Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 June 2017
Department for Education
Skilled Workers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government plans to take to prevent the potential loss of highly skilled workers in the UK after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robert Goodwill
Answered on: 15 August 2017

The Prime Minister has been clear that we want to strike an early agreement about the rights of EU citizens living in the UK, and UK citizens living in the EU and give citizens as much certainty as possible, as early as possible. The Government’s policy paper (CM 9464), which was laid before Parliament on 26 June, sets out detailed proposals on safeguarding the position of EU nationals living in the UK.

The UK will remain an open and tolerant country; one that recognises the valuable contribution migrants make to our society and welcomes those with the skills and expertise to make our nation better. After we leave the EU, we will control immigration so that we continue to attract the brightest and the best to work or study in the UK, but will manage the process properly so that our immigration system serves the national interest.

We are considering the options for our future immigration system very carefully. As part of that, it is important that we understand the impacts of different options on different sectors of the economy and the labour market. We will build a comprehensive picture of the needs and interests of all parts of the UK and look to develop a system which works for all.

Q
Asked by Ian Austin
(Dudley North)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Closures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will list the schools that opened since 2010 that have closed; and how many pupils were on the school roll in each school at the time of closing.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 15 August 2017

The current school system has delivered places where they are needed, on time, to ensure that every child has a school place, with 735,000 new school places created between 2010 and 2016.

39 schools have been opened and then closed since 2010. These are listed in the attached table. The Department does not record the number of pupils on a school roll at the time of closing.

Schools opened and closed since 2010 (Excel SpreadSheet, 14.58 KB)
Q
Asked by Diana Johnson
(Kingston upon Hull North)
Asked on: 03 July 2017
Department for Education
Teachers: Qualifications
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 14 January 2013, Official Report, column 533W, on teachers: qualifications, how many people have obtained each type of school-based qualification in (a) music, (b) drama, (c) theatre-studies and (d) art in each year since 2009-10.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 14 August 2017

The number and percentage of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 achieving[1] each type of school based qualification in (a) Music, (b) Drama, (c) Theatre studies and (d) Art for the years 2013/14 - 2015/16 are shown in the attached table. Drama and Theatre Studies are grouped together as part of the school performance tables and are therefore presented together in the data.

The percentages of the total GCSE cohort entered for each subject are included in the attached table. The GCSE cohort is defined as all pupils who entered at least one GCSE subject and consists of 603,305 pupils in 2013/14, 597,477 pupils in 2014/15 and 584,013 pupils in 2015/16.

Caution should be taken when interpreting the ‘percentage of GCSE cohort entered for Art/Music/Drama & Theatre Studies’. GCSE Art, Music and Drama & Theatre studies are categories comprising more than one subject and a pupil may have been entered for multiple subjects, whereas, the GCSE cohort figures relate to individual pupils. Therefore, this figure slightly over-estimates the number of pupils entering these subject areas.

Data for the years 2009/10 – 2012/13 are not provided because collating this information is complex due to changes in the school performance tables and a lack of published content prior to 2012[2], therefore producing this data would incur a disproportionate cost.

The number of entries to the requested subjects, and grades achieved, is published at school level as part of the ‘Key Stage 4 performance tables’ underlying data[2].

Caution should also be used when comparing this data with that provided on 14 January 2013, Official Report, column 533W[3] due to methodological changes in the intervening years.

[1] ‘Achievement’ (or a pass) has been defined as any result which does not count as a ‘Fail’ or ‘Ungraded’ for that particular qualification. For more information on the grading structures in place for the different qualifications noted, see the Ofqual register: https://register.ofqual.gov.uk/.

[2] This data is available for download from: https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/download-data by selecting the year you require and downloading ‘Key stage 4 qualification and subject data’ for that year.

[3] https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmhansrd/cm130114/text/130114w0003.htm.

2651_table (Word Document, 14.49 KB)
Q
Asked by Ian Austin
(Dudley North)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Department for Education
Schools: Closures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will list the schools that opened since 2010 that have closed in the middle of the school year; and how many pupils were on the school roll in each school at the time of closing.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 14 August 2017

The current school system has delivered places where they are needed, on time, to ensure that every child has a school place, with 735,000 new school places created between 2010 and 2016.

The 13 schools that have been opened and have since closed in the middle of a school year since 2010 are listed in the table below. The Department does not record the number of pupils on a school roll at the time of closing.

