Immigration Bill returns to the Lords

11 May 2016

The Immigration Bill returned to the House of Lords on Tuesday 10 May for consideration of Commons changes in 'ping pong'

Lords members considered proposed MPs changes on the detention of immigrants, the consideration of bail and the treatment of pregnant women.

No further changes were made and the bill now waits for Royal Assent when it will become law.

Consideration of Commons amendments: Tuesday 26 April

Lords members considered MPs' changes on asylum support for children, bail consideration and the detention of pregnant women.

The bill will now return to the Commons for consideration of Lords amendments.

Third reading: Tuesday 12 April

Members of the Lords discussed amendments on court-granted bail, the definition of government departments in Northern Ireland and the detainment of pregnant women.

The bill will now be sent back to the Commons for consideration of Lords amendments.

Report stage day three: Monday 21 March

Members discussed proposed changes on a range of issues and there were four votes.

A proposed change, put forward by a member who came to the UK as a child refugee in the 1930s, requires the government to allow 3,000 child refugees from other European countries to be resettled in the UK. 306 voted in favour, 204 voted against, so the change was made.

The second vote, on a proposed change to grant asylum to people coming from areas where genocides are being perpetrated, was not passed (111 voted for and 148 against).

Members also voted on a proposed change to make translators who have worked for the government in Iraq and Afghanistan eligible for UK resettlement; 60 voted for and 136 against, so the change was not made.

The final vote was on the relocation of family members of people resident in the UK. 91 members voted for and 133 against, so the change was not made.

Third reading, a final chance to 'tidy up' the bill, is yet to be scheduled.

Report stage day two: Tuesday 15 March

Members of the Lords discussed proposed changes on a range of issues including support to migrants, passport information and unaccompanied refugee children. A change to the bill proposing that an immigrant may not be detained for more than 28 days went to a vote with 187 for and 170 against, so the change was made.

A third day of report stage is scheduled for 21 March

Report stage day one: Wednesday 9 March

Members of the Lords discussed amendments on a range of issues including the time taken for permission to be granted for asylum seekers to work, and rules around overseas domestic workers.

A second day of report stage is scheduled for 15 March.

Committee stage day five: Tuesday 9 February

Members of the Lords discussed amendments relating to marriage and civil partnership, access to higher education and a review of border security in the UK.

Report stage, further line by line examination of the bill, is yet to be scheduled.

Committee stage day four: Monday 3 February

Members of the Lords discussed human rights appeals, asylum support, and the rules around reunification of families.

The next day of committee stage is expected to take place on 9 February.

Committee stage day three: Monday 1 February

Members of the Lords discussed amendments relating to driving licences, bank accounts, deportation of immigrants, access to education and language requirements.

Committee stage concludes on 3 February when further amendments will be discussed.

Committee stage day two: Wednesday 20 January

Members of the Lords discussed amendments on subjects including illegal working and the detention of migrants.

Committee stage day one: Monday 18 January

Members of the Lords discussed amendments relating to the enforcement of labour market legislation, the protection of workers and access to health services.

Second reading: Tuesday 22 December

Members discussed the key points covered by the bill, including greater controls to combat illegal immigration and access to the UK, a requirement for all public sector workers in customer-facing roles to speak fluent English, and a charge for employers recruiting from outside the European Economic Area, with the money raised helping to train resident workers and fund apprenticeships in the UK.

Members raised a number of questions on issues including illegal working, support for asylum seekers, and if the bill should contain measures around reuniting families.

Immigration Bill summary

The bill will define laws around:

  • the law on immigration and asylum
  • access to services, facilities, licences and work by reference to immigration status
  • the Director of Labour Market Enforcement
  • language requirements for public sector workers
  • fees for passports and civil registration.

Further information

Image: iStockphoto

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