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs respectively.

Grouped Questions: 53755
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department for Education
Children: Day Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding was provided from the public purse for early years (a) childcare, (b) children's centres, (c) nurseries and (d) other provisions in Bristol West constituency in 2015-16; how much such funding is allocated for (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18; and what estimate her Department has made of how many full-time equivalent places such funding supports.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 23 November 2016

Funding for the free early years entitlements is allocated on a local authority basis through the Dedicated Schools Grant. This funding covers childcare, nurseries and other early years provisions, including childcare via children’s centres. Local authorities have the freedom to determine how to fund other services delivered via their networks of children’s centres, including via the Business Rate Retention Scheme. Local authorities have the freedom to decide what children’s centre services are appropriate to meet local needs and statutory duties.

In 2015-16, the City of Bristol received £29.16m from central government for the early years entitlements (three- and four-year olds and two-year olds but not including the Early Years Pupil Premium). This funding supported 5,161 full-time equivalent places.

In 2016-17, the City of Bristol received a provisional £28.71m from central government for the early years entitlements (three- and four-year olds and two-year olds but not including the EYPP). This funding supported a provisional 5,082 full-time equivalent places.

The Government consulted earlier this year on proposals to ensure that early years funding is allocated efficiently and fairly across the country from 2017-18. Under such proposals the City of Bristol would have been allocated a provisional £32.56m from central government for the early years entitlements (three- and four-year olds including 30 hours childcare for working parents; two-year olds; and supplementary funding for maintained nursery schools). This funding would have supported a provisional 5,666 full-time equivalent places.

Government will announce a response to the consultation shortly, including 2017-18 funding for the City of Bristol.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 November 2016
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Occupied Territories: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the press release issued by the Minister for the Middle East of 3 November 2016, what further steps he plans to take in respect of the approval by the Israeli government of permits for constructing new homes in the illegal settlement of Gilo, East Jerusalem.
A
Answered by: Mr Tobias Ellwood
Answered on: 23 November 2016

​We strongly condemn Israeli settlement advancement, including recent plans for new settlements deep in the West Bank, and moves to retroactively approve unauthorised settlement outposts. These proposed actions call into question the commitment of the Israeli government to the two-state solution. We continue to raise our grave concerns about Israeli settlements with the Israeli Government. I raised our concerns about settlements with Israeli Defence Minister Lieberman during our meeting in London on 7 September 2016. ​The Foreign Secretary, my Rt Hon. Friend the Member for Uxbridge and South Ruislip (Mr Johnson), also raised our concerns over new settlements with Prime Minister Netanyahu when he met him in Jerusalem on 30 September. I issued a further statement on 16 November expressing our deep concern about the land regulation bill in the Israeli Knesset proposing to ‘legalise’ settlement outposts across the West Bank. Such outposts are currently illegal under both Israeli domestic law and international humanitarian law and should be removed entirely.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 November 2016
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade: Palestinians
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Government's press release of 14 October 2016 on the visit to the Occupied Palestinian Territories of the UK trade envoy for that region, what further steps he plans to take in order to facilitate trade by (a) people in the Palestinian Business Women's Forum and (b) other Palestinian women.
A
Answered by: Mark Garnier
Answered on: 23 November 2016

The Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy to Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT) Baroness Morris, visited the market in October. Following this there are plans to reactivate the Palestinian British Business Council to facilitate and develop trade links between the UK and the OPT including members of the Palestinian Business Women's Forum (PBWF).

The PBWF in Ramallah, with the UK government’s help, aims to host specialised speakers from the UK to educate forum members and other beneficiaries about the import and export regulations and the business environment in the UK for start-up businesses.

Further to this, the DFID-EU’s Palestinian Market Development Programme (PMDP) is a high performing programme which has helped 283 companies to develop new products and/or enter new markets. Approximately 50% of the companies assisted are women owned/managed companies.

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