Name of School

Opening Date

Closure Date

Type of School

1. Weston Academy[1]

01/04/2012

31/12/2015

Academy Converter

2. Discovery New School

08/09/2011

03/04/2014

Free School

3. The Durham Free School

02/09/2013

31/03/2015

Free School

4. Southwark Free School

01/02/2012

09/02/2017

Free School

5. Children's Support Centre, Wivenhoe

01/01/2010

31/03/2011

PRU

6. Children's Support Centre, Hadleigh

01/01/2010

31/03/2011

PRU

7. Riverside

15/02/2010

01/02/2011

PRU

8. Clissold Park School

01/09/2010

31/12/2012

PRU

9. The KS3 Pupil Referral Unit Burley Park Centre

01/09/2010

01/05/2016

PRU

10. Manchester KS3 and 4 PRU

01/02/2011

30/04/2011

PRU

11. Riverside

03/01/2012

31/12/2013

PRU

12. North Personalised Education Centre (NPEC)

01/08/2012

01/02/2013

PRU

13. Bassetlaw Learning Centre

31/08/2012

31/12/2014

PRU

[1] Weston Academy was an existing LA Community School that converted to become an academy and then closed during the period.

Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Bath University: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the challenges facing honeybees in the UK.
A
Answered on: 18 July 2016

There are 25 species of bumblebee resident in the UK, including the short-haired bumblebee which is currently being re-introduced under Natural England’s Species Recovery Programme.

In 2014 Defra published independent research on the status of pollinators in the UK. The study identified an overall decline in wild bee diversity over the last 50 years. This concluded that bumblebee species that have become less widespread are associated with the loss of flower-rich habitat, driven by changes in agricultural land use and urbanisation.

Both Environmental Stewardship and now the new Countryside Stewardship schemes fund the provision of food and habitat for wild pollinators. The new scheme in particular incorporates a Wild Pollinator and Farm Wildlife package which provides year-round food, winter shelter and nesting places essential for pollinators.

Although honeybees face many of these environmental pressures their population is driven by the number of beekeepers willing and able to keep bees. There is some evidence that the number of beekeepers, and therefore the number of honey bees, may have increased since 2009 as more keepers are registered on the National Bee Unit’s BeeBase and with beekeeping associations.

Grouped Questions: HL945
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Bath University: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of progress towards achieving a more diverse judiciary in the last six years.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 09 August 2017

Minister Johnson, the Minister for Universities and Science, in his speech at Reform on 20 July 2017, called on the sector to put an end to increasing vice chancellor pay and provide justification for the exceptional circumstances for large pay awards to improve value for money.

He also announced that he will be issuing new guidance to the Office for Students (OfS) to use its powers to address this problem.

Universities are autonomous bodies and it is their responsibility to determine pay arrangements for their staff. However, Minister Johnson has called for action to put an end to the upward spiral in vice chancellors’ pay.

The Government’s 2017/18 grant letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) stated:

“The Government is clear that efficiency includes demonstrating restraint in senior pay and remains concerned about the substantial upwards drift in salaries of some top management. We would like to see senior leaders in the sector exercise more pay restraint.”

HEFCE issued guidance to the sector on severance pay and the remuneration of senior staff in June 2017: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2017/CL,172017/ (copy attached).

It states that governing bodies and remuneration committees should always bear in mind the principles outlined and to record clearly the rationale behind their decisions, including any divergence from the guidance.

Grouped Questions: HL950 | HL946 | HL947 | HL948 | HL949 | HL950 | HL951
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Higher Education: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many judges have been appointed in each of the past six years; and how many of those were (1) from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, (2) women, and (3) disabled.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 18 July 2016

The Government is committed to improving judicial diversity and co-ordinates this effort through the Judicial Diversity Forum, a cross-stakeholder group with representatives from the Ministry of Justice, Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC), the judiciary and legal profession.

The Judicial Diversity Forum replaced the Judicial Diversity Taskforce in 2014 as the body responsible for encouraging judicial diversity; it has implemented a number of schemes to help improve judicial diversity. Recent examples include the 100 plus Diversity and Community Relations Judges doing invaluable work with the community to expel myths about working for the judiciary and interact with schools, universities and the legal professions. There is also a Judicial Mentoring Scheme where judges volunteer to be mentors; providing invaluable advice and guidance to those from under-represented groups seeking a judicial appointment or those wishing to progress in their judicial career.

Data on judicial appointments are published regularly on gov.uk. The below figures show how many candidates were recommended by the JAC for judicial appointment in each of the past six years and how many of those were (1) from black and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, (2) women and (3) disabled. As these figures are JAC recommendations, they may include a small number of candidates that do not go on to be appointed.

