Modern Slavery Bill becomes law

26 March 2015

The Modern Slavery Bill became after after receiving royal assent in the Lords on Thursday 26 March.

Find out more about the bill's journey through the Lords. 

Modern Slavery Bill consideration of amendments: Wednesday 25 March

Peers discussed overseas domestic workers and how they can be protected from slavery. A proposed change to amend the restricted domestic worker visa went to a vote with 196 for and 285 against, so the change was not made.

Modern Slavery Bill third reading: Wednesday 4 March

Members of the Lords discussed details of the bill including regulations on identifying and supporting victims and the role of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority. Peers debated a proposed change that would allow for a website to be established for slavery reports, which went to a vote, with 205 for and 232 against, so the change was not made.

Modern Slavery Bill report stage day two: Wednesday 25 February

Members of the Lords discussed suggested changes to the bill covering the support and assistance provided for the physical, psychological and social recovery of victims of modern slavery.

An amendment to increase protection for overseas domestic workers was taken to a vote. Members voted 183 in favour and 176 against, so the change was made.

Modern Slavery Bill report stage day one: Monday 23 February

Members of the Lords discussed amendments on issues including child exploitation and civil remedies for modern slavery.

An amendment to include a statutory guarantee that the Independent Anti-Slave Commissioner can bring forward concerns directly to Parliament was taken to a vote. Members voted 154 in favour and 178 against, so the change was not made.

Modern Slavery Bill committee stage day four: Wednesday 10 December

Members of the Lords considered a proposal to establish an effective statutory National Referral Mechanism to identify trafficked, enslaved or exploited persons in the UK.

Peers also discussed slavery and human trafficking statements by large organisations, protection for overseas domestic workers, and the powers and duties of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority.

Modern Slavery Bill committee stage day three: Monday 8 December

Members of the Lords discussed the role and responsibilities of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner, including a proposal to broaden the remit of the post and its global dimension. Peers also considered further measures to increase protection for victims, such as the appointment of advocates for victims of child trafficking. 

Modern Slavery Bill committee stage day two: Wednesday 3 December

Members of the Lords discussed several suggested changes to the bill designed to help victims of trafficking and enslavement access justice - particularly in relation to civil actions. Peers also considered the introduction of slavery and trafficking prevention orders.

Modern Slavery Bill committee stage day one: Monday 1 December

Members of the Lords considered suggested changes relating to the offences of human trafficking and child exploitation. They also discussed a series of amendments covering the rights of victims of modern slavery, particularly concerning the duty of courts and public authorities.

Modern Slavery Bill second reading: Monday 17 November

Members of the Lords broadly welcomed the bill, but identified several areas for further consideration. These issues included:

  • the role and responsibilities of new advocates for victims of child trafficking
  • finding a balance between criminal justice and victim support
  • increasing the number of convictions
  • strengthening international efforts to tackle modern slavery. 

Further information

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