Hansard (Official Report)

1628
The Commons makes its first recorded attempt to suppress reports of parliamentary debates.

1680
The Commons decides to print 'Votes and Proceedings' of the House, which include texts of Royal Speeches, Addresses to the Sovereign and Answers, the Orders and Resolutions of the House, and brief entries of Petitions and Papers presented to it.

1711
Abel Boyer begins publishing the Political State of Britain, which includes parliamentary debates.

1738
MPs declare that it is a "high indignity and a notorious breach of privilege" to report what is said in the Chamber.

1771
Suppression of parliamentary reports finally ends following a legal battle by the radical MP and journalist John Wilkes.

1800
William Cobbett starts publishing Cobbett's Weekly Political Register, later Cobbett's Parliamentary Debates.

1812
Cobbett sells the contract for debates to Thomas Curson Hansard due to insolvency.

1877
The Chancellor pays Hansard a grant in order to cover more parliamentary activity.

1909
Parliament recruits 11 shorthand writers as it takes control of producing Hansard - which was then named the Official Report.

1943
The name "Hansard" returns to the front page of the Official Report.

1997
Hansard goes online at the Parliament website.

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