  • 2010- 759 candidates were recommended out of which 75 (10%) were from BAME, 309 (41%) were women and 41 (5%) were disabled.
  • 2011- 894 candidates were recommended out of which 91 (10%) were from BAME backgrounds, 406 (45%) were women and 34 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2012- 371 candidates were recommended out of which 48 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 152 (41%) were women and 22 (6%) were disabled.
  • 2013- 572 candidates were recommended out of which 38 (7%) were from BAME backgrounds, 303 (53%) were women and 81 (14%) were disabled.
  • 2014- 312 candidates were recommended out of which 40 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 134 (43%) were women and 11 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2015- 319 candidates were recommended out of which 28 (9%) were from BAME backgrounds, 143 (45%) were women and 10 (3%) were disabled.

The Government acknowledges that within the judiciary there is an under-representation of women, those who are disabled and those from a BAME background. However, recent statistics show some improvement which suggests ongoing diversity initiatives, co-ordinated by the Forum, are beginning to have an impact:

1) 12% of judges across Courts and Tribunals under 50 years of age are from a BAME background (around 14% of the UK population are from BAME groups).

2) JAC Official Statistics from April 2015 to March 2016 showed women made up 45% of those recommended for appointment overall (140 of 308 recommendations).

Grouped Questions: HL949
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Bath University: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what resources they have provided for diversity and equality initiatives in the judiciary; and what assessment they have made of the success of those initiatives to date.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 18 July 2016

The Government is committed to improving judicial diversity and co-ordinates this effort through the Judicial Diversity Forum, a cross-stakeholder group with representatives from the Ministry of Justice, Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC), the judiciary and legal profession.

The Judicial Diversity Forum replaced the Judicial Diversity Taskforce in 2014 as the body responsible for encouraging judicial diversity; it has implemented a number of schemes to help improve judicial diversity. Recent examples include the 100 plus Diversity and Community Relations Judges doing invaluable work with the community to expel myths about working for the judiciary and interact with schools, universities and the legal professions. There is also a Judicial Mentoring Scheme where judges volunteer to be mentors; providing invaluable advice and guidance to those from under-represented groups seeking a judicial appointment or those wishing to progress in their judicial career.

Data on judicial appointments are published regularly on gov.uk. The below figures show how many candidates were recommended by the JAC for judicial appointment in each of the past six years and how many of those were (1) from black and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, (2) women and (3) disabled. As these figures are JAC recommendations, they may include a small number of candidates that do not go on to be appointed.

  • 2010- 759 candidates were recommended out of which 75 (10%) were from BAME, 309 (41%) were women and 41 (5%) were disabled.
  • 2011- 894 candidates were recommended out of which 91 (10%) were from BAME backgrounds, 406 (45%) were women and 34 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2012- 371 candidates were recommended out of which 48 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 152 (41%) were women and 22 (6%) were disabled.
  • 2013- 572 candidates were recommended out of which 38 (7%) were from BAME backgrounds, 303 (53%) were women and 81 (14%) were disabled.
  • 2014- 312 candidates were recommended out of which 40 (13%) were from BAME backgrounds, 134 (43%) were women and 11 (4%) were disabled.
  • 2015- 319 candidates were recommended out of which 28 (9%) were from BAME backgrounds, 143 (45%) were women and 10 (3%) were disabled.

The Government acknowledges that within the judiciary there is an under-representation of women, those who are disabled and those from a BAME background. However, recent statistics show some improvement which suggests ongoing diversity initiatives, co-ordinated by the Forum, are beginning to have an impact:

1) 12% of judges across Courts and Tribunals under 50 years of age are from a BAME background (around 14% of the UK population are from BAME groups).

2) JAC Official Statistics from April 2015 to March 2016 showed women made up 45% of those recommended for appointment overall (140 of 308 recommendations).

Grouped Questions: HL948
Q
Asked by Lord Ouseley
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Ministry of Justice
Higher Education: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to support the development and introduction of pre-appointment training for those from under-represented groups seeking judicial appointments.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 09 August 2017

Minister Johnson, the Minister for Universities and Science, in his speech at Reform on 20 July 2017, called on the sector to put an end to increasing vice chancellor pay and provide justification for the exceptional circumstances for large pay awards to improve value for money.

He also announced that he will be issuing new guidance to the Office for Students (OfS) to use its powers to address this problem.

Universities are autonomous bodies and it is their responsibility to determine pay arrangements for their staff. However, Minister Johnson has called for action to put an end to the upward spiral in vice chancellors’ pay.

