Committee stage: Lobbying, Campaigning and Trade Union Bill

11 September 2013

The House of Commons debated the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill in a Committee of the whole House over three days on Monday 9, Tuesday 10 and Wednesday 11 September 2013.

Committee stage: Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill, day three

The third day of debate on the Bill in a Committee of the whole House took place on Wednesday 11 September 2013.

Committee stage: Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill, day two

The second day of debate on the Bill in a Committee of the whole House took place on Tuesday 10 September 2013.

Committee stage: Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill, day one

The first day of debate on the Bill in a Committee of the whole House took place on Monday 9 September 2013.

Summary of the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill

The Bill

  • introduces a statutory register of consultant lobbyists and establishes a Registrar to enforce the registration requirements
  • regulates more closely election campaign spending by those not standing for election or registered as political parties
  • strengthens the legal requirements placed on trade unions in relation to their obligation to keep their list of members up to date.

Progress of the Bill

The Bill was introduced to the House of Commons on 17 July 2013 and had its second reading on 3 September 2013.

Keep up to date with all the proceedings and documentation, including amendment papers, on the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill and find out how a bill becomes an Act of Parliament.

What happens at a Committee of the whole House?

When a bill passes its second reading and is considered in detailed, this usually takes place in a Public Bill Committee held outside the Chamber and made up of between 16 and 20 MPs.

Occasionally a bill will be considered by a Committee of the whole House and this discussion tales place in the Chamber itself, where all MPs can take part.

Any bill can be referred to a Committee of the whole House, but the procedure is normally reserved for finance bills and other important or controversial legislation.

What happens next?

When the Bill has been considered by the Committee of the whole House other parts of the Bill will then be further considered by a Public Bill Committee.

Watching the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill from the public gallery

UK residents and overseas visitors can watch proceedings in the House of Commons by visiting the public gallery.

Image: Parliamentary Copyright

This article was produced by the Commons Digital Outreach Team. Follow the @HouseofCommons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber.

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