MPs debate lobbying, campaigning and trade union administration bill

03 September 2013

MPs debated the second reading of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill in the House of Commons on Tuesday 3 September 2013

The Leader of the House of Commons, Andrew Lansley, moved the motion for second reading. Shadow Leader of the House of Commons, Angela Eagle, moved a reasoned amendment on behalf of the Official Opposition.

The government motion was agreed on division (243 votes to 313 division 71). The Opposition amendment was negatived on division (309 votes to 247 division 72) 

Summary of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill

The Bill

  • introduces a statutory register of consultant lobbyists and establishes a Registrar to enforce the registration requirements
  • regulates more closely election campaign spending by those not standing for election or registered as political parties
  • strengthens the legal requirements placed on trade unions in relation to their obligation to keep their list of members up to date.

Progress of the Bill

The Bill was introduced into the House of Commons on 17 July 2013.

Keep up to date with all the proceedings and documentation, including amendment papers, on the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill and find out how a bill becomes an Act of Parliament.

What happens at second reading?

At second reading the House debates the whole principle of the bill. It usually takes place no sooner than two weekends after first reading.

The Member in charge or the Minister moves the motion 'that the bill be now read a second time'. MPs then debate the bill. MPs can also move a reasoned amendment to the bill at second reading.

At the end of the debate the Speaker determines whether there are any objections to the motion being debated and asks for the Ayes and Noes.

Members voice their opinion, and if no objections are made, the bill passes second reading without a vote. If the Speaker believes Members have voiced disagreement, a division is called and a vote taken.

What happens after second reading?

Following agreement of a programme motion the Bill will be considered by a Committee of the whole House.

This article was produced by the Commons Digital Outreach Team. Follow the @HouseofCommons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Image: Parliamentary Copyright

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