Science: Teachers:Written question - 216418

Q
Asked by Kevin Brennan
(Cardiff West)
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Asked on: 28 November 2014
Department for Education
Science: Teachers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of secondary school (a) chemistry teachers hold a chemistry degree, (b) physics teachers hold a physics degree and (c) maths teachers hold a maths degree in each region of England.
A
Answered by: Mr David Laws
Answered on: 03 December 2014

The following table shows the proportions of secondary school chemistry, physics and mathematics teachers holding degrees or higher in those subjects in each region.

The table also shows, for England only, the percentage of teachers with a relevant post A level qualification in chemistry, physics and mathematics. This measure includes teachers who have trained in these subjects either via degrees or other relevant qualification routes (eg the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)).

Proportions of secondary school chemistry, physics and maths teachers holding degrees or higher in the relevant subjects which they teach, English regions, November 2013

Chemistry

Physics

Mathematics

%

Confidence
Interval (+/-)[1]

%

Confidence
Interval (+/-)[1]

%

Confidence
Interval (+/-)[1]

North East

74

7

60

9

47

3

North West

66

4

53

5

49

2

Yorkshire and the Humber

73

4

56

6

45

2

East Midlands

66

5

60

6

48

3

West Midlands

67

4

56

5

41

2

East of England

63

4

49

5

44

2

Inner London

66

7

59

9

48

3

Outer London

64

4

57

5

48

2

South East

62

4

55

4

43

2

South West

59

5

61

5

44

2

England

65

1

56

2

45

1

England (including all relevant post A level qualifications)

76

1

66

2

78

1

Source: School Workforce Census

[1] Confidence intervals have been calculated around the proportions as not all secondary schools were able to submit curriculum information, and not all qualifications returns were complete. The confidence intervals show the statistical accuracy for the data, and give a range within which we can be reasonably sure (95% certain) that the true value actually lies.

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