The Government’s 2017/18 grant letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) stated:

“The Government is clear that efficiency includes demonstrating restraint in senior pay and remains concerned about the substantial upwards drift in salaries of some top management. We would like to see senior leaders in the sector exercise more pay restraint.”

HEFCE issued guidance to the sector on severance pay and the remuneration of senior staff in June 2017: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2017/CL,172017/ (copy attached).

It states that governing bodies and remuneration committees should always bear in mind the principles outlined and to record clearly the rationale behind their decisions, including any divergence from the guidance.

Grouped Questions: HL947 | HL946 | HL947 | HL948 | HL949 | HL950 | HL951
Q
Asked on: 04 July 2016
Department for Transport
Higher Education: Pay
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect High Speed Two (HS2) Ltd to have completed its report on the potential maximisation of rail use for the handling of spoil and construction materials.
A
Answered on: 12 July 2016

An initial study has been undertaken to explore how to maximise, as far as reasonably practicable, the movement of material by rail at Euston. The study highlights a number of technical options which are now being assessed in detail with respect to their impact on passengers, their environmental and socio-economic impacts, and impacts on the HS2 programme. An initial decision on how to proceed will be made following the completion of this further assessment which is expected to be in advance of the HS2 Select Committee in the House of Lords hearing petitions in relation to Euston.

Q
Asked by Stephen Kerr
(Stirling)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Small Businesses: Scotland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Scottish Government on strategic initiatives to support small businesses in Scotland; and what the agreed steps to be taken were at those discussions.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017
Holding answer received on 17 July 2017

As set out in my responses to PQ 411 and PQ 2586 the UK and Scottish Governments have been in discussion at both ministerial and official levels.

Business support in Scotland is largely devolved however, the department engages with all the devolved regions on a number of initiatives aimed at supporting small businesses. Government programmes, backed by the British Business Bank (BBB), the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme (EFGS) and Innovate UK are investing over £700m to support around 4,500 Scottish companies including: -

  • BBB programmes are currently facilitating approximately £405m of finance in Scotland.
  • Over 2,600 loans totalling over £15m via the Start-Up Loans programme. The Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme is currently facilitating over £61m of finance to 700 businesses in Scotland.
  • The Investment Programme is currently facilitating over £214m of finance to over 1,000 businesses.
  • Innovate UK is committed to support some 206 innovation projects and to invest £28.8m.
Q
(Don Valley)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Iron and Steel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of how much steel required for the construction of High Speed 2 will be sourced in the UK.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017

It is anticipated that around two million tonnes of steel will be used across the HS2 programme. Last December, the Government issued updated guidance to public sector contracting authorities on how to ensure that they take full account of the value provided by UK steel producers when conducting their procurement activities.

To maximise British involvement in supply chain opportunities HS2 has engaged extensively with businesses of all sizes from a diverse range of sectors and across the UK; also working closely with UK Steel, British Constructional Steel Association, the Galvanisers Association and the Confederation of British Metalforming.

HS2 Ltd’s recently announced successful Main Works Contractor Tenderers have all confirmed they will comply with works information and further the requirements and spirit of HM Government Procurement Guidance on steel. HS2 will continue to engage with any British business that is interested in supporting its supply chain, throughout the lifetime of the programme.

This level of detail builds upon the work this Government has achieved in publishing details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects which shows how the Government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. This steel-specific pipeline complements the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline, which set out over £500 billion worth of planned private and public investment.

Q
(Don Valley)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Iron and Steel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to encourage UK companies to buy British steel.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017

We have commissioned independent research into future market opportunities for UK steel, which has involved substantial dialogue with existing and potential steel consumers across the whole of the UK. We are actively encouraging the UK steel sector to identify the capabilities it will need to act on the findings, and use this information to ensure they are well placed to plan and bid for future work.

This is further complemented by the Government publishing details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects which shows how the government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. This steel-specific pipeline further builds upon the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline, which set out over £500 billion worth of planned private and public investment; both which enable UK companies to anticipate material demand.

Q
(Don Valley)
Asked on: 18 July 2017
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Iron and Steel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether pipeline data will be made available to UK steel producers who may wish to meet steel requirements for High Speed 2; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 August 2017

All of the procurement details specifically for HS2’s current and future pipeline of direct contracts are publically available via the HS2 Contract Opportunities Table, on the HS2 website. The HS2 Contracts Opportunity Table is a live document which is updated weekly, identifying the procurement status for each contract, including contact details to facilitate dialogue with potential bidders.

