MPs debate cyber-bullying

MPs debate cyber-bullying
03 December 2013

MPs debated cyber-bullying on Tuesday 3 December 2013 in the House of Commons, in the first of two debates on subjects chosen by the Democratic Unionist Party. The second Opposition debate was on persecution of Christians in the 21st century

Debate: Cyber-bullying

MPs debated the motion:

"That this House recognises the serious problem of cyber-bullying and the appalling consequences for an increasing number of children and young people who are its victims; and calls on the Government to take action to help eradicate this form of intimidation and harassment, including the consideration of legislation to make cyber-bullying an offence."

The debate was moved by Shadow DUP Spokesperson for Communities and Local Government, David Simpson. The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Mr Edward Vaizey responded on behalf of the Government.

The motion was agreed to on question without a vote.

Debate: Persecution of Christians in the 21st Century

MPs debated the motion:

"That this House is concerned that the persecution of Christians is increasing in the 21st Century; notes that there are reports that one Christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith; further notes that Christianity is the most persecuted religion globally; bears in mind that the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion is a human right stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; and calls on the Government to do more both in its foreign policy and through its aid work to defend and support people of Christian faith."

The debate was moved by Shadow DUP Spokesperson for Human Rights, Jim Shannon. The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Mark Simmonds, responded on behalf of the Government.

The motion was agreed to on question without a vote.

Related information

About Opposition day debates

Opposition days are days allocated in the House of Commons in each session for the discussion of subjects chosen by the Opposition.

Seventeen days are at the disposal of the Leader of the Opposition, the leader of the largest opposition party, to decide which matters are debated. Three days are usually divided between the other opposition parties.

The Opposition generally use them to raise questions of policy and administration. Frequently, two separate subjects are debated on an opposition day.

Watching Opposition day debates from the public gallery

UK residents and overseas visitors can watch proceedings in the House of Commons by visiting the public gallery.

Image: iStock

This article was produced by the Commons Digital Outreach Team. Follow the @HouseofCommons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber.

More news on: Crime, civil law, justice and rights, Parliament, government and politics, Parliament, Crime, Equality, Religious discrimination, Internet and cybercrime, Commons news, Church and state

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