Third reading of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment) Bill

24 October 2011

Paul Beresford, Conservative MP for Mole Valley, introduced the third reading of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment) Bill in the House of Commons on Friday 21 October 2011.

Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment) Bill

The Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment) Bill is a Private Member's Bill which has been sponsored by Paul Beresford. The Bill had its second reading on 18 March 2011 and was considered by a Public Bill Committee.

The Bill was amended in Public Bill Committee, however no amendments were tabled for report stage and no report stage proceedings took place. The Bill was read a third time and passed and will now be sent to the House of Lords for consideration.

Summary of the Bill

Section 5 of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 created an offence of causing or allowing the death of a child or vulnerable adult. The Bill would amend Section 5 of the Act to widen its scope to include situations where children and vulnerable adults have been seriously harmed.

Private Members' Bills

Private Members' Bills are Public Bills introduced by MPs and Members of the Lords who aren't government ministers. As with other Public Bills their purpose is to change the law as it applies to the general population.

Third reading

Third reading is the final chance for the Commons to debate the contents of a Bill. It usually takes place immediately after report stage as the next item of business on the same day.

What happens at third reading?

Debate on the Bill is usually short, and limited to what is actually in the Bill, rather than, as at second reading, what might have been included.

Amendments (proposals for change) cannot be made to a Bill at third reading in the Commons. At the end of the debate, the House decides (votes on) whether to approve the third reading of the Bill.

What happens after third reading?

If the Bill started in the Commons it goes to the House of Lords for its first reading. If the Bill started in the Lords it returns to the House of Lords for consideration of any amendments the Commons has made.

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More news on: Parliament, government and politics, Crime, civil law, justice and rights, Crime, Parliament, Commons news, Bill news, Crimes of violence

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