Additionally, this shows where organisations have been shortlisted and awarded, ensuring suppliers are appropriately informed regarding procurement and the programmes, and enabling sub Tier 1 contractors a direct access route into organisations that have been awarded work on the HS2 programme.

This level of detail builds upon the Government’s published details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects which shows how the Government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. This steel-specific pipeline complements the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline, which set out over £500 billion worth of planned private and public investment.

Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
UK Border Force: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff were operational at the Border Force (a) Intelligence South East and Europe (Folkestone), (b) Intelligence Hub (Dover), (c) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Sheffield), (d) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Croydon), (e) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Solihull) and (f) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Glasgow) in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 08 August 2017

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

Grouped Questions: 5429
Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 17 July 2017
Home Office
UK Border Force: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many intelligence personnel were employed by Border Force in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 08 August 2017

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

Grouped Questions: 5189
Q
Asked by Kate Hollern
(Blackburn)
Asked on: 22 June 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Tenancy Agreements: Domestic Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to set out the circumstances under which local authorities may exercise discretion in transferring lifetime tenancies for those seeking escape from domestic violence.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017

Domestic abuse is a devastating crime and we are determined to ensure that women, regardless of their circumstances, should receive the support they need when they need it.

Our Manifesto included a commitment to ensure that those who have a lifetime tenancy and flee domestic violence are able to secure a new lifetime tenancy automatically. We are currently working on how we can deliver this, and an announcement will be made in due course.

We have already acted to put measures in place to support victims of domestic abuse. These include the securing of a dedicated fund totalling £40 million over four years (2016 - 2020), building on the £13.5 million provided between 2014 and 2016. The funding will provide provision for refuges and other specialist accommodation-based services to support victims of domestic abuse and service reform. On the 3 November 2016 we published our new ‘Priorities for Domestic Abuse Services’, developed with partners from the domestic abuse sector, which sets out for the first time what local areas need to do to ensure an effective response to meeting the needs of all domestic abuse victims.

Q
Asked by Alex Burghart
(Brentwood and Ongar)
Asked on: 28 June 2017
Department for Education
Students: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost of abolishing university tuition fees.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 07 August 2017

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) has estimated that abolishing tuition fees would increase the fiscal deficit for the 2017/18 student cohort by around £11bn, with the long-term cost of student funding increasing by around £6.5bn.

The major reforms to English higher education in 2012 have significantly increased average per-student funding. Graduates do not start repaying loans until their annual incomes reach £21,000, and loans are written off after 30 years.

By enabling English universities to charge current tuition fees, the Government no longer has to ration access to higher education via a cap on student numbers. This enables it to offer more places, including to young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, who are now going to university at a record rate – they are 43% morelikely to go to university 43%more likely to go to university than they were in 2009.*

Graduates earn, on average, substantially more than people with A levels who did not go to university.

Various pieces of research show that Higher Education graduates earn, on average, at least £100,000 more over their lifetimes than those without a degree but with 2 or more A-Levels. The most recent BIS commissioned research shows that, on average, a male graduate could expect to earn £170,000 more and a female graduate £250,000 more over their lifetimes, than someone without a degree but with 2 or more A-levels, net of tax and other costs (2012 prices).

Abolishing tuition fees would be socially regressive: as well as unfairly burdening the general taxpayer, it would benefit mainly those students going on to well-paid jobs, who repay their loans in full.

*https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201617/ldselect/ldsecleg/92/9207.htm

Q
(East Renfrewshire)
Asked on: 10 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Antisemitism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions the Government has had with the Scottish Government about the Government's proposals to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017

We have had no discussions with the Scottish Government about that Government’s adoption of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism. However, we welcome the recent decision of the Scottish Government to accept the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism, following discussions between them and the Board of Deputies of British Jews.

Q
Asked by Ms Karen Buck
(Westminster North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Communities and Local Government
Homelessness: Social Rented Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what proportion of nominations to (a) local authorities and (b) registered social landlord properties were homeless households in each of the last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Mr Marcus Jones
Answered on: 07 August 2017
Holding answer received on 17 July 2017

DCLG collects information on allocations of social housing through the COntinuous REcording of social housing lettings and sales (CORE). Table 3g of the published summary tables, available at the link below, provides the percentage of all local authority and private registered provider lettings where the tenant had been statutorily homeless prior to the letting. This is broken down for general needs, social and affordable rented and supported housing lettings.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/social-housing-lettings-in-england-april-2015-to-march-2016

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