GCSE:Written question - 26257

Q
Asked by Ian Austin
(Dudley North)
Asked on: 08 February 2016
Department for Education
GCSE
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of pupils who achieved five A* to C grades at GCSE in each of the last five years received an A* to C grade in (a) a modern foreign language and (b) science.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 24 February 2016

The table below provides information for the percentage of pupils that achieved five A* to C grades at GCSE in each year from 2010/11 to 2013/14 who received an A* to C grade in a modern foreign language (MFL) or in each of the science pathways[1]. Data for 2014/15 has not yet been finalised.

Of those pupils[2] who achieved 5 or more GCSEs or equivalent at grade A* to C in the relevant year

Pupils who achieved 5 or more GCSEs or equivalent at grade A* to C

Percentage achieving a modern foreign language[3] GCSE at grade A* to C

Percentage achieving Core and additional science[4] GCSE at grade A* to C

Percentage achieving Separate science[5] GCSE at grade A* to C

2010/11

499,057

35.9

33.0

24.6

2011/12

508,228

35.0

30.7

26.9

2012/13

517,388

40.7

29.1

26.4

2013/14

394,752

51.2

42.1

29.6

[1] Note that separate figures are provided for the core science and triple award science pathways. Information is not provided for double award science due to low numbers of entries.

[2] Based on pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each year.

[3] Based on the highest grade achieved in any modern foreign language GCSE - if pupils achieved two or more languages and achieved different grades then they only appear once in the figures.

[4] Figures include only those pupils who entered and achieved the core science pathway (having entered core and additional science and have achieved an A*-C in both) and are based on the highest grade achieved in either of the component subjects.

[5] Figures include only those pupils who entered and achieved the separate science pathway (having entered three of biology, chemistry, physics and computer science and having achieved A*-C in two of them) and are based on the highest grade achieved in any of the component subjects.

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